Tag Archive: CV


Once upon a time the best and the brightest were convinced without any conceivable doubt: The world is flat.

They were so sure they were right … err correct … until this guy … (should I mention his name?) … Christopher Columbus proved them to be wrong. At least that is what we were taught in school.

columbus

Score one for a new way of seeing our world.

Sometimes it is difficult to overcome well entrenched, stubborn, resolute and mule-like analog thinking.

This also applies to the prevailing wisdom about one-page resumes taught by some journalism and communication professors/instructors.

Contemplating parochial school lessons emanating from the Baltimore Catechism, one learned that the Ten Commandments were handed down from on high to Moses (e.g., played by Charlton Heston). One still remembers the sketches of Moses holding up the tablets and instructing the masses to avoid killing people, refrain from stealing someone else’s possessions, and never-ever committing adultery against one’s spouse and/or mistress.

hestonmoses

Alas, I never found anything chiseled in rock declaring that any-and-all curriculum vitaes (e.g., resumes) being restricted to one page, and only one page. And yet I keep on meeting cowering-and-quivering college students who have been bludgeoned into reducing fonts, running on sentences and cramming and jamming as much as they can into one eight-by-eleven inch piece of paper to comply with those who proclaim that all resumes must be in one-page Ordnung. Verstehen Sie? You better.

Let me engage a little heresy here at the risk of being excommunicated and never being allowed to fill my growler ever again.

Has anyone in the leadership of the majority of these journalism schools ever heard of binary code? Yep, these are those itsy, bitsy, teeny, weeny digital on-and-off instructions that are forever changing the world, including journalism as we know it, whether we like it or not.

Want to look up Moore’s Law? Maybe you shouldn’t.

Why does the irreversible global shift from analog-to-digital matter when it comes to resumes or CVs? The reason is that each-and-every resume for any high five-figure or any six-figure job or above, and with increasingly frequency entry-level positions as well, is submitted online. Does it really matter if the CV is one page, if the words are being transmitted and reviewed electronically…sometimes by a human and other times by a machine?

SEO Perfect Company

Is the length more important than content? Both the human and the search engine are calibrated to search out certain words that fit the job description (Hint: “Really working well with people” doesn’t cut it).

Instead when it comes to public relations, marketing, investor relations and communications, the search engine as in search engine optimization or SEO is looking for the following and more:

  • Message Development
  • Social Media
  • Employee Communications
  • Search Engine Optimization
  • Search Engine Marketing
  • Crisis Communications
  • Investor Relations
  • Media Relations
  • Analyst Relations
  • Media Training
  • Multimedia Skills
  • Presentation Skills

Does it matter if the search engine spots these terms and others on one page or more? Almost DailyBrett humbly contends that content reigns supreme, not length, particularly in our digital age.

Keep in mind that many employers are now asking for LinkedIn profile URLs instead of resumes at least when it comes to online applications. Are the J-School Pharisees asking for LinkedIn profiles to be restricted to one page? Is this possible considering that LinkedIn profiles are exclusively online?

Shhhh! … Let’s not give them any ideas.

A final thought comes to mind, and maybe the most important one of all: Are all graduating seniors created equal?

One of the most common arguments advanced by the Flat Earth, One-Page Resume Society is that college seniors don’t have enough experience and educational accomplishments to require more than one page. They have the semblance of an argument here.

resume1

The Almost DailyBrett response is that some seniors overachieve and outperform compared to their colleagues. They have oodles of internships, jobs, relevant activities and skill sets in addition to their education (e.g., B.A. or B.S. degree). For them, it is extremely difficult to tell their entire story to prospective employers on only one page.

Why should we arbitrarily penalize the overachievers?

Besides the cover letters and the CVs that they ultimately transmit (think binary ones and zeroes) to would-be employers are ultimately their OWN cover letters and their resumes. Graduating seniors are adults. They will make their own decisions. They will rise and fall based upon what they upload. Let them decide.

They should not be handcuffed by yesterday’s analog thinking.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myth_of_the_Flat_Earth

http://www.biography.com/people/christopher-columbus-9254209

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curriculum_vitae

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_code

http://www.catholicity.com/baltimore-catechism/

http://christianity.about.com/od/biblestorysummaries/p/tencommandstory.htm

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/history/museum-gordon-moore-law.html

http://searchengineland.com/guide/what-is-seo

An electronic job application for a privately held, big media marketing firm offers candidates a choice: Upload a soft copy of your resume or your LinkedIn profile.

Is this a choice or a trap?

linkedinleftbehind

The candidate has to choose one or the other (assuming she or he has both a CV and a LinkedIn profile). Certainly one can opt to upload a resume and copy-and-paste a cover letter, but what signal does that send? Did we ever have to consider potentially sending a potentially fatal technology laggard message by simply submitting a cover letter and resume?

If the candidate elects to offer her or his LinkedIn URL in lieu of a resume (and copy-and-paste an obligatory cover letter), is she or he telling this future employer that she or he gets it when it comes social media? Weighing the realistic potential of a trap, I would advise job candidates to submit their LinkedIn URL and carefully crafted and edited cover letters.

You may be thinking that I am being slightly (or even more) paranoid, but let’s face it: The job market is a minefield particularly in this long-time distressed economy.

Does this mean that resumes will soon become so 20th Century? We shouldn’t be so quick to throw dirt on resumes, but their usefulness is obviously being challenged by the agility and completeness of LinkedIn.

In some respects, resumes or curriculum vitae (CV) are the equivalent of name, rank and serial number. They chronicle your career, and if you are wise you will quantify your accomplishments to help the hiring manager make the critical interview or no-interview decision. A cover letter encourages the reading of the resume. The resume encourages or discourages an interview. Interviews are either path-ways to the employment promised land or a one-way ticket back to square one.

resume1

LinkedIn URLs accomplish the basic task of the resume (chronology of career, academic degrees, awards, memberships etc.), but they do more…so much more. First, submitting your LinkedIn URL implicitly demonstrates that you get it (or at least you are on your way to getting it) when it comes to social media. A potential employer can review the number and the quality of your LinkedIn “connections” to determine the company you keep, who knows you and vice versa.

The same point also applies to your LinkedIn groups that you have joined. I am a member of 24 groups, including a wide variety of public relations and communications professional groups, and those from my present and past employers. These groups are another way of demonstrating your “online presence” as emphasized by professional branding guru, Dan Schawbel. His recent Forbes article predicted that social media will replace resumes within 10 years. He may be conservative.

In addition, your LinkedIn profile not only lists who recommended you but allows hiring managers to immediately read your praises from former superiors, colleagues and most important of all, your subordinates. Examples of your PowerPoint or Prezi presentations can be uploaded to LinkedIn, giving employers’ insights into your presentation skills, design capabilities and thought processes. Try doing that with a resume.

A huge feature for me is the automatic posting and updating of my Almost DailyBrett blogs from WordPress to LinkedIn. An employer doesn’t have to surf WordPress to read Almost DailyBrett, particularly those posts that directly apply to the practice and teaching of communications choreography.

Some may be tempted to play down LinkedIn and its reported 150 million users in comparison to Facebook with its 901 million users or Twitter with its 500 million users. The difference is that LinkedIn is focused on attracting commerce and building professional networks. LinkedIn is a quality play, not a quantity play.

Wall Street seems to be noticing the difference in business models as LinkedIn (NYSE: LNKD) was initially priced at $45, immediately jumped to $85 on its IPO date and has been holding north of the three-figure mark, today finishing at $103.84. Despite all the springtime histrionics, Facebook (NASDAQ: FB) was offered at a $38 IPO price, rose slightly and immediately plunged. Today at close of market it stands at $28.09 per share.

Maybe one of points that is becoming clear to users, employers, potential employees, investors, analysts, media and others is that LinkedIn (and potential direct competitors/successors) is changing the way that candidates are identified and hired. At the same time, LinkedIn may be shoving the resume/CV into the back seat or may even be taking the wheel.

Is it time to sing LinkedIn über Alles? It could be; it very well could be.

Almost DailyBrett note: The writer of this blog post is a subscriber to LinkedIn, WordPress, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. More to the point, the blog writer owns a low double-digit quantity of LinkedIn shares and a low triple-digit quantity of Facebook shares. It is extremely doubtful that my endorsement of any publicly traded social media site will have any impact on Wall Street. If that were the case, I would ask my readers to subscribe to my “letter.”

http://www.bond-us.com/blog/linkedin-profile-or-resume-staffing-agency

http://www.linkedin.com/answers/career-education/resume-writing/CAR_RSW/924819-5780993

http://www.forbes.com/sites/danschawbel/2011/02/21/5-reasons-why-your-online-presence-will-replace-your-resume-in-10-years/

http://blog.cgsm.com/2012/02/08/when-will-a-linkedin-profile-replace-a-resume/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LinkedIn

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facebook

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twitter

%d bloggers like this: