“Everybody I know seems to know me well, but they’re never gonna know that I move like hell.” – Led Zeppelin’s What Is and What Should Never Be

Second cut, first side, Led Zeppelin II, 1969.

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The fact that this song is still one of my favorites is irrelevant to everyone, but me.

The fact that I can remember this song and the entire Led Zeppelin catalogue is troublesome.

Everyone who comes into visual contact with me may instantly conclude that I am a follicly challenged, mature, white, male of the species, and some may be inclined to add the charming adjective, “privileged.”

Was I and many others that fit the perception privileged to have the resources way back then to purchase Led Zeppelin II in vinyl?

More to the point: What am I and presumably others in the same aging, white, male boat going to do about our present state of affairs? What can we do to prevent society from putting us out to pasture?

How about: Move like hell?

“I am sure there are at least 1 million white males, qualified and overqualified, in a similar frustrating situation.” – Unemployed Baby Boomer public relations pro

He forgot the word, “privileged.” My daughter, my very own flesh and blood, under the gravitational pull of San Francisco/Berkeley, repeatedly employs this moniker.

She even mentioned the dreaded “Military-Industrial Complex.” Did she realize she was quoting a Republican, Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1961 farewell address as our 34th president? Before you ask, I do not remember Eisenhower even though I was born during Ike’s first term.

And there are many more who were born during Eisenhower’s two terms (or earlier). Is it time for society to involuntarily retire these people, redefining (and respelling) the term pasture-ization?

Or can they overcome the odds and contribute to society, become engaged and give back to the world? I know where I come down on these questions.

“I lost my job on Wall Street and now it’s over.’ Give me a break. You’re not in Somalia, right? You haven’t lost your abilities. You can find a way to retool.” – Life Coach Tony Robbins

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There are literally millions of Baby Boomer pale males…and most likely Baby Boomer females too… who believe that society has passed them over. This is the time for a cup half-full. Robbins is right. You can do it, and you are not an old dog that can’t learn new tricks.

So what can these mature knuckle-draggers do to reclaim their Mojo? How about: Move like hell? Here are some thoughts, not in any particular order but they work well cumulatively.

Cross Training. Yes, the combination of serious aerobics and resistance training in every other day intervals for each. Prove Isaac Newton’s First Law of Physics to be correct about a body in motion, staying in motion. You are not only doing yourself a big favor in terms of your health, you are going feel better about yourself and project confidence.

Be Enthusiastic about everything you do. Celebrate every victory, even the small ones. Nobody wants to hire Gloomy Gus or Negative Nancy. It is easier to be negative than positive. Be realistic, but not a Pollyanna. Having said that, always ask yourself how you can rather than how you can’t.

Get Smart. Be Smart. Is it time to go back to school? Yep those places with text books, online readings, exams, papers etc. There are ever more jobs that require master’s degrees, let alone bachelor’s degrees. Are you prepared as you need to be?

Find love. In my sixth decade on this planet, I found love again and married my second wife, Jeanne. Married people are happier. Finding a good job in this economy is tough. Marrying a wonderful spouse is even more difficult. And if you do, make sure that decision makers know all about it.

Stay current. So many give up on politics, government and business. As Charles Krauthammer, who overcame being paralyzed in a college swimming pool accident to win the Pulitzer Prize, wrote in Things That Matter, politics is an essential human discipline. Get it wrong and you can end up with Germany circa 1933. Understanding the world is pivotal to realizing your personal potential.

Keep on Working. Brandon Stanton, the 29-year old best-selling author/photographer of The Humans of New York was asked about the secret of his stunning and unexpected success. His answer was simple: “Keep on working.” His admonition reminds me of the late Jim Valvano, “Don’t give up. Don’t ever give up.” Giving up is a self-fulfilling prophecy.

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Write 15 minutes or more every day. Keep your brain engaged. Everyone is a Thought Leader. Everyone has an expertise. Whether it is conventionally or digitally, transmitting your thoughts into written expression builds confidence in your communication skills and likewise about your overall talents.

Think Digital, Be Digital. The Baby Boomer generation is the last to not be digital natives. So how does that impact the price of tea in China? It doesn’t. Even though Samsung’s ads make fun about adults and technology, suggesting that kids run circles around us, the reality can be way different. Walking in to present a seminar on social media last year, some were wondering why I didn’t have a skateboard. The answer is that I know WordPress, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, SlideShare and others. The same should be true for you.

Fight Back. Every day is a personal improvement day. No one decides that your career is over, except you. If we fail here or there, the game is not over. How can each of us get better? How can we be more competitive? What skill sets can each of us gain? Can we learn from others? Can others learn from each of us?

Society as a whole may not know it, but I move like hell…and so can you.

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/ledzeppelin/whatisandwhatshouldneverbe.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military%E2%80%93industrial_complex

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/jim_valvano.html

http://www.humansofnewyork.com/photographer

http://ideas.time.com/2013/12/16/30-under-30-meet-brandon-stanton-the-photographer-behind-humans-of-new-york/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Krauthammer

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