Tag Archive: LinkedIn URL


Once upon a time the best and the brightest were convinced without any conceivable doubt: The world is flat.

They were so sure they were right … err correct … until this guy … (should I mention his name?) … Christopher Columbus proved them to be wrong. At least that is what we were taught in school.

columbus

Score one for a new way of seeing our world.

Sometimes it is difficult to overcome well entrenched, stubborn, resolute and mule-like analog thinking.

This also applies to the prevailing wisdom about one-page resumes taught by some journalism and communication professors/instructors.

Contemplating parochial school lessons emanating from the Baltimore Catechism, one learned that the Ten Commandments were handed down from on high to Moses (e.g., played by Charlton Heston). One still remembers the sketches of Moses holding up the tablets and instructing the masses to avoid killing people, refrain from stealing someone else’s possessions, and never-ever committing adultery against one’s spouse and/or mistress.

hestonmoses

Alas, I never found anything chiseled in rock declaring that any-and-all curriculum vitaes (e.g., resumes) being restricted to one page, and only one page. And yet I keep on meeting cowering-and-quivering college students who have been bludgeoned into reducing fonts, running on sentences and cramming and jamming as much as they can into one eight-by-eleven inch piece of paper to comply with those who proclaim that all resumes must be in one-page Ordnung. Verstehen Sie? You better.

Let me engage a little heresy here at the risk of being excommunicated and never being allowed to fill my growler ever again.

Has anyone in the leadership of the majority of these journalism schools ever heard of binary code? Yep, these are those itsy, bitsy, teeny, weeny digital on-and-off instructions that are forever changing the world, including journalism as we know it, whether we like it or not.

Want to look up Moore’s Law? Maybe you shouldn’t.

Why does the irreversible global shift from analog-to-digital matter when it comes to resumes or CVs? The reason is that each-and-every resume for any high five-figure or any six-figure job or above, and with increasingly frequency entry-level positions as well, is submitted online. Does it really matter if the CV is one page, if the words are being transmitted and reviewed electronically…sometimes by a human and other times by a machine?

SEO Perfect Company

Is the length more important than content? Both the human and the search engine are calibrated to search out certain words that fit the job description (Hint: “Really working well with people” doesn’t cut it).

Instead when it comes to public relations, marketing, investor relations and communications, the search engine as in search engine optimization or SEO is looking for the following and more:

  • Message Development
  • Social Media
  • Employee Communications
  • Search Engine Optimization
  • Search Engine Marketing
  • Crisis Communications
  • Investor Relations
  • Media Relations
  • Analyst Relations
  • Media Training
  • Multimedia Skills
  • Presentation Skills

Does it matter if the search engine spots these terms and others on one page or more? Almost DailyBrett humbly contends that content reigns supreme, not length, particularly in our digital age.

Keep in mind that many employers are now asking for LinkedIn profile URLs instead of resumes at least when it comes to online applications. Are the J-School Pharisees asking for LinkedIn profiles to be restricted to one page? Is this possible considering that LinkedIn profiles are exclusively online?

Shhhh! … Let’s not give them any ideas.

A final thought comes to mind, and maybe the most important one of all: Are all graduating seniors created equal?

One of the most common arguments advanced by the Flat Earth, One-Page Resume Society is that college seniors don’t have enough experience and educational accomplishments to require more than one page. They have the semblance of an argument here.

resume1

The Almost DailyBrett response is that some seniors overachieve and outperform compared to their colleagues. They have oodles of internships, jobs, relevant activities and skill sets in addition to their education (e.g., B.A. or B.S. degree). For them, it is extremely difficult to tell their entire story to prospective employers on only one page.

Why should we arbitrarily penalize the overachievers?

Besides the cover letters and the CVs that they ultimately transmit (think binary ones and zeroes) to would-be employers are ultimately their OWN cover letters and their resumes. Graduating seniors are adults. They will make their own decisions. They will rise and fall based upon what they upload. Let them decide.

They should not be handcuffed by yesterday’s analog thinking.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myth_of_the_Flat_Earth

http://www.biography.com/people/christopher-columbus-9254209

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curriculum_vitae

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_code

http://www.catholicity.com/baltimore-catechism/

http://christianity.about.com/od/biblestorysummaries/p/tencommandstory.htm

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/history/museum-gordon-moore-law.html

http://searchengineland.com/guide/what-is-seo

magnifying-glassWhat’s the difference between pubic relations and public relations?

