Tag Archive: NVIDIA


From a public relations and mass communications standpoint, we need to leave the past — most of all recriminations — to the mass media. Let them focus on the fact that we again slept at dawn.

Hint: They were sleeping as well.

We need to envision and more importantly, credibly and practically project better times in the future. We need to balance our justified health concerns with our economic hopes.

Will we have a national resurrection by Easter Sunday, April 12? Maybe? Most likely, not?

If not, the media will happily tell us how our loving optimist-in-chief somehow failed in the face of continued darkness.

And yet his approval rating continues to rise, and his score for handling the corona virus reaches 60 percent thumbs up against 38 percent thumbs down.

As Teddy Roosevelt (pardon the paraphrase from heaven, POTUS #26) told us in his famous 1910 speech to the students at Paris’ Sorbonne, it’s not Gloomy Gus or Negative Nancy who counts, or how the strong man or woman stumbles or how she or he could have done better.

The credit belongs to those who are in the arena.

We need more of those, who dare to suggest with credibility that yes life will get better. We are not eternally condemned to the boredom of our living rooms.

Some day we will standing in line for the barista, waiting for our beer or wine, actually ordering our food to a table in a restaurant … our hearts thumping with thousands of others, anticipating the first guitar riff or standing up for the kickoff.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News “virtual town hall” event on the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak with members of the coronavirus task force in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

It takes courage to stand up in front of this wall of negativity and suggest that life may be better sooner … much sooner … as opposed to later.

It takes moxy to purchase shares of best-in-breed stocks (i.e., Apple, Microsoft, Nike, NVIDIA, McDonalds, Starbucks …) as the markets refuse for weeks to stretch two or more positive trading days in a row. Volatility will eventually be tamed, most likely not now.

It takes compassion to swipe our credit card at our local coffee place, order books online from our regional bookseller, call for take out at our favorite Italian place. With our economic freedom maintained, we can choose who and how much to support.

They have been there for us. Isn’t time for us to be there for them?

It’s so easy to hunker down and to shut down for the “common good.” It’s harder to dream again, and to express hope.

We Need Good News

“Hope is believing good will come, even in bad times. 

“Hope is knowing that this too shall pass.

“Hope is knowing no matter how afraid we are, our higher power will be with us.

“Hope is knowing that we never have to be alone again. It’s knowing that “Time Is On Our Side.’

“Hope is giving up control. Hope is knowing we didn’t have control in the first place.” — Rolling Stones lead guitarist Ronnie Wood.

Almost DailyBrett believes there are more than a few, who have major problems with the United States and its world’s largest gross domestic product (GDP) at $21.99 trillion (prior to the impact of the Corona virus, COVID-19).

To them the USA needs to redistribute the pie, not expand it to offer more pieces for everyone.

The word “balance” seemingly does not exist in ivory towers on campuses, the deep state or in some media empires.

Until recently, climate change dominated. “How dare” anyone suggest thoughtful consideration of those who work and thrive in our world-best economy?

And now the little corona virus bugger has replaced the planet — at least for now — as the single most priority. Forget about producing products we use or compensating our employees. Allocating $25 million for the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in DC is just so vital to beating this global epidemic.

As we debate looking for the positive versus being Gloomy Gus or Debbie Downer, we know two things for certain:

Teddy Roosevelt is forever enshrined on Mt. Rushmore.

No one will ever build statues to critics, including Negative Nancy.

https://www.nationalreview.com/news/id-love-to-have-it-open-by-easter-trump-hopeful-economy-will-be-revived-in-coming-weeks/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=breaking&utm_campaign=newstrack&utm_term=19820067

http://www.theodore-roosevelt.com/trsorbonnespeech.html

https://news.gallup.com/poll/298313/president-trump-job-approval-rating.aspx

 

If all goes well with the regulators and the lawyers, LSI Logic will slowly disappear over the horizon, going into the history books later this year, reduced to a Silicon Valley afterthought.

Keep in mind, we are talking about two iterations of the company: First, the LSI Logic (NYSE: LSI) created by Wilf Corrigan 33 years ago; and second the present day LSI Corporation (NASDAQ: LSI), on the precipice of being ushered into oblivion after eight-short years under the “management” of Wilf’s successor, Abhi Talwalkar.

