Tag Archive: Pac-12 Networks


On any given autumn Saturday there are seemingly 27 different college football games on nearly a dozen networks, all available in HD with exceptional video and sound.

And let’s not forget the HDTV games on Thursday and Friday nights as well.

For the addictive channel surfing male of species in particular, there are so many games to choose. There are cold microbrews in the fridge, snacks on the table, and an always available WC down the hall, all provided free of charge in HVAC comfort.

Contrast this climate controlled football nirvana with sphincters yelling in your ear, blocking your view, $10 making-love-in-a-canoe beers, lines for the commode, and endless commercial and instant replay reviews on days/nights which can be blistering or freezing and wet.

As a 30-year and counting Autzen Stadium season ticket holder, Almost DailyBrett has been tempted on more than occasion to leave the overpriced tickets (includes the required Duck Athletic Fund donation) on the coffee table, and watch the game in high-definition comfort at home. Wonder how many Oregon fans will take this option this weekend considering that Pac-12 Networks has decided the game against Montana will start … at 7:45 pm PDT, 10:45 pm EDT.

Seriously, how many folks in the Eastern and Central time zones are going to be watching Pac-12 Networks at midnight, when literally millions in the Pacific time zone cannot even access the network because of contractual issues? If the conference can’t be marketed east of the Rockies, then what’s the point of the late kickoff?

We know from the reporting of the Los Angeles Times that way too many UCLA fans are showing up dressed as empty seats at the 80,616 capacity Rose Bowl in Pasadena. Consider the optics last Saturday as an “announced” crowd of 36,000 attended UCLA’s latest loss, this time against juggernaut San Diego State.

Was the Rose Bowl half full or half empty?

Thankfully, this season will be the last in which the Pac-12 “Championship” game will be played in the nearly vacant Levi’s Stadium in gridlocked Santa Clara on a Friday night (December 6). The announced attendance last year was 35,114. How many freebies were given out to pad the crowd?

Do you know Pac-12 Commissioner, Larry Scott?

The only winner was Fox Sports, providing the network with Friday night “programming.” The losers were the Pac-12 teams, the conference and of course, the fans.

The Networks Don’t Care About The Fans

Alabama is playing its September 21 home game against Southern Miss at 11 am local time.

Does anyone at the sports networks have any appreciation for the expected temps in Tuscaloosa, Alabama when the humid sun is nearing its zenith point for the day? Nick Saban is fried about it (pardon the pun), but he and the Alabama administration seem to be powerless to stop the madness.

Alabama is a perpetual national champion from God’s anointed conference, the SEC, and the school can’t convince the networks to find a  broadcast “window” that works for its fans, friends and supporters?

The networks and the universities want the optics and the revenue that comes from packed stadiums, but are seemingly indifferent to the potential of heat stroke/frost bite by fans. And what’s a fan to do?

How about watching the same cupcake, body-bagger game (e.g., Alabama vs. New Mexico State) in air conditioned comfort in High-Def for free?

Almost DailyBrett initially could not believe when one of my USC fraternity brothers announced that he would not be hosting his long-time tailgate parties at the LA Coliseum this fall. Instead, he said he would “Stub Hub” a game or two, and watch the rest of the games in HDTV.

“We also abstained from buying tickets, so, while we may attend a game or two, will be watching most of them at home.”

One may be tempted to dismiss the above story as simply anecdotal. What is not anecdotal is that college football attendance is down for the major conferences, save the ACC.

“What A Better Way To Spend An Autumn Afternoon” — ABC’s Chris Schenkel (1923-2005)

Almost DailyBrett remembers the days when there was exactly one college football game broadcast on Saturday afternoons by ABC.

The supply of the sport was obviously way under the demand, considering the literally millions of Americans who want to follow their alma maters and favorite teams.

Athletic departments needed additional revenues to fund a wide-variety of sports, the majority of which run in the red.

The networks came to the rescue, but predictably there are no free lunches. The “strings” that came with the deal was the loss of total control, particularly when it came to scheduling and kick off times. The universities, their alumni departments, and most of all their fans couldn’t engage in advance planning with game times being announced only six days before.

Almost DailyBrett is heartened by the complaints coming from Nick Saban and others. The universities want alumni and fans on campus. They want them to sing the fight song, hang out at the tailgate parties, buy the expensive jerseys, have a wonderful time and most of all … write checks.