How about the word “ass” as opposed to “as.”

One tiny little letter in each of these cases, but a ton of difference in context and of course, raised eyebrows.

Is it me and my friends went to the movies or my friends and I went to the movies? Hint “me” is always an object of a sentence. The “me and my friends” version I hear way too many times for comfort.

Some blog posts are harder to right than others.

Make that some blog posts are harder to WRITE than others.

As I finish the process of reviewing dozens of graduating senior public relations portfolios and grading final two-page executive memos, I am constantly reminded about the vital skill associated with the attention to detail.

If you want to succeed in public relations, marketing, investor relations, brand management, advertising, events planning etc., you must sweat the details. The client’s name must be spelled write…err right.

That’s an imperative.

The Microsoft spell checker is useful, but it fails to recognize when the wrong word is spelled correctly.

Trust me the client will clobber you for even one letter being out of place or not capitalized, particularly for a proper noun. The hosting service for Almost DailyBrett is WordPress, two words jammed together with the first letter of each, capitalized. Did you note that DailyBrett is not two distinct words, but two words married to each other and capitalized?

Nike is spelled NIKE. The same is true for NVIDIA. Facebook is not FaceBook. Do you want to misspell the company’s name for Mark Zuckerberg? Trust me even after a disastrous IPO, he still has the requisite amount of nanoseconds to note the misspelling.

Did you hear about the near miss of two planes in the air over DFW?

What is a “near miss?” It’s a collision with tons of flames and falling debris.

And yet that is NOT how we think about a “near miss.” Sometimes these wrong words sound right, and yet they are still wrong.

Ever hear about an untimely death? Sure you have, but when is a death ever, “timely”?

When I was toiling in the trenches for 10 years for LSI Logic, I was once asked by executive management why we wrote our news releases, advisories, contributed articles, briefing sheets in a particular fashion. I replied that we prepared them using AP style. That answer quickly ended the discussion. AP Style is the gold standard for Journalism, whether one is enamored with the wire service’s reporting or not.

Alas, I still have to repeatedly correct the use of over ten million dollars (three AP-style errors in just one little phrase) instead of the correct, more than $10 million.

Think of it this way: the horse jumped over the fence and five is more than four. If you remember this rule, you will never get it wrong.

Who is the subject, and whom is the object. (And you thought The Who was a classic rock band)

I could go on into infinity, but I will resist the temptation.

As educators in professional schools of great universities, we are preparing our students to succeed in a brutal job environment. Public relations and advertising agencies, corporate PR shops, non-profits, events planning firms are being besieged by graduating seniors seeking out jobs, internships and even informational interviews. These newly minted graduates are looking for any and all ways to earn any amount of legal tender.

Are these students writing tweet-style cover letters? Are they writing these letters directly to the hiring manager or to a machine that will swallow them up, never to be seen again? Are they starting these letters with, “To Whom It May Concern?” Please, no.

When it comes to their curriculum vitae (if you don’t know what the Latin stands for, look it up), are students listing their academic credentials first or their directly related work experience no matter how meager? Graduating seniors need to immediately transition themselves mentally to being professionals.

resume1

Do you (student) work well with people? Are you going to tell a hiring manager just that? Please don’t with sugar on top.

What is the Return on Investment (ROI) in she or he “works well with people” statement? Why would any employer spend precious SG&A dollars for someone who works well with people? What’s in it for the employer?

A student must differentiate herself or himself. Tell the perspective employer what you have done and what value you bring to the party.

Think of it this way: the tweet-style cover letter is used to quickly (about 4.3 seconds for recruiters…but who is counting?) entice the employer to read the resume.

The resume or curriculum vita (CV) is intended to secure an interview.

The interview leads to a job offer.

The job offers lead to an HR packet being overnighted to your domicile.

Even with that plan, you still have to be ready for an employment curve ball. What if you were asked to either submit a LinkedIn URL or a CV? Which one would you choose? Think of that choice as a one-and-zeroes binary code, social media trap.

And if you don’t have a LinkedIn URL, get one pronto.

And when you do, sweat the details of your Linkedin page…err LinkedIn page.

https://www.apstylebook.com/

http://www.linkedin.com/

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