There was a misguided celebration by some in the financial community in 2005 when Wilf at 67-years young turned over the reins to Abhi. This was the same Wilf Corrigan, who grew LSI Logic from zero revenues in 1981 to $1.8 billion when he finally hung up the cleats. No one was complaining when LSI Logic’s stock reached a post-split price of $90. Then there was the bursting of the Internet Bubble and the stock fell back to $3.

This is the same Wilf Corrigan, who founded the custom semiconductor business, known as ASICs or Application Specific Integrated Circuits. Sony reached out to LSI Logic when it needed a critical processor for the first two generations of the PlayStation. This is the same LSI Logic that pioneered the concept of System on a Chip. The company eventually reached $2.7 billion in revenues before the Bubble Burst.

When I was joined the company in 1995, I was awed by the sophistication of the company’s innovation, its library of complex intellectual property cores, and its all-star lineup of future technology C-level executives: John Daane (Altera); Brian Halla (National Semiconductor); Moshe Gavrielov (Xilinx); Jen-Hsun Huang (NVIDIA); Ronnie Vashishta (eASIC) and Bruce Entin (Silicon Valley Communication Partners). Bruce was not only the best boss in my career, but is an even better friend.

Enter Abhi in 2005. He took it from there until last December 16 when Avago Technologies announced its $6.6 billion cash acquisition of LSI. If Winston Churchill was still around to assess Abhi’s eight-year stewardship, he would be tempted to state: “Never in recorded history has so many waited so long for so little.”

Wilf’s Enduring Legacy

Looking back at my 10 years as the director of Corporate Public Relations for at LSI Logic (proper spelling), your author was honored and humbled to have the opportunity to work closely with Wilf Corrigan until shortly after he stepped down. Almost DailyBrett is proud of his tenure, but saddened by what could have been and the upcoming silent burial of LSI Logic.

Let’s face it: Many were downright scared of Wilf. He had the reputation for being a tough, no-nonsense businessman, a calling card he earned from his 1970s chairmanship of Fairchild. For some reason, Almost DailyBrett was not intimidated, but always respectful. Your author found Wilf to be extremely well read and not just in the business of technology, but politics, history and geography. Particularly on road trips, we talked for literally hours on these subjects.

An irony of Wilf’s career was Gould’s hostile takeover attempt of Fairchild circa 1979. It didn’t take long for Wilf to realize that Fairchild was in play. In the end, Wilf and the Fairchild Board of Directors found a White Knight in Schlumberger. In turn, Schlumberger drove Fairchild into the ground. The Schlumberger acquisition of Fairchild provided Wilf with the opportunity to create his own company, LSI Logic or Large Scale Integration Logic. And now his creation is being put out of its agony by Avago. Did the company have to end this way?

Mexico Acquiring Guatemala?

When it was time for Wilf to step down, LSI Logic HR head Jon Gibson unearthed Abhi from Intel. This was the same Intel that created legends by the names of Andy Grove, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce and Craig Barrett. Would Abhi do the same for LSI Logic? lsi

Abhi guided the rebranding of LSI (dropping “Logic” from the name) and adopting the “flower” logo. Later LSI acquired Agere Systems for $4 billion, the technology equivalent of Mexico absorbing Guatemala. LSI’s present revenues are $2.5 billion. Why Agere? And for what purpose?

Until the announcement of the Avago acquisition, LSI’s stock remained mired for years at $8 or less. Being charitable, one can easily conclude the company underperformed. And now it will be absorbed into Avago, a company that once was HP’s semiconductor business.

An oft-heard complaint about Wall Street revolves around executive compensation, especially those who walk away with millions even when they underachieve. Abhi ($2.09 million annual salary, not including options) will inevitably get a huge package in recognition of his starring role in driving the company into the abyss. Undoubtedly, he will live a very comfortable life. LSIlogo

And LSI Logic…it will always be LSI Logic to me…deserved a better fate, a much better fate.

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/12/16/avago-to-buy-lsi-for-6-6-billion/?_r=0

http://allthingsd.com/20131216/in-chip-deal-singapores-avago-to-acquire-lsi-for-6-6-billion/

http://www.zacks.com/stock/news/118176/is-the-lsi-acquisition-in-jeopardy

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2013/12/16/avago-lsi-acquisition/4038113/

http://finance.yahoo.com/q/pr?s=LSI+Profile

magnifying-glassWhat’s the difference between pubic relations and public relations?

