Tag Archive: Keith Richards


“There was no keyboard player on the planet more appropriate to support Jim Morrison’s words.” — Doors’ drummer John Densmore on Ray Manzarek

Having trouble negotiating the Pere Lachaise cemetery maze in Paris?

No problem. Just join the steady stream of rock n’ roll pilgrims traipsing the footpaths to pay their respects to Jim Morrison.

As one of those recent pilgrims (last August), Almost DailyBrett will go out on a limb:

Never has a rock n’ roll front man cast such a long shadow over his fellow band mates than James Douglas Morrison, and that includes Mick Jagger.

Jagger and Keith Richards are forever joined at the hip as The Glimmer Twins of the Rolling Stones. The combo of Jagger-Richards wrote the songs that will stand the test of time. The public not only expects, but demands that Mick and Keith stay together.

The magnetism, stage presence and voice of the so-called “Lizard King,” Jim Morrison, easily eclipsed the combined impact of guitarist, Robby Krieger, drummer, John Densmore and Doors co-founder (with Morrison) keyboards-bassist, Ray Manzarek.

Morrison died, way too young in Paris at 27 in 1971. The French never performed an autopsy, but what we always suspected … was most likely the culprit. One other member of the Doors, keyboard and bass player, Ray Manzarek, also passed away, just six years ago courageously fighting rare cholangiocarcinoma —  bile duct cancer — in Rosenheim, Germany.

Morrison was the legend of The Doors.

His presence and his lasting power are uncontested. Each-and-every day, people from around the world come to Pere Lachaise to take a glimpse at his relatively mundane tombstone, shoved into a tight space against the backdrop of larger memorials for unknown people. Doesn’t the memory of Morrison deserve better? Maybe not the Lenin Mausoleum … but better?

Manzarek was the sound of The Doors.

His keyboards ignited “Light My Fire,” amped up “Back Door Man,” propelled “Back Door Man” and powered “LA Woman.”  Manzarek’s keyboard solo on “Riders On The Storm”was arguably his best work. He happily described the writing and recording the haunting, yet beautiful song, in a recent YouTube video (see below).

The Doors Philosopher

“If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is: infinite.” — Poet William Blake’s quote that reportedly inspired philosopher Aldous Huxley’s book “The Doors of Perception,” and thus the name of the band.

“You don’t make music for immortality; you make music for the moment, capturing the sheer joy of being alive on Planet Earth.” — Ray Manzarek

If you were seeking out a perfect commentator to interpret the Doors’ phenomenon (100 million records sold globally from eight albums during eight years, 1965-1973), you couldn’t do better than Manzarek. Time-and-time again he nailed it, when it came to describing the Weltanschauung of the band.

Manzarek was outspoken without coming across as outspoken. His quote above brings a smile to your author, who has neither time nor patience for Oliver Stone’s 1960s fantasies and fairy tales.

Some immediately dismiss all psychedelic era rock n’ rollers as little more than drugged-out skeletons. Manzarek with his glasses and era sideburns contributed to this image. Yet there was more, much more with Manzarek.

Almost DailyBrett is not suggesting the Doors were angels (e.g., Morrison’s well-chronicled drinking habit), but the complexity of Manzarek should be admired and appreciated. Besides his undergraduate degree in economics from DePaul, Manzarek earned a M.F.A from UCLA. He married Dorothy Aiko Fujikama in 1967, the couple raised one son Pablo, and had three grandchildren.

The couple left Los Angeles behind, buying and renovating a wine country farm house in Vichy Springs (e.g., Napa Valley) in 2004. Manzarek’s incredible talent spanned music, writing and maybe a little architectural design as well.

Manzarek will never be a household name, let alone a legend. There are almost zero pilgrimages to pay final respects (reportedly, Manzarek was creamated). No one should doubt his contribution to the band he co-founded, his incredible talent and his thoughtfulness.

Manzarek was indeed … the sound of the Doors.

Home

https://www.sfgate.com/homeandgarden/article/Rock-n-roll-retreat-The-Doors-Ray-Manzarek-2798037.php

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Manzarek

Time is money.” — Founding Father Benjamin Franklin

“Time is money. Wasted time means wasted money means trouble.” — Shirley Temple

Very few things in life irritate Almost DailyBrett more than walking into a supermarket with 12 or more check-out lines, and only two are open.

Albertsons is a particularly notorious offender. The supermarket chain is essentially asking consumers to subsidize its cheapness by forcing customers to waste time in long lines.

Your author does not shop at Albertsons or any any other serial personal-time thief.

Some upscale supermarkets (e.g., Market of Choice) have checkers available at every checkout, but the prices are much higher.

Which brings us to the question du jour: What is more important: Your money or your time?

The cop-out initial answer: It all depends.

If one barely has two shekels to rub together, the answer is obvious … you stand in long lines, hopefully getting a better deal for your precious time.

If one has no financial worries with a steady salaried position, packed schedule or even is a billionaire entrepreneur, then time is obviously the choice.

What would happen if you have $100,000 in assets and $100,000 in liabilities (besides losing sleep)?

You are essentially running a precarious personal/family business. Naturally, one would want to grow the assets and decrease the liabilities. Does that mean opting for money over time is the priority? Or does that mean putting time effectively to work over money is the answer?

