Tag Archive: Charlie Watts


In your author’s teenage years, there was only one item on the bucket list: See the Rolling Stones live before buying the ranch.

Last week, Almost DailyBrett was digging down/smashing the piggy bank (choose whatever metaphor works best) to purchase two precious pieces of card-board with the quintessential QR (quick response) bar code for the band’s upcoming “No Filter” tour.

If you are scoring at home, the May 12 Vancouver, BC show (e.g., BC Place) will be your author’s seventh time getting satisfaction, once again checking off my bucket list, the “Greatest Rock n’ Roll Band in the World.” And for the first time, seeing the Stones outside the friendly confines of the United States.

Who says you can’t always get what you want? Sometimes you even get what you need.

Growing up in the 1960s, the raggedy Stones featured an edge and a rhythm and blues sound the Beatles did not possess. Some contend the Beatles were the best ever. Others opt for the Stones. Macht nichts!

Let the eternal Baby Boomer arguments continue.

Approaching six decades on the road, the Stones are touring here and now. Incredibly pricey tickets are available for 15 stadium shows from San Diego to Pittsburgh and from Austin to Atlanta.

There is a certain risk that comes from seeing the Stones here and now, and its not because this tour could be the Last Time.

From a public relations standpoint, it’s wise to not announce a farewell tour because any aging performer/band (e.g., Michael Jordan, Katarina Witt) can change their minds. There is always a danger when a way-too-mature band can no longer bring it and still charges top dollar (e.g., see Almost DailyBrett’s B.B. King post).

This tour may indeed be the last simply because of the sands of time (i.e., Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood turn 78 and 73 respectively in June, Mick Jagger is 77 in July and Keith Richards is 77 as well in December). As long as the Stones can still perform their magic, particularly with an energetic Mick Jagger prancing the stage to the riffs of Sympathy for the Devil, whatever price they charge is … more than fair.

A prime example is the incredible Blu-Ray of the Stones Havana Moon concert March 25, 2016. Just as the Stones were finally given permission to play Shanghai, the Cuban government allowed the band to play a free concert that drew anywhere between 200,000 to 1 million souls (no turn styles … no problem).

What’s The Over/Under On The Stones?

“I love the man 99 percent of the time.” — Keith Richards on Mick Jagger

Almost DailyBrett is not objective when it comes to the legacy, the legend, and the earned place in history of the ‘Greatest Rock n’ Roll Band in the World.’ After six live concerts, at least 12 DVDs of performances/documentaries and more than 20 CDs spread over five decades, it’s impossible for your author to be fair and unbiased when it comes to assessing the Stones.

With this consumer warning in mind, your author contends the Rolling Stones are a huge net positive when it comes to their historical impact on global society.

Certainly there were well-documented legal troubles in the 1960s, including the highly publicized drug busts. Your author earlier  wrote about the public relations disaster associated with the December 1969 “free” concert at Altamont, when someone, anyone in authority needed to simply say ‘no,’ … but didn’t.

The Hells Angels were hired to provide “security” and they brought their pool cues to make sure no one touched their Harley Davidsons parked in front of the make-shift stage.

There was the infamous Mick-Keith feud in the 1980s, which almost tore the band apart … but thankfully, they kissed and kind of made up. Mick and Keith are smart enough to know they need each other, and the Stones’ passionate fans demand they stay together (Mick or Keith solo albums don’t sell).

When your author went online last Wednesday for the Rolling Stones presale at precisely 10 am PST, there were already 2,000 folks in the digital queue. ‘What the …. “. There is little doubt the Stones after five-plus decades on the road will fill to capacity all 15 stadiums on the upcoming tour. What other band is as relevant as ever and maintains staying power after more than five decades in the business?

Do the Stones need the money? Not really. Is their legacy secure. You bet ya. Why continue? They truly love what they do.