How about the word “ass” as opposed to “as.”

One tiny little letter in each of these cases, but a ton of difference in context and of course, raised eyebrows.

Is it me and my friends went to the movies or my friends and I went to the movies? Hint “me” is always an object of a sentence. The “me and my friends” version I hear way too many times for comfort.

Some blog posts are harder to right than others.

Make that some blog posts are harder to WRITE than others.

As I finish the process of reviewing dozens of graduating senior public relations portfolios and grading final two-page executive memos, I am constantly reminded about the vital skill associated with the attention to detail.

If you want to succeed in public relations, marketing, investor relations, brand management, advertising, events planning etc., you must sweat the details. The client’s name must be spelled write…err right.

That’s an imperative.

The Microsoft spell checker is useful, but it fails to recognize when the wrong word is spelled correctly.

Trust me the client will clobber you for even one letter being out of place or not capitalized, particularly for a proper noun. The hosting service for Almost DailyBrett is WordPress, two words jammed together with the first letter of each, capitalized. Did you note that DailyBrett is not two distinct words, but two words married to each other and capitalized?

Nike is spelled NIKE. The same is true for NVIDIA. Facebook is not FaceBook. Do you want to misspell the company’s name for Mark Zuckerberg? Trust me even after a disastrous IPO, he still has the requisite amount of nanoseconds to note the misspelling.

Did you hear about the near miss of two planes in the air over DFW?

What is a “near miss?” It’s a collision with tons of flames and falling debris.

And yet that is NOT how we think about a “near miss.” Sometimes these wrong words sound right, and yet they are still wrong.

Ever hear about an untimely death? Sure you have, but when is a death ever, “timely”?

When I was toiling in the trenches for 10 years for LSI Logic, I was once asked by executive management why we wrote our news releases, advisories, contributed articles, briefing sheets in a particular fashion. I replied that we prepared them using AP style. That answer quickly ended the discussion. AP Style is the gold standard for Journalism, whether one is enamored with the wire service’s reporting or not.

Alas, I still have to repeatedly correct the use of over ten million dollars (three AP-style errors in just one little phrase) instead of the correct, more than $10 million.

Think of it this way: the horse jumped over the fence and five is more than four. If you remember this rule, you will never get it wrong.

Who is the subject, and whom is the object. (And you thought The Who was a classic rock band)

I could go on into infinity, but I will resist the temptation.

As educators in professional schools of great universities, we are preparing our students to succeed in a brutal job environment. Public relations and advertising agencies, corporate PR shops, non-profits, events planning firms are being besieged by graduating seniors seeking out jobs, internships and even informational interviews. These newly minted graduates are looking for any and all ways to earn any amount of legal tender.

Are these students writing tweet-style cover letters? Are they writing these letters directly to the hiring manager or to a machine that will swallow them up, never to be seen again? Are they starting these letters with, “To Whom It May Concern?” Please, no.

When it comes to their curriculum vitae (if you don’t know what the Latin stands for, look it up), are students listing their academic credentials first or their directly related work experience no matter how meager? Graduating seniors need to immediately transition themselves mentally to being professionals.

resume1

Do you (student) work well with people? Are you going to tell a hiring manager just that? Please don’t with sugar on top.

What is the Return on Investment (ROI) in she or he “works well with people” statement? Why would any employer spend precious SG&A dollars for someone who works well with people? What’s in it for the employer?

A student must differentiate herself or himself. Tell the perspective employer what you have done and what value you bring to the party.

Think of it this way: the tweet-style cover letter is used to quickly (about 4.3 seconds for recruiters…but who is counting?) entice the employer to read the resume.

The resume or curriculum vita (CV) is intended to secure an interview.

The interview leads to a job offer.

The job offers lead to an HR packet being overnighted to your domicile.

Even with that plan, you still have to be ready for an employment curve ball. What if you were asked to either submit a LinkedIn URL or a CV? Which one would you choose? Think of that choice as a one-and-zeroes binary code, social media trap.

And if you don’t have a LinkedIn URL, get one pronto.

And when you do, sweat the details of your Linkedin page…err LinkedIn page.

https://www.apstylebook.com/

http://www.linkedin.com/

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