Considering the worldwide infatuation of PR-Marketing types with 24/7/365 digital publishing, a simple reflection-prompting question needs to be posed:

Where does social media fit within the mantra: Message-Candidate-Campaign?

The development of the message? Nope.

The selection of a candidate(s) to deliver the campaign? Nein.

How about as part of the campaign for the candidate to deliver the message? Yep.

Or…?

… As an increasingly effective weapon in the arsenal of a proven communications choreographer.

So maybe the mantra should be amended to read: Message-Candidate-Choreography-Campaign? Hmmm…

My point in raising these questions is to not to rain on the publicity industry’s euphoria about Web 2.0 (e.g. blogging, podcasting, webcasting, micro-social media sites) because I would like to think of myself as an evangelist as well when it comes to digital publishing. Social media is an increasingly vital component of the campaign, but message, candidate and choreography have to come first.

This makes perfect sense because without a message, without a candidate, and without the completion of communications choreography, the waging of a public relations/marketing/branding campaign is impossible.

leeatwater

I first heard “Message-Candidate-Campaign” in that particular order from a presidential campaign address by the late Lee Atwater, running then-Vice President George H.W. Bush’s successful campaign for president in 1988.

Campaign consultants are not warm-and-fuzzy people and certainly Atwater was no exception. He was wickedly smart and two decades later I can’t argue with Message-Candidate-Campaign manifesto, but obviously I have been tempted to amend it.

We can also take the global embrace of social media and put it in the proper context.

The catalyst for any PR offensive is the message. What are the attributes of the product that a company wants to sell? What are the intended societal benefits behind the public service announcement? What are the promises that are being made by the candidate for office?

The answers to these questions and many more are what constitute strategy. Essentially what can the company, product, non-profit, governmental agency and candidate do and what are the selling points? The strategy also includes what is not being said and not being offered because there are always resource limitations.

Now, who is the candidate? Who is the messenger? What is the brand? Essentially who or what is delivering the message?

Next up is the choreography or in this case, communications choreography. Just like someone mapping the movements of dancers or actors on a stage and synchronizing them to a script and/or music, a communications choreographer must ensure that everyone is on the same page. What is the message? Who is the candidate? Who is/are the end audience(s)? What media will be used (conventional? social? Both?). What are the deliverables? What is the timetable? How is success measured?

And now it is time to consider the execution of the campaign, the actual delivery of the message by the candidate following the guidance provided and employing conventional and/or social media to enhance reputation, build brand, advance thought leadership and ultimately win the day.

Every few years, and the pace is rapidly accelerating, there is a new landmark medium of communication (e.g. fax machines, cell phones, PCs, Internet routers/switches, social media, tablets…) and each one indeed changed or is changing the ways that we do business. These innovations have globalized, accelerated and reduced news cycles to about four hours. Social media is now a permanent fixture of the communications landscape.

Having acknowledged this undeniable fact, the message is still paramount…and then comes the candidate, followed by choreography that must require social media and finally, the execution of the campaign.

Message-Candidate-Choreography-Campaign. That’s the new mantra.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Atwater

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choreography

Advertisements