“I want to touch as many people as I can.” — Stones philosopher Keith Richards

The Stones have made millions of people night after night … “Happy,” to quote a song title. Upwards to 1 million will check out the continuation of the “No  Filter” tour this spring/summer.

Will the Stones finish each concert with a series of knockout songs that no mere mortals can match, such as for the last stop on the 2019 tour in Miami? The list: Miss You, Paint It Black, Midnight Rambler, Start Me Up, Brown Sugar, and encores Gimme Shelter and I Can’t Get No Satisfaction.

If they come anywhere close to this lineup of songs and play with their customary energy and sound, Almost DailyBrett and about 54,000 of his most intimate friends will be achieving Satisfaction, swirling in a rock n’ roll Crossfire Hurricane.

https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/the-rolling-stones/2019/hard-rock-stadium-miami-gardens-fl-639f6e8f.html

https://nypost.com/2016/05/11/mick-jagger-and-keith-richards-cant-stand-each-other/

Keith Richards on his relationship with Mick Jagger: “I love the man 99% of the time”

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2017/04/09/gathering-moss-for-five-decades/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2015/06/03/satisfaction/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2016/12/04/you-cant-always-get-what-you-want/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2012/11/25/the-permanency-of-altamont/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2013/03/11/the-thrill-is-almost-gone/

 

 

 

“We all know what’s wrong with each other, and what is right with each other.” – Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts on his three four-decade-plus colleagues

“Love is patient, love is kind … It keeps no record of wrongs … It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” — 1 Corinthians 13:4-8

Almost DailyBrett is not suggesting the Rolling Stones – Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood — love each other.

The 1980s feud between Mick and Keith almost tore the band apart.

Mild-mannered Charlie once decked Mick after the latter signed a solo recording contract, and started touring without his fellow Rolling Stones.

Regardless, your author notes the four members of the widely proclaimed and regarded “Greatest Rock ‘n Roll Band in the World” have been together for 42 years, and three-of-the-original five (i.e., Jagger, Richards and Watts) have prevailed for an amazing 55 years as a still-relevant force in music, culture and at times, international relations.

Are the Rolling Stones a net plus or a net minus for humanity? This hopelessly biased blog takes the “over.”

As Keith Richards is fond of saying, his job is to touch as many people as he can.

Mission accomplished. The Stones have touched and made happy literally millions around the world from London to Perth and from Shanghai (e.g., March 2014) to Havana (March 2016). The latter two reflected a marked relaxation of political/societal norms in Marxist China and Cuba, and provided a glimmer of hope for greater freedoms in these countries.

Of course, not everything in the career of the Rolling Stones has been rosy. Almost DailyBrett commented on the organizational and humanitarian disaster at Altamont in 1969 when someone – anyone – needed to say ‘no’ to a free, totally disorganized free concert for 400,000 people with the Hell’s Angels serving as the Praetorian Guards.

There is the good. There is the bad. The band members do not love each other. How do they stay together?

“Closest of Brothers”?

“Mick’s album was called ‘She’s the Boss,’ which said it all. I’ve never listened to the entire thing al the way through. Who has? It’s like ‘Mein Kampf. Everybody had a copy, but nobody listened to it.” – Guitarist Keith Richards in his memoirs, “Life”

“Mick and I may not be friends – too much wear and tear for that – but we’re the closest of brothers, and that can’t be severed … Nobody else can say anything against Mick that I can hear. I’ll slit their throat.” – Keith Richards on Mick Jagger

Almost DailyBrett must interject for a nanosecond and ask: How many relationships of highly accomplished, high ego lads (or ladies) can stay together for five-plus decades?

As Charlie said there are definitely things wrong with each member of the Rolling Stones, but more importantly there are more things that are right. Human nature unfortunately gravitates toward the negative, but it is the positive that keeps people together and on track.

In organizations, sometimes the best candidate is the internal candidate. But isn’t that same person undermined by the fact that he or she did something wrong during the course of performing the job?