To this date in recorded history, an empty seat or bench has never written a check to a university.

Doubt this empirical fact of life will ever change.

https://www.latimes.com/sports/ucla/story/2019-09-05/ucla-football-attendance-issues-crowded-sports-field

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/27581049/alabama-not-happy-start-due-heat

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2019/09/10/alabama-football-is-sick-tired-day-games-would-rather-beat-its-cupcake-opponents-night/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2019/08/01/6-a-m-tailgate-parties/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2019/01/02/the-conference-of-champions/

 

 

“Anytime. Any Place. Any Conditions.” — Former Oregon basketball coach Dick Harter discussing 4 am practices.

“I’d kick off at 6 a.m. When you wake up — if you’re a college football player or coach, you want to wake up and you want to play football.” — UCLA Football Coach Chip Kelly.

Does the “Anytime” motto really apply to long-suffering Pac-12 fans, including the select oh-so-few who chose to show up for the conference “championship” game last December?

Does anybody actually care about the good folks who make generous athletic department contributions and buy football season tickets?

For Almost DailyBrett, this fall will mark his 30th as an Oregon season ticket holder. Your author is therefore entitled to ask:

When is Oregon playing Stanford? To-Be-Determined, TBD.

When is Oregon playing Washington? TBD.

When is Oregon playing USC? TBD.

When is the kickoff for the Civil War game between Oregon and Oregon State? TBD

And who is doing the To-Be-Determining?

Are we waiting for the 12 university presidents and athletic directors to set the times for these games and hundreds more? Fat chance.

The universities have absolutely no say when it comes to answering the week-by-week TBD questions. Pac-12 universities in particular prostitute themselves to the sports networks.

The $5.3 million paid yearly Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott is now exploring 9 am PDT/PST kickoffs in order to ensure conference teams make the football highlight shows in God’s anointed Eastern and Central time zones. Highlight shows?

What? Larry, you just received a $500,000 annual pay raise for that “outside the box” thinking?

Bloody Mary breakfast tailgates as the sun rises over the stadium parking lot? Middle of the night drives home?

Anybody consider the safety of the fans?

“We Don’t Control Our Schedule And When We Kick Off” 

(Washington Coach Chris Petersen) “should be thanking ESPN for actually having a relationship.” – ESPN’s Kirk Herbstreit.

“The hardest thing with Saturdays is when you wake up and then you’ve got to wait until 7 at night. But we’re also big on we don’t control our schedule and when we kick off. So tell us where it is and when we’re kicking off, and we’ll be there.” — Chip Kelly

Who runs the Pac-12 universities? ESPN and Fox or the university presidents?

As a proud capitalist Almost DailyBrett understands that cash is king, and that obviously applies to contract broadcast fees.

Bur isn’t the money donated by alumni (e.g., Phil Knight), just as green? How about university athletic fund members and season ticket holders?

We know the university presidents and athletic directors are in bed with the networks, but what about the fans who fill up the stadiums and buy over-priced beer, snacks and trinkets?

Oregon’s first two-games against Auburn and Nevada are set for 4:30 pm(PDT) kickoffs. Sounds good.

Oregon’s next game against Montana is scheduled for a 7:45 pm start or 10:45 pm in the EDT and 9:45 pm CDT. What’s the point for such a late kickoff when virtually no one in the Eastern and Central time zones will watch the game?

Pac-12 (programming) After-Dark?

More importantly, why should Oregon fans wait until every other football game is played that day (September 14), and then be faced with a midnight drive back home. Heck, isn’t it easier to simply watch the game at home in high-definition comfort?

Maybe that is the point for the networks. Why not play these games in sterile studios instead of near-empty stadiums and forget about the fans?

Making The Pac-12 Great Again?

Don’t university administrators want to bring alumni back to campus for some school spirit, social inebriation, and some check writing too?

How about the energy that comes from the student section?

Why can’t the Pac-12 presidents huddle with overpaid and overrated conference commissioner Larry Scott and declare:

Our football games are going to be played between 12:30 pm PDT/PST and 5 pm PDT/PST, which are the best times for our fans whether they are attending in person or watching on television. We provide great content to ESPN, Fox, Pac-12 Network and others. They are welcome to cover our games.”

Undoubtedly Harvard-Head lawyer Scott will point to existing television contracts and the fact that every Pac-12 game is televised. Keep in mind that contracts expire. They are typically renewed. Let’s get better terms.