Everybody loves a deal. Right?

Think of it this way, no one goes on Amazon or eBay looking to pay full freight. Heck no, we want a bargain. We want the best bang for our cherished buck

Does that mean we wait in way-too-long lines to just secure a better deal? How about the pool souls who waited up-to-10 hours outside an Apple store, just to pay more than $1,000 for the Apple iPhone X?

Sometimes the questions comes down to return on investment (ROI). Is the “deal” worth the time? Is the time worth the “deal?” Is the time worth, paying full retail?

Infinite vs. Finite

“Time is more value than money. You can get more money, but you cannot get more time.” — Jim Rohn, author and entrepreneur

Well-run enterprises are constantly figuring out novel ways of saving customer time, reducing internal costs and delivering competitively priced merchandise.

ATMs have been a fixture for banks, conceivably since the Earth cooled.

Some supermarkets have self-checkout lines, allowing consumers with a minimum or no assistance to scan products, bag and pay, thus minimizing time.

Did you check out McDonald’s reaching an all-time high stock price of $221.93 last Friday? The fast-food leader accomplished this feat even as global markets were rattled with US/China trade uncertainty, Hong Kong tensions, and confusing public relations message by the Federal Reserve?

Investors detest FUD … Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt.

McDonald’s daily feeding of 68 million or 1 percent of the earth’s population (e.g., 75 burgers per second) has long been accepted by Wall Street.

What is new is McDonald’s commitment to customer IT, particularly self-ordering kiosks providing greater speed with the same expected Big Mac quality. Sorry Veggies, Almost DailyBrett is an admitted McDonald’s investor and consumer (NYSE:MCD) and has to call em as I see em.

When push comes to shove, what is more vital money or time?

Time cannot buy groceries or love. The legal tender whether it be greenbacks, Euros, Pounds Sterling, Yen, Yuan etc. is a necessity of life. One must possess currency.

If one manages his or her personal and economic affairs correctly, there should always be the ability to make more money during the course of a lifetime. The key as you author is fond of pontificating and bloviating is … Buy Low Sell High. Discretionary revenues should be intelligently put to work.

Money can purchase groceries and many times love, but can it buy time?

That’s the rub. Money conceivably can always grow (Keith Richards makes money when he sleeps … royalties).

Time is finite. There is no arguing the point; one has only so much time. That’s why Almost DailyBrett always hopes that “Time Is On My Side.”

https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Franklin/01-03-02-0130

https://www.businessinsider.com/19-facts-about-mcdonalds-that-will-blow-your-mind-2012-4#mcdonalds-sells-more-than-75-hamburgers-every-second-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“We all know what’s wrong with each other, and what is right with each other.” – Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts on his three four-decade-plus colleagues

“Love is patient, love is kind … It keeps no record of wrongs … It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” — 1 Corinthians 13:4-8

Almost DailyBrett is not suggesting the Rolling Stones – Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood — love each other.

The 1980s feud between Mick and Keith almost tore the band apart.

Mild-mannered Charlie once decked Mick after the latter signed a solo recording contract, and started touring without his fellow Rolling Stones.

Regardless, your author notes the four members of the widely proclaimed and regarded “Greatest Rock ‘n Roll Band in the World” have been together for 42 years, and three-of-the-original five (i.e., Jagger, Richards and Watts) have prevailed for an amazing 55 years as a still-relevant force in music, culture and at times, international relations.

Are the Rolling Stones a net plus or a net minus for humanity? This hopelessly biased blog takes the “over.”

As Keith Richards is fond of saying, his job is to touch as many people as he can.

Mission accomplished. The Stones have touched and made happy literally millions around the world from London to Perth and from Shanghai (e.g., March 2014) to Havana (March 2016). The latter two reflected a marked relaxation of political/societal norms in Marxist China and Cuba, and provided a glimmer of hope for greater freedoms in these countries.

Of course, not everything in the career of the Rolling Stones has been rosy. Almost DailyBrett commented on the organizational and humanitarian disaster at Altamont in 1969 when someone – anyone – needed to say ‘no’ to a free, totally disorganized free concert for 400,000 people with the Hell’s Angels serving as the Praetorian Guards.

There is the good. There is the bad. The band members do not love each other. How do they stay together?

“Closest of Brothers”?

“Mick’s album was called ‘She’s the Boss,’ which said it all. I’ve never listened to the entire thing al the way through. Who has? It’s like ‘Mein Kampf. Everybody had a copy, but nobody listened to it.” – Guitarist Keith Richards in his memoirs, “Life”

“Mick and I may not be friends – too much wear and tear for that – but we’re the closest of brothers, and that can’t be severed … Nobody else can say anything against Mick that I can hear. I’ll slit their throat.” – Keith Richards on Mick Jagger

Almost DailyBrett must interject for a nanosecond and ask: How many relationships of highly accomplished, high ego lads (or ladies) can stay together for five-plus decades?

As Charlie said there are definitely things wrong with each member of the Rolling Stones, but more importantly there are more things that are right. Human nature unfortunately gravitates toward the negative, but it is the positive that keeps people together and on track.

In organizations, sometimes the best candidate is the internal candidate. But isn’t that same person undermined by the fact that he or she did something wrong during the course of performing the job?

Some critic must point out this transgression or that failing. The internal candidate may be the best person for the job. And yet someone remembers the fault, and the organization subsequently hires someone outside and maybe prompting the internal candidate to leave.

Who are the most apt violators of “Love is Patient, Love is Kind”? You guessed it: Families.

For some reason, diplomacy goes right out the window as family members contend they are obligated to point out another family member’s transgression without any attempt to utilize tact and diplomacy.

As Almost DailyBrett has repeatedly asked: “If they were not your relatives, would they be your friends?”

The Rolling Stones are not related to each other, but as Keith has suggested they are the closest of brothers. Charlie has added that they are so close that they know each other’s faults, but more importantly their positives.

How much longer the Stones will tour, record, exhibit and break down barriers? Only Father Time will tell. Charlie is 75. Mick and Keith are 73. Ronnie is the “youngster” at 69.

Almost DailyBrett can only surmise that as long as their collective health is decent; they still have the fire in their bellies, and they do not keep a record of wrongs: Time Very Well Will Be On Their Side.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+Corinthians+13:4-8

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/event/article-2345279/Mick-Jagger-Keith-Richards-feud-nearly-broke-Rolling-Stones.html

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2012/11/25/the-permanency-of-altamont/

“You can’t always get what you want; but if you try sometimes; well you just might find; you get what you need.” – Jagger, Richards

Great tune, but does it work as an uplifting campaign-theme song?

The author of Almost DailyBrett used to snicker at the thought of a blushing bride choosing this song for the first dance with her new groom: You can’t always get what you want (in grooms) … (but hopefully) you get what you need.trumpstones

For the same reason, one must wonder why the Donald Trump campaign chose “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” as one of the musical closers of the quadrennial Republican National Convention last July in Cleveland?

The first song following The Donald’s dystopian acceptance speech was “All Right Now” by The Free, which makes sense. That is not the case with the next song, the Rolling Stones classic, “You Can’t Get What You Want.”

After dispatching 17 other Republican presidential aspirants in the primaries and caucuses was Donald Trump all the GOP needed?

The same applies to using the very same Rolling Stones song immediately following President-elect Donald Trump’s victory tour speech last week in Cincinnati.

Mick and Keith are not happy and have shared their displeasure with the Trump campaign and the media, only to be told that the Stones must accept not getting any satisfaction on this one.micktrump

The music has been purchased and is being played in a public place, so the Trump campaign does not owe the Stones one shekel for their song and is offering zero apologies.

Okay now that we have that dispute (un)settled, let’s access from a public relations standpoint how songs can or cannot serve as metaphors for advocacy.

Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow

Some campaigns have trouble coming up with consistent themes. If identifying an appropriate mantra is a problem (and that was the case for Hillary Clinton), then finding a related song which resonates with the public and the times is doubly tough.

One of the most successful efforts was the use of “Happy Days Are Here Again” by FDR at the Democratic convention during the height of the Depression in 1932.

Sixty years later, Arkansas Governor (and Hillary’s hubby) played Fleetwood Mac’s futuristic “Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow” to offer a dramatic contrast to President George H.W. Bush’s tired administration.billclintonsax

Eight years later, the campaign of Texas Governor George W. Bush employed Tom Petty’s “I Won’t Back Down” and The Who’s anthem “Won’t Get Fooled Again” in direct defiance to the Clinton-Gore machine.

The appropriateness of songs is not the most serious subject ever pondered by Almost DailyBrett, they still must be consistent with the overall thrust of a presidential campaign.

Even though this author scratches his follicly challenged scalp when contemplating Trump using a song that expresses the frustration of blowing an amplifier fuse, the real issue is whether Republicans are saying to the nation that you can’t get what you want, but Trump is what you need?

For some reason, the song is working at least among those in the hinterlands who have been searching for a champion and not finding her or him in Washington, D.C.

Can any of these “poorly educated” folks as Trump lovingly described them, name any of the four members of the Rolling Stones, much less identify with the lyrics of “You Can’t Always Get What You Want”?

Does it matter?

http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1840981_1840998_1840923,00.html

http://www.tmz.com/2016/07/22/donald-trump-you-cant-always-get-what-you-want/

http://www.thedailybeast.com/cheats/2016/10/12/mick-jagger-on-trump-using-stones-songs-i-can-t-stop-him.html?via=desktop&source=copyurl

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/victorious-donald-trump-mocks-rolling-9224213

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHU3oAhM4tU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siMFORx8uO8

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Right_Now

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TytGVo1O3_w

 

 

 

 

Narcissism (Noun): Extreme selfishness, with a grandiose view of one’s own talents and a craving for admiration, as characterizing a personality type.

There is a profound difference between “confidence” and “cockiness.”narcissus

Almost DailyBrett mentors present-and-future professionals to strive for the former and to not cross the clearly demarcated line to the latter.

We shouldn’t take ourselves too seriously, but at the same time we want and for the most part we deserve to be respected.

After all, doesn’t every airline implore us to put on our own oxygen mask first before helping others?

But what happens when a narcissist doesn’t give a particle about others? Screw their oxygen mask. Right?

What if everything and anything is about you, and only you?

Instead of being selfless, you are always selfish … and don’t even think twice about it, let alone recognize its existence.narcissist1

Forget about passing the ball to someone who has an easier shot. The narcissist wants to make that “One Shining Moment” basket.

And if he or she misses the shot, it is someone else’s fault.

You (the narcissist) can do no wrong. If something is amiss, how did others err? How will they make it up to you? What can they do for you? You are eternally entitled.

Doesn’t everyone else understand this basic fact of life?

Let others preach first-person plural (i.e., we, us, our). Your world is always first-person singular (e.g., I, me, myself) or worse yet, third-person singular (for example, referring to yourself as “The president” ala Richard Nixon).

Are these narcissistic individuals setting themselves up for a huge fall? They will blame others for their unfortunate sequence of events. It’s not their fault that they are lying on the canvas with their pretty tassels flying through the air.

Can these people – way too many First World souls in this writer’s estimation – find the help they need? Can they be helped?

It seems that far-too-many are OHHHDEEE-ing on Narcissism.

“Not Being Quoted at All”

Far worse than being misquoted is not being quoted at all.” – Former White House Communications Counselor and Presidential Candidate Patrick Buchanan

The author of Almost DailyBrett has openly admitted that he is not an expert on psychology; in fact he has never even taken one miserly course in the subject.

Having made this public admission, there seems IMHO to be even more signs of this malady besides the obvious references to Donald Trump. Yes, there is no doubt The Donald doesn’t care what you think about him, just as long as you are talking and thinking about him.

Mr. CombOver is certainly neither the first and nor will he be the last chief executive officer and/or politician (in his case a combination of the two) to have more than a healthy regard for himself or herself (e.g., Carly Fiorina).

Not everyone who becomes a household name is necessarily a narcissist, even though to a person all über-successful hombres and mujeres have a strong-positive opinion of themselves. Still each non-narcissist will put on their oxygen mast first, and then turn to assist others.

The Worst Generation of Narcissists and Their Offspring

“Tom Brokaw once wrote a book about the greatest generation, those brave people who survived the depression and fought in World War II. Unfortunately that great generation spawned a generation of narcissists: the baby boomers.” – Huffington Post blogger Gene Marks

He’s very moral. He’s very caring, unlike his image.” – Ronnie Wood discussing Rolling Stones band mate Keith Richards

The Baby Boomers (aka Worst Generation) have often been labeled as the “Me” generation. We are characterized by our overt preoccupation with our personal comfort. If it feels good, then just do it.narcissist

Is it any surprise that we passed along these traits to our offspring, the Millennials?

To be fair, the Millennials (born 1982-2004) seem to be far more interested than Baby Boomers in giving back to society, opting for experiences as opposed to material possessions. How many Millennials will need concrete blocks with garish orange doors at a monthly fee just to store our excess?

How about very few?

And yet, our negative influence is exhibited in Millennials far too much. Some refuse to accept their own responsibility for misfortune. Some will demand the prize because they “deserve it.” Some will say they are being “punished” when maybe … just maybe … they should just look into the mirror instead.

And where did they learn these traits?

There is a preceding generation that collectively needs to be looking into the mirror as well.

http://www.bustle.com/articles/150950-donald-trumps-latest-ego-trip-should-make-every-democrat-very-happy

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2015/07/06/the-worst-generation/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/vegan-gluten-free-elitism-with-coconut-oil-2/

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2014/03/here-is-when-each-generation-begins-and-ends-according-to-facts/359589/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2015/08/26/selfie-sticks/

 

 

 

“I wrote ‘Satisfaction’ in my sleep. I had no idea I’d written it, it’s only thank God for the little Philips cassette player … I pushed rewind and there was ‘Satisfaction.’” – Keith Richards, Life

“’Satisfaction’ changed us from just another band into a huge, monster band.” – Mick Jagger, Old Gods Almost Deadsatisfaction1

This coming Saturday night, the Rolling Stones will play Jerry World, the $1 billion mega-excess stadium built for the Dallas Cowboys by their obnoxious owner in Arlington, Texas.

More importantly, the concert coincides with the exact 50th anniversary June 6 date of the American release of “I Can’t Got No Satisfaction,” arguably the greatest rock n’ roll song of all time. Satisfaction became overnight the No. 1 hit in both the United States and United Kingdom and held that position for months.

Some will contend that “Gimme Shelter” was the best-ever Stones’ song. Some may back “Paint It Black,” “Jumpin Jack Flash,” “Sympathy for the Devil,” “Brown Sugar” or “Start Me Up.” There are good arguments for all of them, but “Satisfaction” with its unmistakable opening fuzz riff still triggers the same physical result each and every time. The most famous double negative of all time is the hit that put the Stones on the map for good, 50 years ago.

And if it wasn’t for a cheap cassette recorder, the Gulf Motel in Clearwater, Florida and a Gibson fuzz box purchased from Wallach’s Music City in LaLaLand, we may have not attained Satisfaction and would be poorer as a society.fuzzbox

Summer of ‘65

We’re listening to ourselves in Minnesota somewhere on the radio, ‘Hit of the Week,’ and we didn’t even know (Stones manager) Andrew (Oldham) had put the fucking thing out.

“At first I was mortified. As far as I was concerned that was just the dub. Ten days on the road and it’s number one nationally! The record of the summer of ’65. So I’m not arguing. And I learned that lesson – sometimes you can overwork things. Not everything’s designed for your taste and your taste alone.” – Keith Richards, Life

What’s the old saying? If something is not broken, don’t try to fix it.

As the author of Almost DailyBrett has more than one occasion mentioned, he first heard the famous riffs, the incredible beat, the pulsating sound and the rebellious cry of sexual frustration for the first time as a 10-year-old on a Boy Scout campout somewhere in Southern California. The still prim-and-proper Beatles were not Willkommen in my suburban home; you can only imagine the reaction by the Benny Goodman/Frank Sinatra/George Gershwin crowd to the Rolling Stones.

The year 1965 was another transition year from the Greatest Generation that overcame the Global Depression and sent Hitler, Mussolini and Tojo packing before providing the biological seeds and eggs for the Worst Generation, the Baby Boomers.

Otto Preminger’s black-and-white In Harm’s Way with John Wayne may have represented a last gasp of the WWII generation. Two years later came a color film, The Graduate, featuring Dustin Hoffman’s famous line: “Are you trying to seduce me, Mrs. Robinson?” The movie was shocking back then, but it was only a prelude for The Summer of Love, the fights in the streets of Chicago, Woodstock and Altamont.

The Ultimate Encore

“Jagger and his bandmates staged a high-energy show, with the lead singer a jaw-dropping sight as he strutted, danced, swayed and ran — at one point, late in the show, sprinting the length of what must have been a 60-yard stage. His stamina would dazzle at any age.” – USA Today review of the San Diego opening of the Rolling Stones’ Zip Code Tourmickkeith2

Even though it took four Rolling Stones concerts for yours truly to accomplish personal Satisfaction, that is hearing the song played live and singing the infamous words with tears streaming down my face, there is little doubt that each and every member of the Zip Code tour audience will hear/sing the song.

From a choreography standpoint, the Stones begin their encore with a local choir joining them on stage for another 1960s-era classic, “You Can’t Always Get What You Want.” Once completed, Keith will lay his mangled hands on his Fender  Telecaster and pound out those famous Satisfaction riffs.

Your author is over-the-top biased, but there is no song that defines the word crescendo better than Satisfaction. The Stones stretch this one out for the cheering crowd just to make sure that no one leaves unhappy and unsatisfied.

Think of it this way: Satisfaction was an anthem of the times that has stood the test of time.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/music/2015/05/25/rolling-stones-open-north-american-stadium-tour-in-san-diego/27907521/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2012/07/12/lifelong-search-for-satisfaction/

http://www.rockandrollroadmap.com/places/record-stores/los-angeles-area/wallachs-music-city

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwS4-Vn4z_8

http://www.tampabay.com/things-to-do/music/50-years-ago-the-rolling-stones-song-satisfaction-was-born-in-clearwater/2227921

http://www.floridahistorynetwork.com/may-6-1965—rolling-stones-play-clearwater-write-satisfaction-riff.html

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9F02E1DC163EE03ABC4F53DFB266838E679EDE

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/crescendo

 

 

 

 

 

…It’s Great to Be Anywhere.” – Rolling Stones songwriter/guitarist Keith Richards

keith

If there was an over/under wager 10 years ago on the prospects of Keith ever celebrating his 70th birthday (December 18, 2013), the vast majority of us would have taken the under … and lost.

As it turns out Keef, Mick, 70, Charlie, 72, and (the youngster) Ronnie, 66, are hitting the road again, starting with the UAE on February 21 and then on to Japan and Australia, before finishing up in New Zealand on April 5.

And don’t bet against them continuing their global tour. In fact, you should plan on it.

What gives the Stones the energy, the stamina, the drive to continue on-and-on when their bank accounts are conceivably full and their legacy and place in rock-and-roll history is unquestioned?

Maybe it is this simple: There is a joy in what they do. And why not just keep on, keeping on?

The decision will be based on, can I do it joyfully, because I think we need to have candidates lift our spirits. – Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush on whether he will run for president in the 2015-16 electoral cycle.

jeb

Jeb will turn 61 years-young next week. He is the first Republican to ever win the Sunshine State’s governorship for two consecutive terms. Based on the experiences of his dad (#41) and older brother (#43), he knows exactly what lies in store for him if he declares for the presidency.

And yet he describes his decision in terms of whether he can do it “joyfully.” Is he serious? Is this good politics? Or is it both?

In these days of divisive politics and broken government, the Reaganesque notion of bringing joy, hope and optimism will be hard to pull off in the face of massive skepticism, if not cynicism, emanating from The Fourth Estate.

And yet another in his seventh decade of life, he may be pursuing the brass ring.

Who wouldn’t want to be Pete Carroll right now?

carroll1

The 62 year-old coach supposedly couldn’t win in the NFL. He proved the critics ultimately wrong in front of a U.S. television broadcast all-time record audience of 111 million. Nobody predicted a 43-8 blowout by the Seattle Seahawks against Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos. And yet it happened.

The rap against the irrepressible, forever youthful Carroll was that he just couldn’t cut it during earlier stints with the New York Jets and New England Patriots, and anyone can win at USC with its easy access to the best recruits in Southern California. If that was true, why did Lane Kiffin, Paul Hackett, Larry Smith and Ted Tollner all essentially fail at Troy? Carroll won the Pac-10 conference a record seven consecutive times.

And now his first Super Bowl win.

Will there be more? I will take the over on that particular wager.

Delivering a recent TED Talk, entrepreneur and motivator Jonathan Fields addressed the subject of Turning Fear Into Fuel for Brilliance.

fields

He discussed how he signed a six-year New York City lease for a yoga studio on September 10, 2001…the day before September 11. The Gods seemed to be ganging up on him…and yet he overcame adversity and sleepless nights, stared down fear and won.

He asked the audience: “What if I do nothing?” He rhetorically responded, stating there are no sideways in life. Change is inevitable. We can make it our friend or not.

He ended his talk by asking another question: “What if I succeed?” Should we be afraid of what we want? Or is success just another opportunity to get better and to explore more in our lives?

You can bet the Stones are not content with their past tours and recordings. Jeb Bush may not be satisfied with just his past record as Florida’s governor. You can be certain that Pete Carroll is thinking about his next Super Bowl win and potentially building a dynasty in the Emerald City. And inevitably, Jonathan Fields will have another motivational lecture to deliver and another audience to inspire.

All of my musings here are intended to be a kick in the posterior for those in their 50s and 60s, who elect to do nothing and let society put them out to pasture.

We can be change adverse and hope that we can merely go sideways, but as Jonathan Fields correctly surmises that is really not an option.

Or we can dare to succeed and stare the prospect of failure right in the face, and make the best of each and every day that remains in our lives. Let’s not merely run out the clock.

For the author of Almost DailyBrett, he is on the precipice of a huge decision, one that could take him north or south. Whatever he decides one door will close and another will open. And once the decision is made? He will resist the temptation to look at his rear-view mirror.

It will be great to be here; it will be great to be anywhere.

http://mayareynoldswriter.blogspot.com/2007/07/passing-vodka-bottle-and-playing-guitar.html

http://www.rollingstones.com/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkFRwhJEOos

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2014/01/31/why-jeb-bush-is-the-single-biggest-question-mark-in-the-2016-sweepstakes/?wpisrc=nl_politics

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeb_Bush

https://www.ted.com/talks

Even though I am not in a position to write a musically educated concert review of blues legend Riley B. King, known to the world as B.B. King, my expenditure of $138 for two tickets permits me to sadly conclude this should be the last global tour of the “King of the Blues.”

Last night at the Hult Center in Eugene, Oregon should have been a night of celebration of a musical giant. Instead the audience quietly walked away when it became evident that after a little more than an hour the cumulative impact of 87-years young and his 20-year fight with Type II diabetes had prompted B.B. to call it quits for the evening.

bbking

Promptly at 7:30 pm PDT, the eight-piece B.B. King band started its performance of down-home Southern blues. Everyone knew the time was coming closer for the arrival of B.B. He walked out onto to the stage to a standing ovation. “Lucille,” his Gibson ES-355, was carefully placed beside his chair.

One problem: Lucille’s amplifier was kaputt. Kein Problem. B.B. sat down, smiled and introduced the members of his band, including his drummer twice. A second amplifier was brought on stage…and it didn’t work either. Did anyone bother with a sound check?

B.B. seemed to take it in stride as Amp #3 was carried on stage with his band guitarist taking the lead. Finally…after 15 minutes…we heard the first distinctive B.B. King chords. Except B.B. really wasn’t pleased with Amp#3, prompting the arrival of Amp#4.

The high-points of the night came in succession with B.B. leading the audience in singing You Are My Sunshine (encouraging the kissing of your loved one) and then his signature The Thrill is Gone…a truncated version. Soon after, B.B. King announced he was over his allotted time.

Being able to say and remember seeing “The King of the Blues” made the night worth the high price of admission. Still it was not the same as the memories of Keith Richards, Jimmy Page, Pete Townshend, Billy Gibbons and The Edge, all in their prime, playing before packed houses.

Age inevitably wins. No matter how hard we try (and we should), age will prevail. Watching Muhammad Ali in his last fight against Larry Holmes (it wasn’t pretty) or the Terry Bradshaw-era Pittsburgh Steelers grow old and lose a step or two all at the same time, sends a sad but certain signal that it is time to move on to the next era of life…whatever that may be.

Reportedly, B.B. King works up to 225 nights per year. He is a “doer” and a “maker” and needs to be saluted and praised. For his fans (and count me in that grouping) his YouTube videos and digital recordings are better than hearing him live. There was exhilaration from hearing the chords coming from “Lucille” for just a few minutes and then the thrill was gone.

There comes a time…I’m sorry to say, for the legend B.B. King that time has come.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B.B._King

http://www.bbking.com/

http://www.biography.com/people/bb-king-9364839

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/in-celebration-of-national-diabetes-month-bb-king-tells-it-like-it-is-55482772.html

http://www.hultcenter.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_Are_My_Sunshine

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thrill_Is_Gone

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucille_%28guitar%29

“Sure, we’ll do a free concert, why not?” – Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards.

“I mean, like people, who’s fighting and what for? Why are we fighting? Why are we fighting? Every other scene has been cool…” – Rolling Stones lead singer Mick Jagger at Altamont.

altamont

As the Rolling Stones take the stage this evening in London’s O2 Arena to mark the 50th year as the greatest rock n’ roll in the world (if not the greatest of all time), there is no way in all this celebration to erase easily the darkest day in the band’s history.

Watching the two-hour HBO special last week, Crossfire Hurricane, and YouTube video clips, one is simply stunned by the brutal savagery of the 1969 free concert staged in a demolition derby track in a God-awful part of California’s East Bay at a horrible time of the year.

Every time I have driven along I-580 between Livermore in eastern Alameda County and Tracy in California’s Central Valley, I think about 300,000 people traipsing along the rolling hills of the Altamont Pass. I also think about how incredibly cold it becomes once the sun goes down in late fall.

Why Altamont?

And why in early December?

Obviously, one can Monday morning quarterback an event that occurred 44 years ago and say how you would do it differently (if at all). Still Altamont is a reminder of the compelling need at times to use the most important two-letter word in the English language: “no.”

Reflecting back to December 6, 1969: Nixon was in the White House. The napalm was defoliating jungles in Vietnam for no certain purpose. Woodstock was a recent “triumph.” The Rolling Stones were completing an incredibly successful U.S. tour (e.g., “Get Yer Ya Ya’s Out”).

Stonesya-yas

Why not give back to the fans with a free gig to compensate for charging a then outlandishly expensive $7.50 a ticket for all of the other Rolling Stones shows?

The more important questions that should have been asked were: where, when, why, what, who and how? Another question: Is no free concert better than a free concert that has the potential to turn disastrous and deadly? That particular question needed to be asked by organizers, law enforcement and in particular, the tour management and even the five-members of the Rolling Stones.

And why in hell were the Hells Angels hired for a truckload of beer to serve as the police force for 300,000? Who was in charge anyway? The simple answer: No one.

Reportedly, the free concert was going to be held on a practice field for San Jose State’s football team, but the City of San Jose was not keen on this idea. Then it was going to be staged at Golden Gate Park, but the proposed event coincided with a San Francisco 49ers home game at Kezar Stadium in Golden Gate Park (e.g., Stones and NFL football fans in the same weekend). No Tumbling Dice.

The next possible venue reportedly was Sears Point Raceway, but the owner wanted $300,000, plus the movie rights to the event that was going to include Carlos Santana, Flying Burrito Brothers, CS&N, Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and the Stones.

Two days before the show, the Altamont Raceway was suggested. All that needed to be done was to build the stage (as it turns out: only four-feet off the ground in the bottom of a gully) and manage traffic, logistics, security, sanitation, first aid and provisions for 300,000 intimate friends.

No sweat.

What’s ironic was that Jerry Garcia and the Grateful Dead proposed the Hells Angels as the security force. When they heard that the violence-prone motorcycle gang had parked their Harleys in front of the stage as a “deliberate provocation” (the words of Keith Richards) and policed the crowd with sawed-off pool cues, they decided to skip the gig and went into hiding.

Four people were killed at Altamont; four were born and hundreds were stabbed and/or beaten up. The only recourse left to the Stones was to threaten to not play until the violence and ugliness stopped. Was that really an option? As they noted in Crossfire Hurricane, they were surrounded, frightened and had absolutely no control over neither the crowd nor their Praetorian Guards, The Hells Angels.

Stones Jagger And  Richards  Eye  Hells Angels At Altamont

According to Stephen Davis’ book, Old Gods Almost Dead, the national media ignored Altamont. “Time and Life, still rhapsodizing about Woodstock, didn’t mention it. The New York Times ran a small story in a late Sunday edition. Newsweek ran a piece three weeks later…”

Certainly, the Stones have not been immune to controversy and screaming headlines during the band’s history (e.g., the drug busts). They have survived it all and stayed together (at least three of the original five) and relevant for five decades and counting. Their brand and legacy is still tarnished by Altamont. Having acknowledged their unprecedented accomplishments one can conclude: Altamont was a chapter in their story that didn’t need to be written.

Somebody, anybody needed to simply say, “No.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dt0ipUCfdlU

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sns-rt-music-rollingstones-pix-tv-update-1l4n0950bn-20121125,0,633285.story

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altamont_Raceway_Park

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altamont_Free_Concert

http://www.squidoo.com/altamont-speedway-free-festival-1969

http://www.hells-angels.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Praetorian_Guard

KHJ radio in Los Angeles was cranked to the max for our Boy Scout campout in 1965.

I thought, What’s with this fuzz guitar, the incredible beat, and this singer with all the moves?

stonesearly

Fast forward 47 years and I am still not tired of probably the most famous double-negative in music history, “I Can’t Get No Satisfaction.”

That particular Boy Scout campout also began my lifelong quest to hear the song live with Keith Richards laying down the riffs, Charlie Watts keeping time on the drums and Mick Jagger belting out the vocals. I went twice to the “Fabulous” Forum in Los Angeles (Inglewood to be precise) in 1975 (Tour of the Americas) in search of “Satisfaction.” Aaron Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man” served as the intro for the Stones and about 20 songs, sandwiched by “Honky Tonk Women” and “Sympathy for the Devil.” Jagger swung (literally) off the ceiling of the Forum, and yet there was no “Satisfaction.”

The next try for “Satisfaction” came almost a generation later in 1999 (No Security Tour) at the San Jose Arena. Ronnie Wood was the lead guitarist and bass player Bill Wyman had quit the band. These Stones had gathered some moss, but they still could deliver about 22 songs including Bob Dylan’s “Just Like a Rolling Stone,” but still I couldn’t get no “Satisfaction.” I was now a big “O” for three.

Long ago, I came to the conclusion that my lack of hops and small hands would permanently preclude me from ever dunking a basketball. Did I also have to face a life with no “Satisfaction?”

My fourth try for “Satisfaction” was 2002 at the Oakland Arena (Licks Tour). The Stones were about half-way through their show, when Keith laid on the first riffs of Satisfaction. The crowd instinctively sprung to its feet. Mick did not have to sing the words; everyone knew them.

I had finally achieved “Satisfaction.” It was orgasmic.

Since then, I have seen the Stones two more times, AT&T Park in San Francisco in 2005, and the Oakland Coliseum in 2006 (A Bigger Bang Tour), climaxing two more times with “Satisfaction.” If there is a Stones tour next year as rumored to celebrate five decades as the greatest rock n’ roll band on the planet, I will not be attending a show but making a pilgrimage.

Periodically, I am asked why I am such a Rolling Stones freak (six concerts, about 10 DVDs, more than 20 CDs, all the old albums in wax, the notorious tongue poster hangs beside Ronald Reagan in my man cave). The follow-up question usually asks, Why Mick and Keith and not John and Paul?

The answer is that I like the Beatles, always have. The opening chords of “Day Tripper” immediately get me revved up. “Abbey Road” is one of my favorite CDs. I still haven’t figured out “A Day in the Life,” much less “I am the Walrus.”

When considering the question of the Stones and Beatles (I always list them in this order), one has to explore the roots. The Stones grew up listening to Muddy Waters (origin of the band’s name), John Lee Hooker, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Robert Johnson, and Solomon Burke. The result is a much more rhythm-and-blues oriented band. The Beatles by contrast were influenced heavily by Elvis Presley and Buddy Holly. The blues make me swoon.

Another differentiator is Mick Jagger, himself. Nobody is blasé about Mick. He is one of the greatest showmen of his era. There is the magnetism of Mr. Jumpin Jack Flash himself. And yet, you cannot examine him alone as Keith Richards (one half of The Glimmer Twins) will always be part of the Stones story.

The Beatles stopped touring the mid-1960s. The Stones invented the rock n’ roll show in 1969 and became more innovative and outrageous as the years went by. My favorite CD hails from the 1969 tour, “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out,” recorded that November from Madison Square Garden.

stones69

Alas, a Beatles fan can only remember. Sadly, John and George are gone. There will be no more tours, only reissues of songs in different technology formats that we have already heard a gazillion times.

A Stones tour is always the subject of intense rumors. Where will the play? From the 400 songs in the band’s repository, which ones will make the set list? Will we achieve “Satisfaction” or not?

And today, July 12, 2012, we commemorate the 50th anniversary of founding of the Rolling Stones. We all wish we could have been at the Marquee Club on London’s Oxford Street to hear the first gig of the Stones. I was only seven years old at the time, growing up in a coal mining town in Western Pennsylvania. I was simply too young and too far away.

177399_10151042838078287_1165543580_o[1]

The most important point as we celebrate the band today is the fact that the Stones are still Rolling. Three of the original five (Mick, Keith and Charlie) are still playing. No other rock n’ roll band has stayed present (e.g., tours and CDs) and relevant for five decades. The Stones easily could have hung up the guitar picks and drum sticks literally years ago with bank accounts full and legacy intact. And yet they continue to bring joy to our lives.

They also seem to still get a charge out of what they do.

“I know it’s only rock ‘n roll, but I like it, like it, yes, I do.”

 

“I can’t get no satisfaction

I can’t get no satisfaction

‘Cause I try and I try and I try and I try
I can’t get no, I can’t get no

“When I’m drivin’ in my car
And that man comes on the radio
He’s tellin’ me more and more
About some useless information
Supposed to fire my imagination
I can’t get no, oh no, no, no
Hey hey hey, that’s what I say

“I can’t get no satisfaction
I can’t get no satisfaction
‘Cause I try and I try and I try and I try
I can’t get no, I can’t get no
When I’m watchin’ my T.V.
And that man comes on to tell me
How white my shirts can be
But he can’t be a man ’cause he doesn’t smoke
The same cigarettes as me
I can’t get no, oh no, no, no
Hey hey hey, that’s what I say

“I can’t get no satisfaction
I can’t get no girl reaction
‘Cause I try and I try and I try and I try
I can’t get no, I can’t get no

“When I’m ridin’ round the world
And I’m doin’ this and I’m signing that
And I’m tryin’ to make some girl
Who tells me baby better come back later next week
‘Cause you see I’m on a losing streak
I can’t get no, oh no, no, no
Hey hey hey, that’s what I say

“I can’t get no, I can’t get no
I can’t get no satisfaction
No satisfaction, no satisfaction, no satisfaction”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/(I_Can’t_Get_No)_Satisfaction

http://www.rollingstones.com/

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