Tag Archive: Mark Parker


Nike Becomes First Corporation To Secede From The Union

Company Calls For Nike Athletes To Not Salute American Flag, Sing National Anthem

BEAVERSTON, OR – July 4, 2019 – Fresh off its historic decision to suspend sales of Betsy Ross inspired Colonial American flag shoes, Nike today announced the world’s leading athletic apparel company has seceded from the United States of America.

Starting today, the company will only fly the Nike “Swoosh” at its corporate campus in the Portland metropolitan area.

In addition, Nike (NYSE: NKE) called upon all major sports leagues, including the NFL, NBA, MLB, and FIFA, to immediately cease the display of the American flag and the playing of the “Star Spangled Banner” at all sporting venues in which Nike athletes compete.

The company also encouraged its sponsored athletes to refrain from any gesture or action, which constitutes approval or respect for the red, white and blue symbols of repression, injustice and the culture of toxic masculinity.

Nike said it was making its July 4 independence declaration on behalf of its employees, shareholders, suppliers, distributors, but most of all its athletes, starting with the U.S. Women’s National Team (USWNT) competing this coming Sunday July 7 against The Netherlands at the World Cup final in Lyon, France.

“We have designed a special kit for our soccer gals that drops any-and-all colors and logos associated with the United States of America to instead only include the iconic Nike “swoosh,” said Nike Chief Executive Officer Mark Parker. “Instead of red, white and blue, the Nike Women’s National Team (NWNT) will ‘Just Do It’ in specially designed sport jerseys, which are the same color as Megan Rapinoe’s hair.”

Nike’s eminently qualified empirical historian who sacrificed everything, Colin Kaepernick, recommended the company immediately pull from all store shelves the offensive American flag  shoes with their 13 stars and stripes weaved in 1776 by Betsy Ross. Kaepernick lectured Nike complicit management the flag was directly associated with all things wrong — past and present — about America.

Parker said management unanimously implemented this request, but also wanted to do more, much more. The company CEO said the Board of Directors determined that Nike athletes should no longer be compelled to stand at attention before the American flag or be forced to sing the national anthem.

“The best way to solve this problem was for Nike to strongly request to all sports governing bodies refrain from displaying so-called ‘Old Glory’ and playing the overrated “Star Spangled Banner,” said Parker. “We also decided to undertake the boldest patriotic step ever contemplated by any publicly traded company: We have declared our independence from the United States of America.”

Similar to Vatican City within the outer confines of Rome or Monaco enveloped by neighboring France, the company’s Beaverston campus surrounded by the United States of America will be the home of the world’s first ever corporate nation: Nike. The “Benjamin” will continue to serve as Nike’s official currency.

The Stars and Stripes will be lowered at dusk for the last time today, July 4.

Long will fly the “Swoosh” flag over the Nation of Nike.

God Bless Nike!

About NIKE, Inc.

NIKE, Inc., based near Beaverston, Oregon, is the world’s leading designer, marketer and distributor of politically correct athletic footwear, apparel, equipment and accessories for a wide variety of sports and fitness activities. The Nation of NIKE, Inc. subsidiary brands include Nation of Converse, which designs, markets and distributes athletic lifestyle footwear, apparel and accessories; and Nation of Hurley, which designs, markets and distributes surf and youth lifestyle footwear, apparel and accessories. For more information about NIKE, Inc.’s declaration of independence and its decision to never again fly the American flag on the campus of its new country, please visit http://kaepernick.nike.com. Non-Americans can also visit http://news.nike.com and follow @NIKE.

https://www.gq.com/story/nike-betsy-ross-shoe-colin-kaepernick

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nike-reportedly-pulls-betsy-ross-flag-shoes-over-concerns-from-colin-kaepernick-reports-today-2019-07-01/

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2019/jul/4/editorial-nike-disrespects-betsy-ross/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/act-four/when-racists-try-to-poison-our-national-symbols-we-shouldnt-just-surrender/2019/07/03/926a225e-9dcc-11e9-b27f-ed2942f73d70_story.html?utm_term=.c4063e96def0

This Independence Day, Nike Appeases America Haters and Dictators

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2018/09/04/nike-takes-a-knee/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2018/09/25/culture-of-toxic-masculinity/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2013/08/03/university-of-nike/

 

Mark Parker of Nike is also one of my mutual fund advisors.

Ditto for Marc Benioff of Salesforce.com

Let’s not forget of Dennis Muilenburg of Boeing.

Can’t tell you how many times Almost DailyBrett has been told to invest anything and everything into mutual funds.

For the record 70 percent of your author’s Charles Schwab portfolio is held in mutual funds, the largest amount managed by William Danoff of the Fidelity Contrafund.

Having made this point, let’s take a contrarian stand.

Why can’t investors create their own mutual fund comprised of individual and diversified stocks within their own portfolios?

Whoa … aren’t you the investor taking on too much … risk? Shouldn’t you diversify?

The humble answers are “not necessarily” and “yes.”

As legendary investor Peter Lynch once said: “Know what you own, and know why you own it.”

When it comes to investing and in the spirit of Lynch’s axiom, Almost DailyBrett follows these self-formulated rules:

  • Never invest in a stock in which you personally detest/loathe the lead executive (e.g., Oracle’s Larry Ellison)
  • Buy shares in firms you personally use or have a 100 percent understanding of how the company makes money (e.g., Apple).

For example, ever cutesy Scott McNealy of extinct Sun Microsystems once labeled Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer and Bill Gates as Ballmer and Butthead. McNealy would have been funny, if his company stock wasn’t trading at the very same time at $3 per share.

Whatever happened to Scott McNealy? His company was devoured by Oracle.

Another example: your author won’t touch Bitcoin because even though it is the choice of money launderers around the world, the crypto currency is not associated with any country and there is zero logical explanation of how it makes money.

Isn’t Tim Cook A CEO?

Why is Tim Cook my mutual fund portfolio manager?

Doesn’t Cook run the largest capitalized – $1 trillion-plus – publicly traded company in the world? Absolutely.

Almost DailyBrett clearly understands that Apple is not a mutual fund, but still it offers the complexity, confidence and diversity of a mutual fund.

Apple plays in the hardware (i.e., smart phones, tablets, wearables, PCs) space. Ditto for software (e.g., iOS) and services (e.g., iTunes). Think of it this way, Apple has as many if more investors as any mutual fund … including mutual funds themselves – both buy side and sell side institutional investors – and 75 million shares recently bought by Warren Buffett too.

And who runs this diversified enterprise with the expectation of $60 billion to $62 billion on the top line in the next (fourth) quarter? Revenues grew 17 percent year-over-year. Gross margin remained steady at 38 percent. EPS jumped year-over-year from $1.67 to $2.34 and dividends grew from $0.63 to $0.73.

The dilemma for every Apple investor, particularly today, is when is it time to ring the register at least for a portion of the shares? Almost DailyBrett does not hear very many bells clanging.

There is little doubt that Apple is tearing the cover off the ball. Apple has proven it is not necessarily the number of smart phones sold – even though these mobile devices are an absolute must for our lives – in many ways it is the average sales price, climbing closer to four figures for every unit.

Back to Danoff and Fidelity Contrafund. Today it has a reported $130 billion in assets under management. Cook counters with $1 trillion in investor confidence in Apple’s shares.

Which “mutual fund” manager would you choose, if you could only select, one?

And for diversification, you package Apple with Boeing (U.S. commercial airliner and defense aircraft innovator and manufacturer) …

And Nike, the #1 athletic apparel manufacturer in die Welt.

Finally, Almost DailyBrett has bought Salesforce.com nine times and sold eight times for a profit. To describe Salesforce.com as business software company seriously understates its business strategy.

With all due respect to Satya Nadella of Microsoft, Salesforce.com is THE Cloud pioneer selling software as a service (SaaS) to enterprises around the world.

Let’s see: Apple, Boeing, Nike and Salesforce.com in the Almost DailyBrett mutual fund.

Is your author right? Only time will tell. Will this “mutual fund” adjust and change its holdings? No doubt.

Here’s the point: As Ken Fisher of Fisher Investments would say, it’s time to “graduate” from pure mutual funds.

There is risk associated with selecting stocks for your portfolio, but isn’t that also the case for mutual funds? Some think that mutual funds are no brainers. Not true, and let’s not forget the fees.

When it comes to my “mutual fund” portfolio — AAPL, BA, NKE, CRM — the only fees yours truly pays are $4.95 per trade.

Not bad, not bad at all.

https://fundresearch.fidelity.com/mutual-funds/summary/316071109

https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2018/07/apple-reports-third-quarter-results/

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