Almost DailyBrett has noted those  poor souls, who were born in the Pacific and Mountain time zones, lost the biological lottery. We are two-or-three hours behind the rest of the nation. That’s a fact of life, but not an excuse.

Why don’t we concentrate on Making The Pac-12 Great Again?

Let’s schedule our football games, particularly homecoming contests, at times and places, which are convenient for the vast majority of our fans, alumni and students.  If the East of the Hudson types want to believe we all exist in Baskets of Deplorables, we can only conclude that mindset says more about them than us.

The Pac-12 universities, their respective presidents and athletic directors need to declare their independence — or at least co-existence for the good people who matter — alumni, students and friends, those who actually go to the games.

https://www.oregonlive.com/ducks/2019/05/canzano-pac-12s-biggest-news-commissioner-larry-scott-got-a-raise-to-5300000-a-year.html

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/27259246/pac-12-commish-exploring-idea-9-games

https://goducks.com/schedule.aspx?path=football

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2017/11/05/pac-12-after-midnight/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2019/01/02/the-conference-of-champions/

 

(Washington Coach Chris Petersen) “should be thanking ESPN for actually having a relationship.” – MSESPN’s Kirk Herbstreit.

Really Kirk? You just personified the word, “arrogant.”

How dare Coach Petersen or any other mortal speak out against Made for Sports Networks/ Night Owl football games.

The Pac-12 and its $3 billion network masters have come up with this season’s not-so-subtle marketing spin: “Pac-12 After Dark.” The purpose is to provide Atlantic Seaboard and Midwest late-night programming for MSESPN and Fox Sports.

Better than infomercials, right?

What’s next for the conference: “Pac-12 After Midnight or Midnight Football Madness”?

Naturally, the three time-zone separation of the Left Coast and two hours for the forgotten time zone (e.g., Mountain) are a pure fact of geography. No argument. But does mean the Pac-12 should kiss the rings of the network masters?

More to the point, the late-night Pac-12 kickoffs make it oh-so-easy for the Football Pharisees on in God’s Time Zone (e.g., Eastern) to only focus on their anointed conferences: ACC, Big 10, Big 12 and of course, the ESECPN.

The Pac-12 champion has already been ruled out of the playoffs. Thank you Heather Dinich.

The Big Five Conferences are in reality in the Big Four Conferences.

Whattyathink Big 10 Joey Galloway and Herbstreit? Concur SEC Jesse Palmer and Rece Davis?

These nocturnal kickoff times (e.g., 10:45 pm EDT/7:45 pm PDT for last night’s USC vs. Arizona game) are rendering the “Conference of Champions” as virtually irrelevant when it comes to the College Football Playoff, but these games do provide entertainment before last call is proclaimed.

When will the Pac-12 Conference championship be decided? The answer is December 1 at 8pm  EST/5 pm PST in traffic gridlocked Santa Clara, CA on a Friday night.

And when will the other major conference games be played?

All of them are on Saturday, December 2: ACC in Charlotte, Big 10 in Indianapolis, Big 12 in Arlington, and SEC in Atlanta. The Pac-12 champion will be yesterday’s news … literally.

Thank you so much Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott for selling out the conference to the lowest bidder.

Grooving to Big 10 and SEC Networks in Pac-12 Territory

The author of Almost DailyBrett resides in one of the six Pac-12 states, so does that mean I can watch Pac-12 Networks?

If you subscribe to Charter Cable or Direct TV, the unfortunate answer is you can binge watch the SEC and Big 10 networks on the left coast, but not Pac-12 Networks. Reportedly, the conference has been in “negotiations” with these two providers for four-plus years.

What good is it to live in a Pac-12 state and watch Southern Eastern Conference and Big-10 sports? If a conference network is not available to its suffering fans, does the network make any sound?

And when our games are actually selected for broadcast for the major networks, you get to wait for the real major conferences to play their games before our nocturnal kickoffs.

Where Are the Pac-12 University Presidents?

Larry Scott was hired to shake up the sleepy Pac-12 commissioner’s office.

To his credit, he brought in the all-important Salt Lake City and Denver media markets with the accession of Utah and Colorado to the Pac-12. At this point the move appears to have benefited the two Mountain Zone schools with meager benefit to the rest of the conference.

The aforementioned Pac-12 Network is giving MSESPN and Fox Sports more reasons to avoid the conference teams with the possible exception of big market, USC.

