“The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.” — Attributed or misattributed to genius Albert Einstein

Is Seattle dying?

Can we also contend that Portland is on life support?

We know that is the case with San Francisco. And let’s not forget LA.

Almost DailyBrett was watching Seattle’s KOMO News ABC News affiliate’s documentary about the Emerald City’s homeless epidemic and realized it was produced two-years ago. Nothing has changed, other than the acute problem has become even worse.

Some may dismiss the documentary simply because the conservative Sinclair Broadcast Group manages KOMO Channel 7. If they do, are they shooting the messenger and ignoring the vile reality?

The homeless are on the street, the needles are piling up, the garbage is still there and the crime rate is rising. Sounds like The Third World, but instead Seattle is America’s second-place Silicon Valley.

Seattle government types tell angry people to simply call 9-1-1. The police come. The same homeless are arrested. Within 24 hours they are back on the street, waiting to repeat the endless cycle.

What’s the answer?

California Governor Gavin Newsom is advocating releasing 76,000 violent criminals onto similar homeless streets, while way too many of their local governments are proposing to defund the police. Does this proposition sound like the answer to rising homelessness, drugs, filth and crime?

The KOMO documentary pointed out that Seattle from all sources is pouring more than $1 billion annually into fixing the homeless problem, and yet nothing happens.

Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles are all doing the same thing, rationalizing homelessness, drug addiction, trash, feces and crime and when all else fails — throwing even more money at the problem. Wash and repeat.

Civic leaders in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles and the governors of these respective states of California, Oregon and Washington (i.e., Newsom, Kate Brown, Jay Inslee) always have ready sanctimonious answers, but none of them has a solution.

And the band plays on.

Demonstrate Courageous Leadership, Enforce The Law

Many complain about the monopoly power of entrepreneurs who developed the best search engine, the preeminent digital retail site, the No. 1 social media platform, but what about affording the same hegemony to law enforcement?

In the wake of the George Floyd murder, it’s increasingly tough to make this argument right now. How else are the streets of Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles going to be reclaimed?

California needs to apologize for getting it wrong in the mid-1960s. The state Legislature passed The Lanterman-Petris-Short Act, which opened up the state’s mental institutions — ending warehousing — sending literally thousands who had zero chance of taking care of themselves onto the streets.

Some went to community care. Some took their pills. Others were left on the streets. They did not take their pills. The homeless problem immediately mushroomed and spread from sea-to-shining-sea, particularly in permissive venues.

Almost DailyBrett believes these people need to be “warehoused” again. They are safer under state mental health care. Communities are restored. The streets are cleaned. A major source of crime is alleviated. Cities are safer.

Homeless advocates will go bat-excrement. They need to be told to pound sand. We need new sheriffs in towns up-and-down the Left Coast.

Crowd seen during a town hall meeting with Seattle City Council at Trinity United Methodist church in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood, May 2, 2018.

Blaming conservative media, pointing to rising housing prices, paying homage to homeless special interests, and most of all throwing money at the problem have all not worked. It’s obvious for anyone to see.

We need those who have the courage to become unpopular and yet solve the problem, not those who want to win a Nobel Prize for just being nice.

https://www.newsweek.com/california-homeless-camp-trash-needles-821274

https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2021-05-01/76-000-california-inmates-now-eligible-for-earlier-releases