Some critic must point out this transgression or that failing. The internal candidate may be the best person for the job. And yet someone remembers the fault, and the organization subsequently hires someone outside and maybe prompting the internal candidate to leave.

Who are the most apt violators of “Love is Patient, Love is Kind”? You guessed it: Families.

For some reason, diplomacy goes right out the window as family members contend they are obligated to point out another family member’s transgression without any attempt to utilize tact and diplomacy.

As Almost DailyBrett has repeatedly asked: “If they were not your relatives, would they be your friends?”

The Rolling Stones are not related to each other, but as Keith has suggested they are the closest of brothers. Charlie has added that they are so close that they know each other’s faults, but more importantly their positives.

How much longer the Stones will tour, record, exhibit and break down barriers? Only Father Time will tell. Charlie is 75. Mick and Keith are 73. Ronnie is the “youngster” at 69.

Almost DailyBrett can only surmise that as long as their collective health is decent; they still have the fire in their bellies, and they do not keep a record of wrongs: Time Very Well Will Be On Their Side.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+Corinthians+13:4-8

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/event/article-2345279/Mick-Jagger-Keith-Richards-feud-nearly-broke-Rolling-Stones.html

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2012/11/25/the-permanency-of-altamont/

KHJ radio in Los Angeles was cranked to the max for our Boy Scout campout in 1965.

I thought, What’s with this fuzz guitar, the incredible beat, and this singer with all the moves?

stonesearly

Fast forward 47 years and I am still not tired of probably the most famous double-negative in music history, “I Can’t Get No Satisfaction.”

That particular Boy Scout campout also began my lifelong quest to hear the song live with Keith Richards laying down the riffs, Charlie Watts keeping time on the drums and Mick Jagger belting out the vocals. I went twice to the “Fabulous” Forum in Los Angeles (Inglewood to be precise) in 1975 (Tour of the Americas) in search of “Satisfaction.” Aaron Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man” served as the intro for the Stones and about 20 songs, sandwiched by “Honky Tonk Women” and “Sympathy for the Devil.” Jagger swung (literally) off the ceiling of the Forum, and yet there was no “Satisfaction.”

The next try for “Satisfaction” came almost a generation later in 1999 (No Security Tour) at the San Jose Arena. Ronnie Wood was the lead guitarist and bass player Bill Wyman had quit the band. These Stones had gathered some moss, but they still could deliver about 22 songs including Bob Dylan’s “Just Like a Rolling Stone,” but still I couldn’t get no “Satisfaction.” I was now a big “O” for three.

Long ago, I came to the conclusion that my lack of hops and small hands would permanently preclude me from ever dunking a basketball. Did I also have to face a life with no “Satisfaction?”

My fourth try for “Satisfaction” was 2002 at the Oakland Arena (Licks Tour). The Stones were about half-way through their show, when Keith laid on the first riffs of Satisfaction. The crowd instinctively sprung to its feet. Mick did not have to sing the words; everyone knew them.

I had finally achieved “Satisfaction.” It was orgasmic.

Since then, I have seen the Stones two more times, AT&T Park in San Francisco in 2005, and the Oakland Coliseum in 2006 (A Bigger Bang Tour), climaxing two more times with “Satisfaction.” If there is a Stones tour next year as rumored to celebrate five decades as the greatest rock n’ roll band on the planet, I will not be attending a show but making a pilgrimage.

Periodically, I am asked why I am such a Rolling Stones freak (six concerts, about 10 DVDs, more than 20 CDs, all the old albums in wax, the notorious tongue poster hangs beside Ronald Reagan in my man cave). The follow-up question usually asks, Why Mick and Keith and not John and Paul?

The answer is that I like the Beatles, always have. The opening chords of “Day Tripper” immediately get me revved up. “Abbey Road” is one of my favorite CDs. I still haven’t figured out “A Day in the Life,” much less “I am the Walrus.”