The questions remain: Where are the Pac-12 university presidents?

Do they care more about television contracts than their students, alumni, student-athletes and fans?

Do they not comprehend the safety issues for thousands of people who are driving in the wee-morning hours after literally hours of libations and football?

There was a day in which Pac-12 games were played at civilized times including 12:30 pm, 1 pm, 3:30 pm and 5 pm, which allows them to be in the half-time discussions on the east coast.

Why can’t the university presidents deem that conference games will start no later than 6 pm PDT/PST and 7 pm (Arizona time in regards to the early fall heat)?

And while they are weighing whether selling out to the networks is a more pressing necessity than the basic mission of the university: educating students for the data-driven careers of tomorrow, they may also want to collectively ask the following Texas-ism:

Is Larry Scott all hat and no cattle?

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/865692254/Commissioner-Dont-expect-Pac-12-after-dark-to-go-away-anytime-soon.html

http://www.oregonlive.com/collegefootball/index.ssf/2015/10/monday_morning_news_notes_link_24.html

http://www.bendbulletin.com/sports/5662001-151/pac-12-after-dark-debate-lives-on

https://pac-12.com/networks

 

Should the school

Charter Spectrum Provides Unprecedented Volatility to Customers

Kathleen Sebelius Named Charter Chief Information Officer 

STAMFORD, CT., May 15, 2016 – Capitalizing on its legacy Sputnik technology cluster, Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ: SELL) today introduced its new suite of binary Internet and cable TV solutions, providing its long-suffering customer base with unprecedented opportunities to endure Sometimes On, Sometimes Not™ Internet and cable.itnightmare

Charter with its binary Internet and cable television, replicates the on-and-off repetition of digital semiconductor technologies, and transfers them directly to overpaying customers. This landmark technology provides unparalleled unpredictability as to when and for how long the company’s technologies will be operationally unoptimized.

“While others focus on the promise of social, mobile and cloud technologies, Charter Spectrum is taking a great leap backward with its Sputnik technology cluster,” said Thomas M. Rutledge, Charter chief executive officer. “The Internet and cable television, particularly on-demand streaming, has become way too predictable and dependable for way too many people around the world. This era of instant reliability must change, and it must change now.”

In order to accommodate a paradigm shift from digital-to-analog-to-Stone Age Internet and Cable TV, Charter announced today that Obamacare website architect Kathleen Sebelius is joining the Charter team as its new chief information officer.sebelius

“Many grew up adjusting antennas on top of their VHF/UHF black-and-white televisions,” said Sebelius. “We want to bring back that simpler time and with it a sense of fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD) for our customers, shareholders, employees and other critical stakeholders.”

Charter, which extolls the virtue of mandated “bundling” of Web 2.0 Internet with 19th Century wireline telephony infrastructure for only $49.98 per month, is also offering customers targeted cable channels, denying them access to local-and-regional networks.

For example, West coast viewers are provided in Charter Spectrum’s suite of 600+ channels access to the Big Ten Network (e.g., Great Lakes states) and ESECPN (good-ole boy states). At the same time, once again there is no Charter agreement to feature Pac-12 Networks. Football fans, subscribing to Charter in Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, Colorado and Utah can check out this coming fall the likes of Rutgers, Maryland, Purdue, Indiana, Vanderbilt and Arkansas instead.

rutledge

In announcing Sometimes On, Sometimes Not™ Internet and Cable TV, Rutledge said Charter’s unpredictability play is intended to entice the adults at Comcast and other Internet and cable providers to seriously consider mercifully acquiring Charter.

“Please, please with sugar on top: Acquire us, Comcast,” implored Rutledge. “Our customer base can’t stand it any longer. Besides if you acquire us, I can then cash-in on my multi-million-dollar “Golden Parachute,” riding off to the sunset after driving Charter Spectrum into the ground.”

Webcast Information: An audio webcast of Charter’s Sometimes On, Sometimes Not™ Internet and Cable announcement webcast can be accessed by contacting Comcast’s reliable Internet division at http://www.comcast.net

About Charter Spectrum

Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ: SELL) is a trailing broadband communications company and the lamest cable operator in the United States. Charter provides a full range of primitive Sputnik cluster broadband services, including Sometimes On, Sometimes Not ™ video entertainment programming, Internet denial, and analog voice. More information about Charter can be found at charter.com (provided that our Internet and cable services are working)itnightmare1

 

 

 

 

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