Tag Archive: Binary Code


“This person is an idiot … Perfect for Ph.D candidacy”

“This whole blog is an audition for a commentator position on Fox News! If so, well-played, sir. Your inability to look past the length of your nose and complete lack of logic make you a shoo-in.”

“I’m puking in my mouth.

“Total Douche-o-Rama.”

gtf

Maybe this Perfect Idiot Douche-o-Rama should compete for a doctorate?

Or a pundit on Fox News?

Never in recorded history has a humble blog drawn so much vitriol when the stakes were so low.

At Least The Name Was Spelled Right

Far worse than being misquoted is not being quoted at all.” – Former Presidential Communications Director Pat Buchanan

“Communicators need to learn how to handle the hecklers on social media.  It is now a required skill. I know of two agencies and three Silicon Valley companies who include this in their pre-employment tests. What a great real-life example to show them (students)!“ — Colleen Pizarev, PR Newswire Vice President

Writing a provocative blog (e.g., Almost DailyBrett) is not for the meek and mild. My December 3 post about the recent strike by the Graduate Teaching Fellows (GTF) at the University of Oregon is a case in point. Fortunately, the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation union (GTFF) finally caved in to the university and no further damage was done to the school’s 25,000 students and/or faculty.

If one is not willing to venture an opinion and take calculated chances, then why write a blog in the first place? Think of it this way: A blog is the most discretionary of all reads.

There is a huge difference between being provocative-controversial and being notorious. The first is responsible; the latter, irresponsible.

So what are the best ways to respond to online hecklers, yes even those who take issue with: “Your tactics here are a clear sign of your ignorance and privilege”?_MG_1292 (3)

 

Dem’s fighting words, but one must pick her-or-his battles.

Taking the High Road

The juvenile level of discourse you’ve displayed in these comments makes me embarrassed that you have a degree from my alma mater (e.g., M.A. from the University of Oregon).”

What are effective strategies when it comes to responding to the most determined of online hecklers?

  1. Avoid Writing Blogs When Upset and Frustrated in the First Place

There are times when you want to give someone or some organization a piece of your mind. That is not the time to write a blog. Your posts need to be thoughtful and based upon concrete facts to back your assertions. This is not to say that you cannot be provocative and controversial. Most blogs do not draw comments, generate Facebook “shares” and/or cause fur to fly. Every once in awhile this is indeed the case

  1. Never Engage in a Public Urination Contest

Learn how to be offensive without being OFFENSIVE. Dirty Harry (e.g., Clint Eastwood) always expressed his point of view (sometimes with his .44 Magnum), but most of the time he went just a tad too far. For a blogger you can respond to the heckler and parry back the verbal volleys, but you should never lose your cool and engage in a public urination battle. The results will not be pretty. There are times you want to engage the heckler, and there are others when you want to leave unanswered the charge/allegation. Your pride is not injured, if you allow the heckler to have the last word.Dirty Harry (1971)

 

  1. Pick and Choose Your Battles

The intent of the heckler is to bully, intimidate and silence dissent. Some are just not used to anyone standing up to them. We all have the First Amendment of Free Speech. A blogger has just as much right to compete in the Marketplace of Ideas as anyone else. If the heckler resorts to childish name calling, utters ugly slurs or demonstrates racist, sexist or other nasty behavior, it is best to NOT post that individual’s comments and to disengage.

  1. Allow the Heckler to Build Your SEO, Then Disengage

Keep in mind, the heckler is doing you the blogger a huge favor. The search engines (e.g., bots) take note of digital activity … the ones and zeroes of binary code … flowing to-and-from your blog URL. Every foray from the heckler can be met in kind with a witty and/or clever reply. For you this is a victory in the SEO (Search Engine Optimization) arena. Let the invectives fly across cyberspace.

  1. Always Take the High Road

Turning the other cheek results in two throbbing cheeks even in the online space. Engaging the heckler to demonstrate that your dissent will not be silenced is noble, provided you are cool, calm and collected … and always take the high road. Remember: You wrote the blog. The heckler(s) is/are responding. As the instigator, you are the one driving the story.

  1. Don’t Lose Any Sleep

As a tadpole, you learned some variation of “sticks and stones will break my bones … “ These wise words still apply all of these decades later. Get a good night’s sleep. Maybe your next blog will draw even more hecklers.