When considering the question of the Stones and Beatles (I always list them in this order), one has to explore the roots. The Stones grew up listening to Muddy Waters (origin of the band’s name), John Lee Hooker, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Robert Johnson, and Solomon Burke. The result is a much more rhythm-and-blues oriented band. The Beatles by contrast were influenced heavily by Elvis Presley and Buddy Holly. The blues make me swoon.

Another differentiator is Mick Jagger, himself. Nobody is blasé about Mick. He is one of the greatest showmen of his era. There is the magnetism of Mr. Jumpin Jack Flash himself. And yet, you cannot examine him alone as Keith Richards (one half of The Glimmer Twins) will always be part of the Stones story.

The Beatles stopped touring the mid-1960s. The Stones invented the rock n’ roll show in 1969 and became more innovative and outrageous as the years went by. My favorite CD hails from the 1969 tour, “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out,” recorded that November from Madison Square Garden.

stones69

Alas, a Beatles fan can only remember. Sadly, John and George are gone. There will be no more tours, only reissues of songs in different technology formats that we have already heard a gazillion times.

A Stones tour is always the subject of intense rumors. Where will the play? From the 400 songs in the band’s repository, which ones will make the set list? Will we achieve “Satisfaction” or not?

And today, July 12, 2012, we commemorate the 50th anniversary of founding of the Rolling Stones. We all wish we could have been at the Marquee Club on London’s Oxford Street to hear the first gig of the Stones. I was only seven years old at the time, growing up in a coal mining town in Western Pennsylvania. I was simply too young and too far away.

177399_10151042838078287_1165543580_o[1]

The most important point as we celebrate the band today is the fact that the Stones are still Rolling. Three of the original five (Mick, Keith and Charlie) are still playing. No other rock n’ roll band has stayed present (e.g., tours and CDs) and relevant for five decades. The Stones easily could have hung up the guitar picks and drum sticks literally years ago with bank accounts full and legacy intact. And yet they continue to bring joy to our lives.

They also seem to still get a charge out of what they do.

“I know it’s only rock ‘n roll, but I like it, like it, yes, I do.”

 

“I can’t get no satisfaction

I can’t get no satisfaction

‘Cause I try and I try and I try and I try
I can’t get no, I can’t get no

“When I’m drivin’ in my car
And that man comes on the radio
He’s tellin’ me more and more
About some useless information
Supposed to fire my imagination
I can’t get no, oh no, no, no
Hey hey hey, that’s what I say

“I can’t get no satisfaction
I can’t get no satisfaction
‘Cause I try and I try and I try and I try
I can’t get no, I can’t get no
When I’m watchin’ my T.V.
And that man comes on to tell me
How white my shirts can be
But he can’t be a man ’cause he doesn’t smoke
The same cigarettes as me
I can’t get no, oh no, no, no
Hey hey hey, that’s what I say

“I can’t get no satisfaction
I can’t get no girl reaction
‘Cause I try and I try and I try and I try
I can’t get no, I can’t get no

“When I’m ridin’ round the world
And I’m doin’ this and I’m signing that
And I’m tryin’ to make some girl
Who tells me baby better come back later next week
‘Cause you see I’m on a losing streak
I can’t get no, oh no, no, no
Hey hey hey, that’s what I say

“I can’t get no, I can’t get no
I can’t get no satisfaction
No satisfaction, no satisfaction, no satisfaction”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/(I_Can’t_Get_No)_Satisfaction

http://www.rollingstones.com/

When is not enough, not enough? When is too much, too much? And is just right, just right?

Finally, when is it time to get off the stage?

As I contemplate the to-the-point immediate communication demands of our 2012 attention-driven society (particularly via social media), I keep on pondering the lessons of four legendary English rock n’ roll bands of the 1970s.

