Tag Archive: Autzen Stadium


Oregon has not fired a head football coach since 1976.

That streak will come to a close with the termination of Mark Helfrich.

Why? He presided over the end of the Golden Era of Oregon Football.helfrichbeard

Some will contend the musings of Almost DailyBrett and a growing chorus of Duck commentators are a reflection of Oregon fans being spoiled. Joey Harrington is the high-priest of this particular gospel.

You were a great quarterback for Oregon, Joey, but it’s time for you and other apologists to smell the coffee. Oregon’s demise is real and sustaining, and no amount of Uncle Phil money is going to change it.

Unless the present course is dramatically changed, Coach Helfrich and the majority of his staff need to be shown the door.

Consider yesterday’s very winnable game against Nebraska on the road.

The first two-point conversion attempt was successful. Great. Now let’s kick extra points. What? Helfrich kept going for two-point conversions and the team failed four consecutive times … and the Ducks lost by three? What did Einstein reportedly say about trying the same thing over-and-over again and getting the same result? The definition of insanity.

How many penalties did the Ducks incur? Five? 10? How about 13 for 126 yards? This sad result comes down to one conclusion: Coaching.helfrichriley

Now before you state that one-game does not constitute a trend, let’s examine the unmistakable trend. In Wall Street terms it is downward and to the right, time to sell the stock.

During Chip Kelly’s four years as head coach, the Ducks were 46-7, including a dominating 33-3 in the Pac-12 conference. Oregon went on to the Rose Bowl twice, winning one; won the Fiesta Bowl and came within a field goal of taking the “Natty.”

Now in his fourth year as head coach (the first one, trying to grow a beard), Helfrich is 35-9, including 22-5 in conference. Inheriting Chip’s recruits, including 2014 Heisman Trophy winner Marcus Mariota, the Ducks were 24-4 overall, 15-3 in conference in Helfrich’s first two years, winning another Rose Bowl and an Alamo Bowl.

Since losing the 2015 Natty to Ohio State in a blow out, the Ducks are 11-7. Last year’s defense gave up a school record 37.5 points per game, and this year’s “D” is no better. How can we forget that Oregon lost to Utah by six touchdowns at Autzen, and blew a 31-point halftime lead at the Alamo Bowl?oregontcu1

For the second time in two seasons, a one-and-done “grad” student is playing quarterback. Vernon Adams and Dakota Prukop are more than capable, but what happens to Oregon when the one-and-done sustains an injury (e.g., Adams)?

Ready to take on Washington, USC and Stanford, true freshman Justin Herbert?

Oregon is the storied program that has developed fabulous quarterbacks who played two, three or four years (i.e.., Dan Fouts, Chris Miller, Bill Musgrave, Joey Harrington, Kellen Clemens, Dennis Dixon, Darron Thomas and of course, Marcus “Heisman” Mariota).

How about recruiting a stud high school quarterback or two and letting one of them win the job? Travis Jonson from Servite was supposed to be the “guy.” He is running fourth string. Five-star defensive lineman Canton Kaumatule was supposed to make us forget Haloti Ngata. Instead, we are fondly remembering DeForest Buckner and deep-sixing any thoughts of Kaumatule in Canton.

Oregon arguably has the best facilities in the nation for football, a good reason why the team stays in the discussion despite being marooned in America’s geographic cul-de-sac, the Pacific Northwest. And yet, the program’s recruiting classes are dropping off under Helfrich and his staff, presently running #38 nationally and number five in the Pac-12 behind Arizona and Colorado.

Nebraska celebrated an NCAA record 350 consecutive sellouts in its 90,000-seat stadium this past weekend. Oregon is now working on a two-game streak of non-sellouts at 54,000-seat Autzen Stadium.

How many losses will the Ducks endure this season? The two gimmies, which were not as easy as they seemed on paper (i.e., the dreaded UC Davis Aggies and the vaunted Virginia Cavaliers) are in the books. The Pac-12 conference with its great offenses lies before Oregon. And how does Oregon with one of the worst defenses in the nation even get to the Las Vegas Bowl, let alone the Fiesta or Rose?

Better get out your green-and-yellow rosary beads, D-coordinator Brady Hoke.

Almost DailyBrett was rooting for Oregon before it was cool. This is your author’s 27th year as a season ticket holder and a Duck Athletic Fund member. No one can accuse this blog of representing only a fair-weather fan.

Having said that, the undeniable truth must be told. The Ducks are looking at three more losses and possibly five or more. A post-season — any bowl — is not assured. Want to take the “under”?

Oregon cannot sustain its success on Uncle Phil’s money alone. Coaching matters. Coach Helfrich and his staff are on the hot seat.

Wonder if UO Athletic Director Rob Mullens already has some names in mind when the inevitable change becomes … inevitable?

http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/sports/blogs/martini/2016/09/17/oregon-ducks-loss-nebraska-100-percent-mark-helfrich/90601784/

http://www.oregonlive.com/sports/oregonian/john_canzano/index.ssf/2016/09/canzano_identity_crisis_at_ore.html#incart_river_home_pop

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Oregon_Ducks_football_seasons

http://www.goducks.com/roster.aspx?path=football

http://www.oregonlive.com/ducks/index.ssf/2016/09/penalties_continue_to_add_up_f.html

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2012/08/16/rooting-for-oregon-before-it-was-cool/

 

 

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The equivalent of one Big House filled with fans has clicked on Almost DailyBrett.bighouse

Well close enough. Michigan’s “Big House” officially holds 109,901. This blog passed the 100K page views mark Wednesday. Okay maybe not exactly as much as one Big House, but it’s good enough for government work.

Just as important, if not even more so, Almost DailyBrett has drawn more than 62,000 unique visitors, easily exceeding the 54,000 stated capacity of Autzen Stadium in Eugene. Fortunately, this blog is not as noisy as Oregon’s friendly confines.Autzenatnight

Certainly a lot of water has flowed up the Willamette since Almost DailyBrett debuted in July 2009. During that entire summer month, there were a grand total of … seven page views. Yep, there were only seven pairs of eyes that clicked on this blog. One would be tempted to ask: If Almost DailyBrett was posted in a forest and there wasn’t anyone to click on it, did it make any sound?

So what are my sentiments about having a blog, which has reached and exceeded the 100,000 page-view after 378 posts during the course of past 79 months?

Humbling, in a word.

It’s also awesome when one contemplates that Moore’s Law (number of transistors on a piece of silicon real estate doubles every 18-24 months) and resultant Web 2.0, makes online publishing possible. Are we starting to take web publishing for granted?

Image converted using ifftoany

Image converted using ifftoany

What really blows the mind of the author of Almost DailyBrett is this blog has been read in 144 or more countries around the world. There are more than a few days when every continent on the planet is represented. Try doing that in the age of newspapers. Imposible.

Some believe that blogging is dead. These poor souls are just wrong.

The largest blogging site, WordPress, hosts 74.6 million blogs, drawing 409 million readers to 16.3 billion pages. Every day WordPress features 618 million new posts, attracting 55 million daily comments. Seventy-one percent of WordPress blogs are posted in English; 5 percent in Spanish.

Any best of all: No Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) is necessary.

And yet there are literally millions of dead blogs, oodles of morbid blogs. Almost DailyBrett could have been a deceased blog, but it similar to so many others, survived and persevered.

Seven Strategies for Blogging Glory

  1. There should be joy in your blogging. This is a tremendous opportunity to share your opinions, to demonstrate thought leadership and build your own brand. Keep in mind that digital is eternal. Follow the rule that if you are upset and despondent to stay away from the keyboard. Wait until you are in a proper frame of mood. Pathos is a key component of blogging, being out-of-control is fraught with peril._MG_1292 (3)
  2. Take Care with Your Blog Name. Your blog should afford you the opportunity literally way in on any issue. You should not paint yourself with a title that is restrictive (e.g., “At the Movies”) unless you want to be a one-trick blogging pony. Yours truly went to parochial school for 12-long years. Contemplated Give Us Our Daily Bread … Give Us our Daily Brett. Eventually the name matriculated to Almost DailyBrett, flexibility and branding at the same time.
  3. Pull > Push. Every successful blog employs “push” techniques such as headlines, blurbs, URLs and JPEGs on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter etc. (the latter imposes the Draconian 140-character rule). More importantly are “pull” strategies to attract the search engines including categories and tags. Almost DailyBrett guesstimates that for every one page view that comes from pushing out the blog to social media another eight page views comes from search engine marketing or SEM.
  4. Digital Rules; Analog Matters. There is zero doubt that attracting the digital search engines is the predominate method to attract search engines, which translates into page views and visitors, keep in mind that old-fashioned Journalism still matters. Write compelling headlines. Think What, When, Where, Who, Why, How and Who Cares in the first two of three paragraphs of your blog. We live in a 140-character Twitter and texting world … get to the point.
  5. Provocative, Not Notorious. Every one of your readers is precious. They are on this planet for only so long. Don’t be afraid of being provocative. Take a stand and defend it. Respect the opinions of others. Don’t live in a filter bubble. Engage in a conversation … but remember: Be offensive without being offensive.
  6. Think Skin … To A Point. Criticism and sassy/snarky responses are part of blogging. If you are NOT receiving digging responses from time-to-time, there is something wrong with your blog. Keep in mind there are boundaries. Just as you should never use outright profanities, name calling and slurs, you should not tolerate them either.
  7. Don’t Agonize. This point is the reciprocal of having joy in your blogging. If the topic for your next blog post is not coming immediately to mind, don’t panic. As former Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart famously said about pornography, “I know it, when I see it.” Trust me, your subject will come to you sooner or later.blog

Almost DailyBrett today sets out on the trail of another 100,000 page views, and more importantly 100,000 total visitors from around the world. Your author is proud to say that 20+ years after the onset of Web 2.0 that blogging thrives.

Demonstrate thought leadership.

Lead the conversation.

Make the world a better place.

Blog baby, blog!

 

Almost DailyBrett

Lost my Apple 5s smart phone on Lufthansa flight #491 from Seattle to Frankfurt.

Besides being a $599 mistake, yours truly had no cell phone for the entire course of our 17-day honeymoon to Bavaria (e.g., Gemütlichkeit) and to Tuscany (e.g., Le Dolce Vita).

To more than a few the loss of a cell phone for almost three weeks would be the near equivalent of being sentenced to three years of solitary confinement or even worse, suicide. How can life possibly go on? How can my online disciples know exactly what I am doing at exactly this very point in time? Shudder: No smart phone means a world without Facebook “likes” and immediate gratification.

Tourists use a selfie stick on the Trocadero Square, with the Eiffel Tower in background, in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. Selfie sticks have become enormously popular among tourists because you don’t have to ask strangers to take your picture, and unlike hand-held selfies, you can capture a wider view without showing your arm. But some people find selfie sticks obnoxious, arguing that they detract from the travel experience. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

Tourists use a selfie stick on the Trocadero Square, with the Eiffel Tower in background, in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. Selfie sticks have become enormously popular among tourists because you don’t have to ask strangers to take your picture, and unlike hand-held selfies, you can capture a wider view without showing your arm. But some people find selfie sticks obnoxious, arguing that they detract from the travel experience. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

Even for Pollyannaish me, I immediately realized that Lufthansa was not going to find my cell phone in the messy cabin of a Boeing 747. Maybe it ended up in some flea market along the banks of the Main River.

Hopefully, I still had an upgrade at Verizon Wireless (alas that was not the case). Quickly coming to full acceptance mode, I rationalized there were at least 1,000 worse things that can happen to anyone than just misplacing an uninsured cell phone.

Besides Jeanne and I were on our belated honeymoon. Beer was on the tables in fun München and soon Sangiovese would be served al fresco in romantic Firenze. There were art museums to check out, castles to explore, and little Alpine towns that beckoned us. The cell phone replacement could just wait for our return to bucolic Ellensburg, Washington

Mobile Technology Liberation

What became immediately apparent in my first moments of Apple OS cold turkey was watching the teeming hordes on München’s famed Marienplatz, and coming to the realization about literally how many people were paying more attention to their mobile devices than the centuries worth of history all around them.

What would Mad King Ludwig think? Would smart phone narcissism drive him crazy?

And then I saw them: The narcisticks. Yes, the selfie-sticks. The same selfie-sticks that would be hocked by the bushel on the Ponte Vecchio the following week in Firenze. München’s 11 a.m. Glockenspiel play may be in full motion in the background, but the selfie-stick crowd was more interested in the folks in the foreground – the very same people they saw in the mirror earlier that very same morning.selfiestickobama

Smart phones have become indispensable, but at the same time they are addicting. This point is not novel, but to see it played out throughout Europe at the height of the summer tourist season was nonetheless stunning, revealing and disconcerting.

One week later, we were the first through the doors of the Galleria dell’ Accademia in Florence. We immediately headed for Michelangelo’s 17-foot masterpiece sculpture of David. Being among the first, we took digital photos of the statue and ourselves in front of David. We concentrated and admired arguably the greatest sculpture on the planet, dating back to 1504.

Coming back later, the crowds predictably had descended on David, including literally hundreds with their mobile phones and selfie sticks (don’t inadvertently scratch the statue!). What would King David think, if he was still around? ‘I fought off Goliath, and I have held this pose for more than 500 years, just to have you take a selfie in front of me?’

Early the next day was the Uffizi Gallery and Botticcelli’s The Birth of Venus and Primavera. Once again, the early birds caught the worm and we were virtually alone with these 15th Century masterpieces for a few precious minutes. Our relative solitude would soon change as the selfie-stick brigade came charging down the second floor hallway of the Uffizi. Yes, Venus standing on her sea-shell would serve as the mere background for the narcissists in the foreground.

Be sure to smile. Maybe Venus can even be in focus?

Behind the Iron Curtain

A little more than three decades ago, yours truly made his first trip overseas to Leonid Brezhnev’s Russia. PCs were just being mainstreamed by IBM in 1981. There were really no cell phones, let alone selfie sticks. We went into and out of the Soviet Union with no ways to communicate, other than postcards back home or an ultra-expensive KGB monitored phone call from the Intourist hotel.

During the course of this venture and subsequent pleasure and business trips to Europe and Asia, I always tried to concentrate on the dramatic change of scenery, the splendors of the Old World and the different cultures. It was about Russia, England, Germany, Netherlands, Italy, Japan etc., and not about me … and I was fine with that.

The libertarian in me usually gravitates in the direction of personal freedom. At the same time, there is a global movement toward the banning of narcisticks including Disney parks, the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel, Mecca, Lake Tahoe and wisely … The Running of the Bulls at Pamplona (great selfie shot before being gored by angry Torro).selfiestickpamplona

Autzen Stadium in Eugene (e.g., “It never rains at Autzen Stadium”) has banned umbrellas. Why? They are potentially dangerous and they block views of Oregon touchdowns. As a 25-year season ticket holder, this ban makes sense. Besides it rarely rains that hard in Oregon.

Prohibiting selfie sticks in the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles works for little ole me. According to Travel Advisor Tips, there are “17 grand arched windows facing Palace of Versailles gardens [which] are reflected in the 17 arches inlaid with 357 pieces of mirrors creating the effect of mesmerizing beauty.”

Three-hundred fifty-seven mirrors? Isn’t that enough for even the most dedicated narcissist?

Guess not. How would the narcissist’s friends “like” these pleasing reflections, if they cannot see them online? That simply will not do.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selfie_stick

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/sunday-review/what-selfie-sticks-really-tell-us-about-ourselves.html?_r=0

http://www.cntraveler.com/galleries/2014-11-04/no-selfies-social-media-bans-at-landmarks

http://artdaily.com/news/76962/More-bad-news-for-selfie-stick-lovers–Paris-museums-move-towards-ban-on-sticks#.VdzA3I2FNCo

http://www.traveladvisortips.com/palace-of-versailles-hall-of-mirrors-facts/

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/more-people-killed-selfies-shark-075732332.html#Gh74G2a

 

 

 

 

Reportedly, a 36-year-old Rich Brooks was told there was no way he could win at Oregon, when he accepted a $32,000 per year, four-year contract to become head coach in 1977.richbrooks

There were no natural advantages at the counterculture oriented, liberal arts university located in a college town tucked away in a sparsely populated, rainy slice of America’s cul-de-sac, the Pacific Northwest. Brooks predecessor was 9-24 in three years.

The negative recruiters, who were steering studs to USC, UCLA and Washington, said that star high school recruits could not work on their game year around in Eugene; they would never win a championship; never play in a bowl game; never be seen on television; never play in a game that mattered …

And for the most part they were correct. Ground zero was the absolutely awful 0-0 “Toilet Bowl” tie against Oregon State in 1983. Thankfully, the game will go down in NCAA history as the last scoreless tie ever played.

Hmmm…the Ducks played in the last scoreless game and the first college football playoff game, dominating Florida State 59-20 and winning the Rose Bowl as well. What a difference three decades can make?

And according to USA Today, ESECPN and others, all the credit goes to Nike founder/super $19.9 billion alumnus Phil Knight.

unclephil

As we celebrate the legendary contributions of Phil and Penny Knight in terms of Oregon’s brand and facilities, let’s not forget the achievements of an Oregon State grad, Rich Brooks.

No Swooshes on the Uniforms

There is a reason the turf at Autzen Stadium is called, “Rich Brooks Field.”

During the course of his 18-year stint as Oregon’s head coach, the Ducks went 91-109-4 … not a record that would prompt anyone to write home to mumsy. Many alums were calling for Brooks scalp, when one year of mediocrity followed another in the early 1990s.

Oregon played in a relatively small (41,000 capacity at the time) noisy stadium, Spartan facilities, rarely on television, and had trouble competing against the USCs, UCLAs and most of all, the Washingtons of the conference.

And yet Rich Brooks hired the core group of coaches that started the Golden Era of Oregon football: Mike Bellotti, offensive coordinator; Nick Aliotti, defensive coordinator; Don Pellum, linebackers: Gary Campbell, running backs; Steve Greatwood, offensive line; and Jim Radcliffe, strength and conditioning.

In turn, they found gems in the rough … Danny O’Neil, Ricky Whittle, Cristin McLemore, Jeremy Asher, Rich Ruhl … and a redshirt freshman defensive back by the name of Kenny Wheaton as in, “Kenny Wheaton is going to score. Kenny Wheaton is going to score” that propelled the Oregon Ducks to their first Rose Bowl in 37 years in 1994.

A

The Oregon Ducks with traditional uniforms that mimicked the look of the Green Bay Packers with no swooshes to be found gave #No. 2 Penn State holly heck that day before falling 38-20. Even in defeat, it finally become cool to root for Oregon.

Goodbye Rich; Enter Phil

After winning national coach of the year awards, Rich Brooks was a hot commodity. He was hired by the St. Louis Rams for a contract far in excess of his $32,000 starting salary at Oregon.

What followed was the heralded conversation between “Uncle Phil” and Brooks’ successor, Mike Bellotti. What did Oregon need to compete? An indoor practice facility. The rest is history. Knight wrote the $10 million check that allows Oregon athletes to work on their game year round.

Since that time, Knight invested more than $300 million to the Oregon Athletic Department including $70 million for the football performance center, $60 million for the renovation and expansion of Autzen Stadium; $60 million for an academic center and $100 million for the basketball arena (e.g., the Matthew Knight Arena).

The Ducks in turn have revolutionized football, particularly under Chip Kelly and Mark Helfrich as head coaches, and Scott Frost as offensive coordinator. Wearing the cool Nike uniform du jour, the Ducks run their spread offense at a warp-speed tempo and put up ridiculous amounts of points.

They still don’t out-recruit USC or UCLA, but they find their “guys” to fit into the system, and Almost DailyBrett knows the coolness factor helps attract the attention of studs that would never have considered the little school from the little state in the Pacific Northwest.

The bricks of the Berlin Wall of negative recruiting … lousy weather, subpar facilities, no bowls, no championships, no Heismans, no television … have all fallen by the wayside.

rich-brooks1

To be fair, we need to reflect on the guy that got it started, Rich Brooks. He will never be accused of being warm and fuzzy, and maybe that contributed to those who called for his firing in 1993-1994. He turned the Ducks around. It took a patient 18 years, but his perseverance was rewarded. He ushered in the Golden Era of Oregon Football.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rich_Brooks

http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/ncaaf/pac12/2014/12/29/oregon-nike-phil-knight-college-football-playoff/21013009/

http://www.forbes.com/profile/phil-knight/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2012/08/16/rooting-for-oregon-before-it-was-cool/

 

 

Ducks to Represent Huskies in Pac-12

Seattle, WA, April 1, 2013/PR Newswire/The University of Washington and the University of Oregon have completed a preliminary memorandum of understanding (MOU) agreement calling for the University of Washington to outsource its Athletic Department teams to the University of Oregon.

Under the terms of the agreement, which takes effect immediately, all overlapping University of Washington sports, including football and men’s basketball, will be transferred to the administration and coaching provided by the University of Oregon. The exceptions are men’s and women’s crew and women’s gymnastics teams, which will still compete under the banner of the University of Washington in the Pac-12 Conference.

husky

The Athletic MOU follows on the heels of a similar academic pact between the two Northwest universities in which the University of Washington outsourced the teaching and research of business administration, architecture and allied arts, law, and journalism and communication to the respective professional programs offered by the University of Oregon.

Speaking at a joint news conference today at the University of Washington campus, Washington Athletic Director Scott Woodward saluted the University of Oregon for its protracted dominance in athletics, particularly the Ducks nine-game winning streak over Washington in football and its three-game sweeps in both men’s basketball and beisboll.

“The ‘Washington Way’ has become the ‘Oregon Way,’” said Woodward. “We have competed to the best of our natural abilities, but there comes a time when you have to accept reality: Oregon is a consistently better program in the Pacific Northwest. I am calling upon all Washington students, alumni, Tyee Club members and fans in the Seattle metropolitan area to become lifelong supporters of the Oregon Ducks.”

Woodward announced that Tyee Club donations will be transferred to the Duck Athletic Fund and that a Duck Store outlet will be established on the University of Washington campus to sell Nike Duck gear in emerald green, yellow, black and gray to support UW’s new teams. “Mighty Oregon” will replace “Bow Wow Washington” as the official fight song for the University of Washington.

The Washington Athletic Director acknowledged that other uses will have to be found for Husky Stadium on Lake Washington and Alaska Airlines Arena to justify their recent $250 million+ upgrades. Benefit concerts featuring Justin Bieber, Barry Manilow and Donnie and Marie Osmond will be held as Husky Stadium this summer (dates TBD) to celebrate the strategic athletic outsourcing agreement.

Woodward said that the University of Oregon Athletic Department agreed as part of the MOU to seriously consider outgoing UW Football Coach Steve Sarkisian and UW Basketball Coach Lorenzo Romar and their respective staffs for future coaching, administrative and facilities vacancies at the University of Oregon Athletic Department.

“We appreciate this a very difficult day for the University of Washington administration, the UW Athletic Department, the Tyee Club members, alums, students and fans,” said University of Oregon Athletic Director Rob Mullens. “The University of Washington administration deserves credit for having the courage to initially approach the University of Oregon about the possibility of an athletic outsourcing agreement. We are humbled by the realization that we are representing two universities in Pac-12 play.”

Mullens said a portion of the transferred Tyee Fund donations will be used to expand the 54,000-seat Autzen Stadium to accommodate University of Washington students at the enhanced student section at University of Oregon home games. University of Washington football season ticket holders will have limited opportunities to buy seats at an enlarged Autzen Stadium.

autzen1

Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said the University of Washington will retain its membership in the Pac-12 conference as an “emeritus” university. Scott said he is open to the possibility of Oregon State University and Washington State University entering into similar MOUs with the University of Oregon resulting in the entire Pacific Northwest being represented on fields and courts by University of Oregon student athletes. Scott confirmed that Portland State University will be considered as a replacement conference member for the “emeritus” University of Washington.

Scott said the Oregon Ducks represented both the University of Oregon and University of Washington student bodies and respective university families in their Sweet 16 matchup against Louisville last Friday in the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament.

Safe Harbor Statement: This preliminary strategic Athletic Department Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) between the University of Washington and the University of Oregon is effective and duly constituted upon the playing of the “Sweet 16” game between the University of Oregon and the University of Louisville on March 29, 2013. All University of Washington athletic records with the exception of the men’s and women’s crew teams and the women’s gymnastics team will remain the official records of the University of Washington Athletic Department. They will be housed in the University of Washington Athletics Museum in which Washington fans can remember the days in which UW actually  fielded its own sports teams. A final Memoranda of Understanding will be consummated between the University of Washington and the University of Oregon later this calendar year. A corresponding MOU between the University of Washington and the Pacific-12 Conference designating an “emeritus” status for the University of Washington Athletic Department is expected to be signed in the next 90 days. None of the stipulations stated above should be constituted as a guarantee by the University of Washington administration or its agents.

About the University of Washington

Founded in 1861 by a private gift of 10 acres in what is now the heart of downtown Seattle, the UW is one of the oldest public universities on the West Coast. We’re deeply committed to upholding the responsibility that comes with that legacy. And being public has always meant being accessible. Anyone can enjoy and be enriched by all the UW has to offer, including world-class libraries, art, music, drama, sports and the highest quality medical care in Washington state. Being public also means being engaged with our communities, and through knowledge and discovery we are elevating the quality of lives of others. http://www.washington.edu/discover/

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon, founded in 1876, is the state’s flagship institution. Located in Eugene, an energetic college town, the university offers academic excellence and hands-on learning opportunities in a welcoming atmosphere. Towering trees shade the 295-acre campus, where students, faculty members, and employees from a wide variety of backgrounds share a commitment to preserving the environment and pursuing innovation in more than 260 academic programs that range from Eugene to Portland and from the coast to the mountains. http://uoregon.edu/about

http://espn.go.com/blog/pac12/post/_/id/54990/oregon-wins-this-pac-12-title

http://www.gohuskies.com/

http://www.goducks.com/

Upon announcement of his induction into the University of Oregon Athletics Hall of Fame Saturday night, the sellout crowd at Autzen Stadium gave Nike founder and über-UO donor Phil Knight a standing ovation.

The 99 percent were cheering, rather than jeering, a member of the despised 1 percent.

Class warfare and jealously were shelved for at least for a nanosecond or two.

And what ever happened to “Occupy Eugene,” let alone “Occupy Wall Street?”

The reason for the outpouring of appreciation was obvious: Never in recorded history have so many UO students, athletes and alums owed so much to one solitary man. He has given more than $300 million (and counting) to the school’s Athletic Department, including $100 million to the UO Athletics Legacy Fund.

unclephil

Academically, he contributed the lion’s share to the $27 million renovation to the UO Knight Library. The name of his late father and 1932 UO Law grad, William W. Knight, adorns the 68,000-square foot University of Oregon law school.

Knight’s generosity is not limited to the University of Oregon as he gave $105 million to the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he received his MBA. He has also directed $100 million to Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) for the Knight Cancer Institute, and most recently $125 million more to establish the OHSU Cardiovascular Institute.

In a society where we make so much of those who are “giving back,” why are we so insistent on “taxing the rich” (e.g., Phil Knight) to further grow the size, scope and gravitational pull of the federal government?

Is it fair to impose punitive taxation on successful entrepreneurs in which nothing is given, who have a great idea, and have the temerity to “Just Do It?” If one subscribes to the notion that the best anti-poverty program on the planet is a job, then $24 billion Nike is responsible for “stimulating” 44,000 direct jobs and oodles of indirect jobs. Investors have poured $43 billion into Nike’s market value, and the company has nearly $4 billion of cash on hand for future job-creating investments.

Back to our basic public policy question: Is it a swell idea to punitively raise the tax rate of successful entrepreneurs to make the government grander while retarding their investment and philanthropy endeavors? And will these additional revenues be used for deficit reduction or for more spending and borrowing (e.g. Solyndra II)?

If we agree to hike the highest federal income rate from 36 percent-to-39 percent, coupled with increasing the capital gains rate from 15 percent-to-30 percent, will these increases be sufficient to pacify the insatiable class warriors?

Consider that the top federal income tax rate was 70 percent under the “malaise” reign of James Earl Carter from 1977 to 1981. That rate sounds high and unreasonable (at least to some) until you consider the effective 98 percent rate under UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson in the 1970s. This level of confiscatory taxation even prompted the Beatles to write “Taxman,” and for the Rolling Stones to flee to France and record “Exile on Main Street.” See Almost DailyBrett https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2011/10/04/taxing-the-fab-four-exiling-the-stones/

Some will scoff at 98 percent taxation, but it happened in the industrialized country that shares a special class-warfare kinship with the United States. What is mind-boggling is the notion of one can earn $1 million and then only taking home about $70,000? Think of it this way, one could toil from January 1 to December 15 to pay the government, before starting to work for herself or himself.

Call me silly or naïve, but I humbly contend that we should be incentivizing entrepreneurs, such as Uncle Phil, to invest and donate and along the way create jobs. The static-scoring Keynesiologists will want me to stuff my dynamic-scoring “Laffer Curve” cocktail napkin where the sun doesn’t shine. They will demand that I and other like-minded individuals to simply accept the “inevitability” of “community” tax increases that foster more “investing” (e.g., code for spending and borrowing).

Wonder how many of those who were standing and applauding “Uncle Phil” for his contributions to his favorite university are deep down inside hoping our government gives it to him, and gives it to him good? I’m afraid that more than half of the stadium supports this exact policy.

As they say, “No good deed goes unpunished.”

http://www.registerguard.com/web/sports/28782173-41/oregon-hall-knight-fame-american.html.csp

http://www.celebritynetworth.com/richest-businessmen/ceos/phil-knight-net-worth/

http://www.forbes.com/profile/phil-knight/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Knight

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knight_Library

http://www.kgw.com/news/Phil–Penny-Knight-donate-125M-to-OHSU-170087396.html

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/608673-nikes-big-gift-phil-knight-and-the-university-of-oregon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Maynard_Keynes

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Laffer

Maybe the Heisman Trophy is not good enough for Matt Barkley?

Ditto for winning the National Championship and being the first pick in the 2013 NFL Draft?

Considering his works and deeds on-and-off the field (are there holes in his hands and feet?), maybe he should be canonized as a saint?

You say that someone must be deceased before he or she can be canonized? Details, details.

My point here is that the slovenly and slobbering media coverage has been uniformly glowing to the point it is already way beyond the point of being over the top. Does Barkley walk on water? Does he change water into wine? Does he part the friggin’ Red Sea?

NCAA Football: San Jose State vs USC SEP 5

There are … count em … 2.38 million Google results about Matt Barkley. He is on the cover of Sports Illustrated. Lindy’s chronicled Saint Matt leading 15 of his teammates heading off to Haiti last May to help the needy. He is a devout Christian. He passed up NFL riches this year to come back and save USC for one more year. Who needs Mother Teresa?

Playboy described him as the “Golden boy.” Mater Dei Matt would probably ask: “Playboy? What is Playboy?”… He really doesn’t want to know.

As I attempt to rationalize the 24/7/365 ESPN coverage of Matt Barkley with some sort of semblance of sanity, please understand that I actually graduated from USC with a degree in Broadcasting Journalism way back in the prior century, 1978. I have a very soft place in my heart for the Trojans, “Conquest,” the Song Girls and Traveler.

At the same time, I am free of the Southland’s polluted inversion layer which seems to cause people stuck on LA freeways to expect nothing less than annual national championships and Heisman Trophies.

As a public relations instructor, Master’s degree recipient and two-decade-plus football season ticket holder at the humbler University of Oregon, I have seen Barkley play live three times against the Ducks. Last year, Barkley torched Oregon for four touchdowns and one pick and 323-yards as the Trojans hung on 38-35 at Autzen Stadium in Eugene.

The previous year, Barkley’s stats were not so divine. He threw one touchdown and two picks (269 yards) against Oregon as the Ducks won 53-32, prompting Trojan fans to take early flight from the Los Angeles Mausoleum.

In Barkley’s first visit to Autzen in 2009, Barkley threw two touchdowns and one pick for 187 yards in a 47-20 frightening Halloween night loss to Oregon.

If you are scoring at home, these results translate into a career 1-2 record (7 TDs and 5 Picks) for Barkley vs. Oregon. He has the opportunity on November 3 back at the LA Mausoleum to even the score. And yet, there is this unprecedented Matt Barkley hyperventilation and histrionics emanating from the foaming-at-the-mouth sports media.

Let’s assume the awarding of the Heisman Trophy, the National Championship and the first pick in the 2013 NFL draft are all administrative acts as it applies to the over-celebrated Matt Barkley. What’s the logical next step?

Only one “person” has ever ascended into heaven and as the Good Book says; he was the son of God. Is Barkley the second son of God? That may be even too much for Matt Barkley.

assumption

How about the second Assumption? The Blessed Mary was assumed into heaven where she now hangs out with Ronald Reagan, Vince Lombardi and Steve Jobs. Why shouldn’t Barkley be the first male to be assumed into the heavens? He could get to know St. Peter on a first name basis.

Besides injecting some humor into Barkleymania, there is a reality here that he should remember: The media is the opposite of the Marine drill sergeant at Camp Pendleton. The Marines beat you down and then build you up as a Marine. The media can build you up as they have done Matt Barkley, but they would rather tear you down and spit you out.

Ask Tiger Woods, if you don’t believe me.

Always be on your guard, Mr. Barkley. Always be on your guard…even if you are assumed into heaven. There are critics everywhere, even there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canonization

http://www.motherteresa.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascension_of_Jesus

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assumption_of_Mary

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matt_Barkley

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/aug/15/sports/la-sp-0816-usc-football-20120816

oregon

“It (Football in the State of Oregon) can come back if the schools take the right step and improve the facilities,” – OSU Heisman Trophy Winner Terry Baker, Sporting News, 1986

“On average, the faculty likes it when the football team does better. And we understand that it takes some resources to attract the best people. But obviously we’re jealous when we see the difference between their facilities and the facilities we have for teaching,” UO economics professor Bill Harbaugh, Eugene Register-Guard, 2012

Is anyone nostalgic for the University of Oregon alumni tent set up in a gravel parking lot at Autzen Stadium?

How about wondering if the UO Athletic Department could scrap enough shekels together to pay the $125,000 guarantee to the visiting team?

Want to revisit those serious discussions about Oregon and Oregon State becoming members of the Big Sky Conference (i.e., visits to scenic Missoula, Bozeman and Pocatello)?

As a practicing Duckologist, I have steadfastly saved a well-worn copy of 1986 The Sporting News college football yearbook. Included in the issue is an article by former Oregonian sports columnist Nick Bertram describing the dreadful state of affairs for football in the State of Oregon.

Besides scrambling to pay the minimum to the visiting school, Oregon was averaging only 23,000 at Autzen Stadium. In fact, there was talk of putting a dome on Autzen. The Ducks were 23 years and counting since their last (Sun) bowl game, and 29 years since their last Rose Bowl. Next year, we will commemorate the 30th anniversary (“celebrate” is the wrong word) of the last scoreless game in NCAA football history, the 1983, 0-0 “Toilet Bowl” between Oregon and Oregon State.

The root of Oregon’s historic difficulties in recruiting, competing and winning, comes down to one word: Geography.

The nation’s 9th largest state in land mass is also one of the country’s least populated (3.4 million), isolated in America’s cul-de-sac and one of the rainiest. All of these factors worked against previous Oregon coaching regimes, including the one I served as a student manager in 1975 (e.g., Don Read et al.). USC, UCLA, Stanford, Cal, Arizona State and Washington do not face these same geographic obstacles.

The answers to unfavorable and unchangeable geography included targeting donor dollars to build the 101,000-square foot Casanova Center in 1991 to house the Athletic Department. They also consisted of finding recruiting diamonds in the rough by former Head Coaches Rich Brooks and Mike Bellotti; continuity of the coaching staff (five assistants with tenures exceeding two decades); and miraculously making the Rose Bowl in one special year in 1994. All of these accomplishments preceded the major involvement in the program by Uncle Phil.

If you do not know who is “Uncle Phil,” you should stop reading now.

Since that time, Oregon built the first indoor practice facility ($15 million) on the West Coast, directly addressing the rain issue, the 117,000 square-foot Moshofsky Center. Autzen was expanded to 54,000 and the stadium has been sold out for every game since 1999 with more than 60,000 being shoe-horned into the insane asylum by the Willamette. Back on campus, the university leased property at its main entrance to Phil Knight. In turn, he invested $41 million into an academic support center for student athletes and donated the John Jaqua Center back to the university.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This same out-of-the-box thinking: lease-build-donate plan is being used for the $68 million, 130,000-square foot football operations center, located adjacent to Autzen Stadium, the Moshofsky Center and the Casanova Center.

Oregon has come light years in the past 25 years, including winning the conference five more times since the 1994 Rose Bowl team. The Ducks are 34-6 in the last three years, including two visits to the Rose Bowl (winning this past January) and a trip to the BCS National Championship Game.

You would think everyone would be happy on campus by the success of the self-sufficient Athletic Department and “on average” that is the case, but jealousy still persists. Guess no good deed (or deeds) or achievement goes unpunished.

Some are now coming to the conclusion that college sports are big business. This point is evidenced by the debut this week of the Pac-12 network, which will provide $10 million in new revenue to each school’s athletic department. Some wonder if prime-time, college sports is inconsistent with the missions of great universities. They lament that an athletic arms race has ensued…and to some extent that is the case. It’s called competition.

There also has been an undeniable payoff that has benefitted academics as well. As a full-time instructor at the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication, I marvel at the number of students who wear the school colors to class. Success on the field and the court contributes to greater morale on campus and in the classroom.

Obviously, I note the expenditures for athletics (e.g., the $227 million Matthew Knight Arena and PK Park for the Oregon baseball team), but I also walk by virtually every day the William W. Knight Law School and the Knight Library. Uncle Phil has not only benefitted students who happen to be athletes, but regular students who are not athletes.

Certainly, not every building on campus is state of the art, but nonetheless some are striking including the Lillis School of Business and soon the ($15 million for 15,000 new square feet of space) newly renovated Allen Hall for the School of Journalism and Communication. I am looking forward to teaching at the new Allen Hall starting in the winter term.

Is there a direct connection between the success and national stature of the Oregon Ducks and the dramatic increase in enrollment and donations to Oregon? Some may try to argue against this point, but I will go to the mat saying there has to be a correlation. Ten years ago, 19,000 attended Oregon. Today, there are 25,000 students. The average incoming freshman GPA was a record 3.59 last year. There are more students; they are smarter and their retention rate is higher. Something absolutely Ducky is happening.

Oregon is a state-assisted university with only single digit percent of its total costs being provided from Salem. The rest has to come from tuition, fees and donations. Winning builds pride and that in turns spurs check writing from alums and fans. With some governments around the nation coming to the realization that the spending orgy is over, more needs to come from those who can contribute to their favorite school.

I went to Oregon back in the 1970s, but earned my bachelor’s degree in Broadcasting Journalism from USC. This past March, I received my master’s degree in Communication and Society from the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication. And 23 years ago, I bought Oregon season seats at Autzen Stadium. I have been a witness to the Golden Age of Oregon football and an upgrade in academics as well. That’s what I call a job well done.

Yep, I was an Oregon fan before it was cool.

http://www2.registerguard.com/cms/index.php/duck-football/comments/lights-go-up-today-on-pac-12s-tv-network-era/

http://harbaugh.uoregon.edu/

http://www.registerguard.com/web/newslocalnews/28375820-41/center-football-athletics-university-knight.html.csp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Baker

http://www.ehow.com/info_8144923_history-sports-scholarships.html

Every fall game day, I have a sacred routine.

My pilgrimage starts by walking over the Willamette River knowing that one day my ashes will be thrown off the footbridge into the north flowing current. Soon thereafter I will be partying with friends in the Moshofsky Center (Oregon’s indoor practice facility). Then about 45 minutes before kickoff, it will be time to head into the game. And finally, the three hours-plus of intensity and passion that comes from a no-holds barred game in the friendly confines of Autzen Stadium.

autzen2

I have it all figured out, or do I?

My best friend’s son, who loves college football as much as me, will almost never go to a stadium, any stadium. Presumably, he begins his autumn Saturdays with ESPN’s “College Game Day,” followed by a series of jousts at noon Eastern, and then the first set of west coast contests at 3:30 pm Eastern, and then the featured Saturday night epics at 8 pm Eastern and finally the late West Coast bouts at 10:15 pm Eastern. To wrap it up, he checks out ESPN “Sports Center” to cap off the day.

Does he appreciate what he is missing? Or is it me who doesn’t know what I am missing?

This coming August 15, the Pac-12 Conference will join the other major conferences (e.g., Big 10) in debuting its own network, ensuring that every football, men’s and women’s basketball game of each conference school is televised in high definition with superior video and audio. As welcome as the universal access to all of your alma mater’s games may be, it brings up an obvious question:

Why go to the game?

When I first purchased my Oregon season seats, 15 rows behind the opponent’s bench near the 30-yard line back in 1990; maybe…just maybe…one Oregon game would be televised each year. ABC had a virtual hammer lock on college football and only televised the glamour teams, but that quickly changed with cable.

Even with that change, perhaps four or five Oregon games would be televised each year in standard definition and those were usually the games against teams from the large media markets (e.g., USC, UCLA, Washington, Stanford, Cal). Now all of the games are televised in high definition, including this year’s body-bag game with Tennessee Tech.

The ones-and-zeroes mastery of digital television teamed with telecommunication satellite technology and HDTV with LED, LCD and plasma screens resulted in a viewer experience that absolutely blows away standard definition. We can now actually see the puck during Stanley Cup playoffs. Many times the problem with progress is the unintended consequences.

Even the staid Economist this week noted that better television broadcasts combined with escalating ticket prices have resulted in the NFL seeing a drop off in its attendance.

This perfect storm has to cause even the most devoted fan (I qualify) to question spending $1,000 to participate in the Duck Athletic Fund (substitute your own school’s athletic supporter fund), and then spending $81 or more per seat for the best games (e.g., $345 each for the BCS National Championship game) for the privilege of standing up for the entire game in either 94-degree heat or 32-degree freezing temps. And let’s not forget the slow crawl home with 60,000-plus of your most intimate friends.

Sure, the live game includes marching bands with fight songs and ornamental cheer leaders or as the late (ABC college football announcer) Chris Schenkel said, “What better way to spend an autumn afternoon.” Well, there is an option even for the most devoted fan.

The alternative is the living room with superior sound and picture. The game is free. There is no line for the bathroom. It is easy to dash during a time out for your personal refrigerator. The networks provide replays of key plays for not only the game you are watching, but for all of the other big games. Heck, you can even watch two games at once with picture in picture technology.

espncamera

Maybe this conundrum has prompted many professional franchises and college athletic departments to go slow (e.g., Oregon) in expanding the capacity of their respective stadia or in certain cases actually reduced the capacity (e.g., Stanford). Too many seats (supply) can depress demand (fans), while too few seats (supply) may stimulate demand (fans). Call this the Beanie Baby effect.

Perfect examples in beisboll are the Chicago Cubs (e.g., Wrigley Field), the Boston Red Sox (e.g., Fenway Park) and the San Francisco Giants (e.g., AT&T Park). In contrast, the Oakland Athletics have too many seats in the Oakland Coliseum, prompting the franchise to cover whole sections with embarrassing tarps. How’s that for “Money Ball?”

Oregon has sold out every game at 54,000 seat Autzen Stadium (60,000 with standing room) since 1999. And as long as the Ducks keep winning (e.g., three straight conference championships and three straight BCS bowl games), Oregon fans will pack Autzen even when Tennessee Tech comes a calling. But what happens (and it’s inevitable) when some sub par seasons creep into the mix? It wasn’t that long ago when the Ducks were weak sisters and they were not seen as ultra cool. I don’t want to see a fall off, but I have to be reasonable.

Will hardy fans be tempted to follow their team (and college football in general) by means of the superior quality and convenience of HDTV? The Pac-12 network will reportedly bring up to $30 million in additional revenue to each of the dozen schools in the conference. That is good news to the green eyeshade crowd. One must wonder long term whether this influx of cash will be counterbalanced by dwindling attendance in the face of high ticket prices and awesome high definition sound and picture.

Doesn’t that sound like an unintended consequence?

http://www.economist.com/node/21555606

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Schenkel

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pac-12_Network

http://blogs.mercurynews.com/collegesports/2012/05/20/pac-12-network-what-it-worth-heres-one-projection/

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/budwithers/2018252077_withers21.html

http://world.ty.com/catalog/catPage.cfm?status=Current&lineid=3

(Damon) Huard is back to throw the ball. Sets up. Looks. Throws toward the corner of the end zone. It’s intercepted. Intercepted. The Ducks have the ball. Now it’s to the 35. The 40. Kenny Wheaton is going to score. Kenny Wheaton is going to score. Twenty. The 10. Touchdown. Kenny Wheaton on the interception. The most improbable finish to the football game. – Voice of the Ducks Jerry Allen calling the “Pick” against the Washington Huskies, October 22, 1994

wheaton

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sbs00B7fqJU

For every Oregon Duck fan, time simply stopped; maybe for only a few seconds…We all took a mental photo of that moment at Autzen Stadium, made all the sweeter because the opponent was the hated Washington Huskies. The “Pick” paved the way to the Ducks going to the Rose Bowl and it officially ushered in the Golden Age of Oregon football.

Yes, my mom told me to never use the h-verb. Sorry mumsy no other word works just as well in this case. I know Washington fans harbor the same feelings about Oregon, particularly since the Ducks won the Rose Bowl and have recorded an unprecedented eight straight wins over the Huskies. We were pleased as punch to shut down Husky Stadium for a year with a resounding 34-17 win over the Dawgs as their demoralized fan-base filed out of the antiquated stadium on the lake.

Washington fans are now yearning for the NCAA to crucify Oregon for the questionable use of recruiting services, maybe evening the score for the Dawgs’ years of “Lack of Institutional Control” probation back in the 1990s. Oregon fans are hoping for a slap on the wrist. Most likely the verdict is going to be somewhere in between…pleasing neither side.

As a resident Duckologist, I can attest to actual conversations over adult beverages in which Duck fans were debating which was preferable: Going 1-11 and beating the Huskies or going 13-1, winning the Rose Bowl or the BCS National Championship, and losing to the Huskies? It is a nip-and-tuck on that one. What was not a close call was the one-year absence from the rivalry in 2001 because of the Pac-10 round robin at the time…Never again.

All of this foreplay brings up a question that makes increasing sense as college football undergoes titanic changes, including major conference realignments and maybe even a plus-one playoff to determine the national championship. Why not have the Ducks and Dawgs play each other to wrap up each season?

thomas

Sorry Civil War (Oregon vs. Oregon State). Sorry Apple Cup (Washington vs. Wazzu). These games still matter, but they can be played during the middle of the season. They just will not be the season ending games. That is actually the case for Stanford vs. Cal, which will be played on October 20 because of a Pac-12 scheduling quirk. There is actual precedent that paves the way for this meaningful change.

This coming season as is the custom in all seasons, Michigan will play in-state rival Michigan State on October 20. The maize and blue with its traditional uniforms concludes each season by playing its bitter rival, Ohio State, on November 24. It is simply known as Ohio State vs. Michigan…nothing more needs to be said…everyone in Ann Arbor and Columbus understands the significance of these three-plus hours that come only once a year. If you are a Buckeye or Wolverine fan, you know exactly what you will be doing at that precise time one year in advance. If your team loses, it is a long year to wait for the next chance. No other sport dictates your personal future schedule like college football.

Oregon vs. Washington. Duck fans and Washington fans instinctively sense what this game means, a rivalry that has been renewed 104 times and goes back to 1900. When asked which was a bigger rival by the Oregonian last November, Oregon fans chose Washington by a 59-to-41 percent margin over Oregon State. Admittedly, the poll was taken the week of the Dawg game, but that still does not make up the nearly 20 percent differential between Duck fans choosing the Huskies over the Beavs as the #1 rival. Oregon fans are for the most part amused by Oregon State. Washington conjures up thoughts of big city arrogance and the so-called, “Washington Way.”

sp.wheaton.2.jpg

The drive from Eugene to Seattle is 288 miles straight up I-5. The distance between Seattle and Pullman is 285 miles. The two venues are equidistant for the Huskies, but there is little doubt which opponent stirs more passion for those who wear purple and yellow as standard attire.

Will there be opposition to this proposal? Certainly. The land grant negative vibes will come from Corvallis and Pullman, but the Beavs and the Cougs can play their “rivalry” game on the last day of the season as well. The winner will garner the Golden Fleece award. Wonder if the fleece will be nervous?

http://www.oregonlive.com/ducks/index.ssf/2011/11/oregon-ducks-football-poll-tuesday.html

http://www.4malamute.com/borderwar.html

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/huskies/2016658841_ducks01.html

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/924638-oregon-ducks-football-five-reasons-to-hate-the-huskies

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/922185-who-is-oregons-biggest-rival-washington-or-oregon-state

http://www.thepantheronline.com/sports/the-evergreen-eyed-monster-1.2690660

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