If you asked my opinion a year ago what is easier in a troubled economy, managing an agency or corporate PR team or selling a house, I almost would have laughed…well of course, selling a house is easier. Everyone knows that.

Right? Ah, wrong.

Working with at times irksome and annoying external or internal clients/stakeholders of varying degrees of talent and temperament demands tremendous amounts of patience and perseverance. There is simply no argument. In addition, a skilled PR practitioner must coordinate the development of the message, prepare the messengers, set the timing and target the recipients, what could easily be labeled as “communications choreography.”

That means that everyone is on the same page and singing out of the same hymnal (pardon the awful clichés). Is this process very similar to…staging a house for a sale? Let’s delve a little deeper into this comparison.

Working for an international public relations agency, you are aligned with a series of people with various tasks and hopefully the majority with the same agenda. There are the members of your own team, your agency bosses, your clients, their executives, their partners, their suppliers, the legion of analysts, editors, reporters, bloggers…Negotiating through this litany of humanity to achieve a desired branding or marketing result in a tough economy requires an incredible amount of resolve and fortitude.

And in the case of a publicly traded company, financial results must be reported four times a year, an annual meeting for shareholders must be conducted and the annual report (the 10K) must be issued each spring regardless of exogenous events. These could include: pre-announcements, mergers and acquisitions, IPOs, restructurings, mandated restatements or any other “material” event that requires immediate disclosure under SEC rules. That means that a company must not only employ PR people trained in telling the story, but also a legion of attorneys, accountants, controllers, IR pros and corporate development types to go along with the CEO, CFO etc…the folks that make up the team.

So does this same team building exercise and plan execution also apply to selling a house? Based upon my recent experience, I can safely reply in the affirmative.

A seller must interact with an assorted collection of contractors, pool remodelers, granite counter-top builders, “equity beige” rug installers, nosy neighbors, pest inspectors, house cleaners and pesky Realtors. If you think Mussolini had trouble keeping the Italian trains on time, try coordinating/choreographing this motley crew and keeping them to a schedule. There is no place in your schedule for the “manana” syndrome, but you will be asked repeatedly if this task or that task can be put off to another day. You have to resist the temptation of being too nice, while maintaining your professionalism.

In the corporate world, the SEC requires quarterly financial result reports, the 10K, annual meeting, and any “material” disclosures on the corporate side. Who serves as the SEC when it comes to a home sale? I guess that would be the seller…in this case, little Ole me.

Starting tomorrow, my house will go on the market first with the Realtor tour and then with open houses this weekend. My purpose in bringing up this point is to not market my house via my blog. I am helping my Realtor with the marketing and she is the one that will carry that burden.

My point is that I am sitting at the vortex of a $749,000 business…yes; selling your house is a business. A house sale has its own particular P&L statement: the costs associated with staging the house, the obligatory Realtor fee, paying off of the first and second mortgages and after all of that…hopefully something for me (e.g. the profit). I never thought that selling a house would be akin to managing agency PR or corporate PR teams and all of the associated players that are a necessary evil and require the same degree of people skills.

Guess this experience is yet another one of life’s lessons learned.

Advertisements