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/are-striking-uo-graduate-teaching-fellows-certifiable/

http://www.prnewsonline.com/water-cooler/2012/07/27/5-tips-for-dealing-with-hecklers-on-twitter/

http://www.problogger.net/archives/2008/03/09/how-to-deal-with-blog-hecklers/

 

Once upon a time the best and the brightest were convinced without any conceivable doubt: The world is flat.

They were so sure they were right … err correct … until this guy … (should I mention his name?) … Christopher Columbus proved them to be wrong. At least that is what we were taught in school.

columbus

Score one for a new way of seeing our world.

Sometimes it is difficult to overcome well entrenched, stubborn, resolute and mule-like analog thinking.

This also applies to the prevailing wisdom about one-page resumes taught by some journalism and communication professors/instructors.

Contemplating parochial school lessons emanating from the Baltimore Catechism, one learned that the Ten Commandments were handed down from on high to Moses (e.g., played by Charlton Heston). One still remembers the sketches of Moses holding up the tablets and instructing the masses to avoid killing people, refrain from stealing someone else’s possessions, and never-ever committing adultery against one’s spouse and/or mistress.

hestonmoses

Alas, I never found anything chiseled in rock declaring that any-and-all curriculum vitaes (e.g., resumes) being restricted to one page, and only one page. And yet I keep on meeting cowering-and-quivering college students who have been bludgeoned into reducing fonts, running on sentences and cramming and jamming as much as they can into one eight-by-eleven inch piece of paper to comply with those who proclaim that all resumes must be in one-page Ordnung. Verstehen Sie? You better.

Let me engage a little heresy here at the risk of being excommunicated and never being allowed to fill my growler ever again.

Has anyone in the leadership of the majority of these journalism schools ever heard of binary code? Yep, these are those itsy, bitsy, teeny, weeny digital on-and-off instructions that are forever changing the world, including journalism as we know it, whether we like it or not.

Want to look up Moore’s Law? Maybe you shouldn’t.

Why does the irreversible global shift from analog-to-digital matter when it comes to resumes or CVs? The reason is that each-and-every resume for any high five-figure or any six-figure job or above, and with increasingly frequency entry-level positions as well, is submitted online. Does it really matter if the CV is one page, if the words are being transmitted and reviewed electronically…sometimes by a human and other times by a machine?

SEO Perfect Company

Is the length more important than content? Both the human and the search engine are calibrated to search out certain words that fit the job description (Hint: “Really working well with people” doesn’t cut it).

Instead when it comes to public relations, marketing, investor relations and communications, the search engine as in search engine optimization or SEO is looking for the following and more:

  • Message Development
  • Social Media
  • Employee Communications
  • Search Engine Optimization
  • Search Engine Marketing
  • Crisis Communications
  • Investor Relations
  • Media Relations
  • Analyst Relations
  • Media Training
  • Multimedia Skills
  • Presentation Skills

Does it matter if the search engine spots these terms and others on one page or more? Almost DailyBrett humbly contends that content reigns supreme, not length, particularly in our digital age.

Keep in mind that many employers are now asking for LinkedIn profile URLs instead of resumes at least when it comes to online applications. Are the J-School Pharisees asking for LinkedIn profiles to be restricted to one page? Is this possible considering that LinkedIn profiles are exclusively online?

Shhhh! … Let’s not give them any ideas.

A final thought comes to mind, and maybe the most important one of all: Are all graduating seniors created equal?

One of the most common arguments advanced by the Flat Earth, One-Page Resume Society is that college seniors don’t have enough experience and educational accomplishments to require more than one page. They have the semblance of an argument here.

resume1

The Almost DailyBrett response is that some seniors overachieve and outperform compared to their colleagues. They have oodles of internships, jobs, relevant activities and skill sets in addition to their education (e.g., B.A. or B.S. degree). For them, it is extremely difficult to tell their entire story to prospective employers on only one page.

Why should we arbitrarily penalize the overachievers?

Besides the cover letters and the CVs that they ultimately transmit (think binary ones and zeroes) to would-be employers are ultimately their OWN cover letters and their resumes. Graduating seniors are adults. They will make their own decisions. They will rise and fall based upon what they upload. Let them decide.