After standing in the rain for nearly eight hours outside some sterile Southern California department store in 1975 (amazed the call of nature didn’t intercede…ah to be young again), I finally reached the front of the line and bought two precious tickets to see Led Zeppelin.

page

In my mind’s eye, I could envision Jimmy Page laying on the first riffs of “Rock n’ Roll” with his Gibson Les Paul, Robert Plant hitting the high notes, workmanlike John Paul Jones on the bass/organ and John Henry Bonham pounding away on the drums.

A friend, who saw the show a few nights earlier, implored me to sell the tickets. I should have listened to him. Don’t get me wrong, I am a huge Led Zeppelin fan owning the band’s entire catalogue on both vinyl and CD. Listening to the band’s recordings is one thing; sitting through four hours of guitar, organ and drum solos comprising only 15 songs (do the math) was exhausting. When it was over, no one was demanding an encore.faces

During that same year, I saw the last tour of Rod Stewart and the Faces (Stewart, Ronnie Wood, Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagen and Kenney Jones). All-in-all, I have checked out four Rod Stewart shows, including the aforementioned Faces concert. Each one was over in approximately 90 minutes. And each time the audience wanted more but there was no more. The crowd felt jipped and there was a smattering of boos. We were not even close to being exhausted and we were far from satisfied.TheWho2

 

 

The Who was a different story. I saw the band for the first time at Anaheim Stadium in 1976 with the original lineup of Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle (The Ox) and Keith Moon. The second time was in Los Angeles with the Faces’ Kenney Jones replacing the deceased Moon on the drums. The band played for more than two hours and ended its regular set with “See Me, Feel Me, Touch Me, Heal Me” and “Won’t Get Fooled Again.” Alas, the encore was an anti-climatic throw-away.

Early this month, the Rolling Stones announced the availability of a bootleg recording of its July 13, 1975 concert at The Forum in Los Angeles. I was 20-years old at the time and vividly remember Aaron Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man,” dramatically introducing the band at that very same concert to thunderous applause. And then there was Mick Jagger and Keith Richards singing the chorus to “Honky Tonk Woman” with Charlie Watts on drums, Bill Wyman on bass and Woods just joining the Stones from the Faces.

Since the 1969 “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out” tour, the Stones have always been masters of choreography and pacing, starting their concerts at a kinetic pace (i.e., Honky Tonk, All Down the Line, You Can’t Rock Me) and then slowing down (e.g., You Can’t Always Get What You Want). The 1975 concert concluded with a series of Stones classic rockers including: Brown Sugar, Midnight Rambler, Street Fighting Man, Jumpin Jack Flash and the encore, Sympathy for the Devil.

Stonesya-yas

The show was 22 songs and ran about two hours or so with the audience coming away satisfied (Who says you can’t get no satisfaction?), but wanting more. The Stones knew when it was time to get off the stage. Led Zep played a four-hour concert; The Stones gave us a show. All together, I have seen the Stones six times live, and if they tour as rumored next year to celebrate their 50th anniversary as a band, my attendance will be a pilgrimage as it will for literally thousands and thousands of people.

The purpose of this epistle is not to simply recount how fortunate I have been to see some of the greatest rock n’ rollers of all time, but to deduce the lessons of these bands and project them to our 21st Century world of communication.

Recently, I was imploring a very bright colleague to drop her plans to market a 4.5-hour AUDIO ONLY tape. I borrowed the famous line from the late Texas Governor Ann Richards (no relation to Keith) stating: “That dog won’t hunt.”

A NFL game takes an average of 3.5 hours obviously accompanied by video and audio. The Led Zep show ran four hours with amplified sound, lasers and lighting. My entrepreneur acquaintance wants to market a 4.5-hour audio tape, broken into nine chapters, but still 4.5 hours. I urged a series of two-to-three minute YouTube videos as an alternative. No go…so I had to go.

My failure to convince someone (not the first) about the merits of quick messaging social media reminds me of The Diffusion of Innovations Theory by professor Everett Rogers. The theory is represented by a curve with innovators on the extreme left and laggards on the extreme right of the page (not implying any political connection). I am afraid that 4.5 hour audio tapes are heading in the laggard direction akin to the buggy whip. We live in a world of 140-character Tweets/20-second sound bites/quick Facebook posts.

We can either embrace this new world or coming into it kicking and screaming. We are not going back to Johannes Gutenberg and his 15th Century printing press or the modern-day equivalent in the form 4.5-hour audio tapes. The Stones and The Who proved four decades ago that less is more in rock ‘n roll. This same wisdom applies to 2012 communications choreography as well.

http://www.rollingstones.com/news/rolling-stones-release-la-friday-live-1975

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Copland

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faces_(band)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffusion_of_innovations

http://www.biography.com/people/ann-richards-9457298

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Gutenberg

“No one every went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public” – Henry Mencken http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._L._Mencken

Virtually every Baby Boomer can remember purchasing Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Band, circa 1967.

…and then Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Band on cassette (“A Day in the Life” sounded remarkably the same) until the tape inevitably broke.

…and then in the 1980s, Sgt. Pepper’s with a predictable marketing push was made available on CD (no more annoying scratches or broken tapes…or at least it was harder to scratch a CD).

beatlespepper

Fast forward to this week and we find out that the same boomers that bought Sgt. Pepper’s more than four decades ago on vinyl, again on cassette and still again on CD (which they may have already burned onto their iPod or MP3 player) can now download the same album or individual tracks from iTunes. http://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/the-beatles/id136975

For those of you scoring at home, you have followed a Long and Winding Road for more than 40 years and Apple, the technology company not the record label, is now giving you the opportunity to buy the exact same music in the fourth different format. That translates into one format per decade (Can we accelerate this trend…hmmm?).

Wonder if someone will figure out how you can buy the exact same music in the fifth different format? Don’t bet against it.

Don’t get me wrong; I too am a fan of the Fab Four. Having said that I am still shaking my head about all the breathless Facebook and Twitter posts from my friends, colleagues and comrades and the plethora of related media stories about “finally” having the ability to download individual Beatles songs…the exact same songs that have been around for more than 40 years…off Apple’s iTunes website. http://in.reuters.com/article/idINIndia-52951820101116

Why should we be surprised? Coca Cola and Pepsi taught us how to pay for what is nothing more and nothing less than free tap water (Dasani and Aquafina) just because it is packaged in easy-to-carry plastic bottles.

And who would have ever thought that we would be shelling out for three, four or five phones all at once? Someone is getting rich, but most likely it is not the “enlightened” consumer.

Besides the obvious redundancy, there is a certain sadness that comes from latent Beatlemania. The Beatles stopped touring in 1967, broke up three years later and of course, John Lennon and George Harrison, are no longer with us. So the band’s fans are left with just fading memories and the same recordings to be reproduced over and over again on whatever is the newest technology and then repackaged and remarketed (if there is such a word).

stonesconcert

An editor’s note is required here: I respect the Beatles. Having said that, I am a huge fan of the Rolling Stones www.rollingstones.com.  And yes I am guilty as well of buying Rolling Stones albums in multiple formats. The distinction is the band is still producing new material (e.g. “A Bigger Bang”) and the band reportedly will make plans in December for a worldwide tour with 67-year-old Mick Jagger strutting the stage; 66-year-old Keith Richards amplifying his signature riffs and yes, 69-year-old Charlie Watts playing the drums. The Stones will be rolling in their 50th year of existence.

“At a time when the French are griping about raising the retirement age to 62 these doughty senior citizens (Mick and Keith) are contemplating yet another world tour,” Schumpeter wrote in this week’s “The Economist.” www.economist.com S’il vous plait?

Do the Stones need the money? No. Are they assured their rightful place in musical history as one of (if not, the) greatest rock n’ roll band(s) of all time? Absolutely.

So why do they do it? Because they want to. And it will be a gift for all of us to share…You can’t always get what you want, but if you try some time, you just may find, you get what you need.

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