They should not be handcuffed by yesterday’s analog thinking.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myth_of_the_Flat_Earth

http://www.biography.com/people/christopher-columbus-9254209

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curriculum_vitae

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_code

http://www.catholicity.com/baltimore-catechism/

http://christianity.about.com/od/biblestorysummaries/p/tencommandstory.htm

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/history/museum-gordon-moore-law.html

http://searchengineland.com/guide/what-is-seo

Some of us celebrate our diversity.

For decades we have used the metaphor “melting pot” to describe America.

California Governor Jerry Brown in his first go-around as the state’s chief executive even labeled the Golden State as a “mosaic” to describe the various ethnicities, creeds and orientations that populate the left coast state.

mosaic

And yet a mosaic is a series of pieces, separated by channels of grout. Each one is separate and distinct from the other. We may talk about diversity and mosaics, but in reality aren’t we really just part of the segments that comprise The Segmentation Society?

Can this realization be the root of our inability to come together for a common cause? And when we do (e.g., immediate aftermath of September 11), this camaraderie does not last long.

And if anything aren’t we championing the brilliance of those who make the most hay out of segments…err…demographics? Are you listening David Alexrod?

Barack Obama won a second term putting together a blue-state coalition that included so many  black, yellow, brown, young, secular, single-female mosaic pieces. The other chips of broken china need not apply.

Eight years earlier, George W. Bush won his own second term through the assembly of a red-state coalition that included so many white, brown, older, religious, married-female mosaic pieces. The other pieces were not necessary to complete the Electoral-College puzzle. Are you listening Karl Rove?

For the shrinking-in-influence news media, particularly those on cable television, the lucrative answer to The Segmentation Society has been to turn to the polemics.

The Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media 2013 report pointed to growing trend toward editorial rather than reportorial content. MSNBC on the left “leads” the way with 85 percent of its 2007-2012 content being opinion or commentary with only 15 percent being straight news. Fox News on the right devotes 55 percent of its airtime on opinion and commentary with 45 percent for hard news. CNN wins or loses (e.g. low Nielsen ratings) this contest with 46 percent opinion and commentary and 54 for news gathering.

oreilly

Amplifying the point, Pew reported that MSNBC owned by Comcast directed only $240 million for news gathering, while Fox News run by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation devotes the cable industry leading $820 million for reporting.

Fox News president Roger Ailes made the correct business decision that conservatives were an underserved segment and wanted a network that met their needs. Enter Sean Hannity, Glenn Beck and on occasion, Bill O’Reilly.

MSNBC saw itself as the liberal counterweight to Fox News and bludgeons conservatives by means of the tender mercies of Lawrence O’Donnell, Rachel Maddow, Ed Schultz, Chris Matthews and at one time, the fair and “balanced” Keith Olbermann.

Rachel%20Maddow%2008_grid-4x2

Elections are won picking up segments (demographics) and tossing them into the electoral shopping cart.

Networks reel in the dough as if it was manna from heaven by throwing editorial and commentary red meat to the true believers whether they be aligned with the left or the right. It really doesn’t matter as long as confiscatory advertising rates can be charged

To the public relations community, which according to Pew now has a 3.6 to 1.0 ratio “advantage” over the remaining journalists, the goal is to use conventional and digital means to reach the stakeholders…the targeted segments.

In choreographing a public relations campaign is the goal to identify the segment or to craft the message that appeals to the segment…or both?

Social media outlets with their trusty algorithms allow us to segment ourselves through our key strokes and send related ads to the right side of our Facebook page. Whether we like it or not (most would say “not”), we just pigeonholed ourselves.

And each time we pigeonhole ourselves, we place ourselves into an ever narrower portion of the pie or bar chart. We are individuals after all with our own particular DNA and cell structures.

This is all brings us back to the original point. Should we be celebrating diversity? Should we hold out that we can all come together for common good? Or should we realize that majority rule means using digital tools…the ones and zeroes of binary code…to reach those demographics, mosaic pieces, segments…that are most likely to buy the product or pull the lever?

It seems that train has already left that station, if you don’t mind one more metaphor.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffbercovici/2013/03/18/pew-study-finds-msnbc-the-most-opinionated-cable-news-channel-by-far/

http://stateofthemedia.org/2013/overview-5/

%d bloggers like this: