Tag Archive: Same Sex Marriage


“A slave stood behind the conqueror holding a golden crown and whispering in his ear a warning: that all glory is fleeting.” – General George S. Patton

A happy problem, but still a dilemma, for organizations/movements/great leaders, who have just achieved long-sought landmark accomplishments, is: What will you do for an encore?

For championship college and professional sports teams the answer is relatively easy to state, harder to achieve: repeat. The Chicago Blackhawks are tasked with skating the Stanley Cup for the fourth time in seven seasons next spring. The Golden State Warriors are faced with the challenge of winning back-to-back NBA titles, something that has never occurred in the franchise’s mostly desultory history.

[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] Gay-rights activists gathered outside of the Supreme Court on the morning when the Court handed down its decision to overturn the Defense of Marriage Act.

[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] Gay-rights activists gathered outside of the Supreme Court on the morning when the Court handed down its decision to overturn the Defense of Marriage Act.

For the same-sex marriage movement the June 26 Supreme Court ruling, legalizing the right of gay people to marry, was made by a razor-thin 5-4 Obergefell v. Hodges decision. The impact nonetheless was 50-0 as every state is immediately and permanently required to permit the performing of same-sex unions, and to recognize their legality regardless of where or how (e.g., civil, religious) they occur.

The next question, which has already been posed by The New York Times and others, for the successful civil rights campaign, is what comes next? The answer will come in the form of celebrating a great political and society victory (e.g., Pride Parades). Eventually, the cheering will subside and the reality of everyday life and the challenge of American politics returns. Now what? Certainly, there is the continued necessity of protecting hard-earned rights and preventing discrimination, and that makes sense; still the question must be posed:

What comes next?

This is an easy question to pose, much more difficult to answer … and with it, the dilemma that has vexed organizations, movements and great characters throughout the course of history.

“One Small Step for Man; One Giant Leap for Mankind”

Let’s face it: NASA has not been the same since 1969.armstrongmoon

Neil Armstrong defied death, and made it to-and-from the moon with far less computing power than can be found in a modern-day smart phone. The first man on the moon had his ticker tape parade upon returning to Mother Earth. His place in the history books is cemented. Undoubtedly, his obits had already been written by the day the Grim Reaper came-a-calling in 2012.

In the face of competing budgetary demands and $18 trillion in record red ink and counting at $3.3 billion per day at the federal level, NASA has become just another agency with a huge public relations problem as it must justify its existence in the absence of any realistic plans to put humans on other planets anytime soon.

The current edition of National Geographic has a cover story about NASA, the New Horizons spacecraft, and hopefully the first ever photos of Pluto, expected on July 14. Checking out the last planet of the solar system is cool, but Armstrong walking on the moon was legendary.

Gone are the days of John F. Kennedy and the Cold War competition and the call to put a man on the moon by the end of the 1960s. Yes, we won that technology contest against the Soviet Union, and just 22 years after Armstrong walked on the moon, the USSR collapsed. Russia has hardly bothered us since then.

Not as momentous as the Supreme Court’s landmark decision on same-sex marriage or Neil Armstrong walking on the moon was an accomplishment dear to the heat of the author of Almost DailyBrett: The opening of the long closed Japan market to foreign designed-and-manufactured semiconductors, including those originating from Silicon Valley.siliconwafer

In my tenure as the director of communications for the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) and later as the director of corporate public relations for LSI Logic, yours truly worked for three years on this contentious issue.

At one time, Japan was in its ascendancy having driven Intel Corporation out of the DRAM (dynamic random access memory) market, a technology Intel actually invented. The U.S. semiconductor industry was being ushered into oblivion in the 1980s by Japan Inc.’s “Business is War” practices, the same fate that fell upon America’s pioneering color-TV industry.

The SIA and its members worked with Washington D.C. to stop predatory pricing or dumping of Japanese chips below cost, and finally pried open the Japanese market in 1996. The opening of  Japan and the decades-long recession eased the Japanese competitive threat. The U.S. industry achieved a great victory, but then … you guessed it … the question ensued: What was next for the SIA and its members?

Just like NASA, the SIA has tried one gambit after another to recapture its sense of purpose. The problem is that without an overriding issue (e.g., man on the moon, opening the Japan market), organizations and even individuals (e.g., General Patton when World War II ended) in many cases are never the same again.pattonscott

The war has been won. The cheering has subsided. The reality of what have you done lately ensues. An organization’s, movement’s, leader’s raison d’etre is no longer certain. A new public relations challenge comes to the forefront with no easy answers.

Some organizations, movements and leaders have successfully met the challenge of victory, while others face internal dissension as they struggle to come up with an answer to precisely what they should do for Act II.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/gay-marriage-and-other-major-rulings-at-the-supreme-court/2015/06/25/ef75a120-1b6d-11e5-bd7f-4611a60dd8e5_story.html?wpisrc=nl_evening&wpmm=1

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/28/us/gay-rights-leaders-push-for-federal-civil-rights-protections.html?smprod=nytcore-ipad&smid=nytcore-ipad-share&_r=0

http://www.biography.com/people/neil-armstrong-9188943

http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/632929-for-over-a-thousand-years-roman-conquerors-returning-from-the

 

 

 

“They were on Geritol. Injecting and mainlining Geritol. I mean they were some old farts.” – Singer Robert Plant reflecting back on a Rolling Stone negative review of Led Zeppelin’s first album

“I was wondering why the door closed on me.” – Actor Pierce Brosnan on being axed as 007 James Bond for the “New Bond,” Daniel Craig

geritol

Welcome to the Who Would Have Thunk It Department…

… An African-American man was elected and re-elected as president of the United States. His opponent and respective party standard bearer is a Mormon. Somewhere in heaven Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is smiling.

… Gay marriage will soon be legal nationwide. Write it down. It is only a matter of time. Let the big court rule and let’s move on (lower-case spelling).

… Be careful not to step on the shattered pieces of the glass ceiling as women are serving or have served as corporate chieftains, the prime minster of England, the chancellor of das Vaterland and at some point (it’s inevitable) the leader of the free world.

These statements do not suggest in the slightest that racism, sexism and negative slurs about one’s sexuality do not and will not continue to exist. Check out the viral video of fired Rutgers Coach Mike Rice.

At the same time, there is absolutely no doubt that we have come far as a society when it comes to leveling the playing field for racial and ethnic minorities, women and alternative lifestyles…but what about those north of 50?

Walking into a meeting room to speak to about 20 PR professionals last month in Sacramento, they expressed surprise that someone approaching his 60th birthday was coming to speak to them about why social media is not monolithic, how digital is eternal, and how to develop effective search engine marketing (SEM) campaigns.

What seemed unusual to them was that I was not sporting tattoos or any unconventional piercings. Where was my skateboard? Only Millennials and maybe, X-Gens, know social media. They are the ones that are listed “innovators” or at worst, “early majority,” when it comes to the Diffusion of Innovation Theory curve. Baby Boomers (who need not apply) are considered to be “late majority” or even “laggards” when it comes to digital self-publishing. Based upon their birth dates, it just has to be that way.

And yet, I teach social media to college students. My Y-Gen students ask about my Almost DailyBrett blog and how to use tags, other social media sites and online groups to spur SEO. If you need to ask for a translation of the acronym…you are too old (Just kidding, kind of…)

Whenever I fill out an “optional” demographic survey, particularly from a taxpayer-supported entity, non-profit or technology organization, I sense that I am committing professional Hari-Kari. Just insert that pen right into my stomach…and feel what is left of my career ooze out onto the floor.

First question: Male or female? The last I looked…hold it (checking)…yes, male. Strike one.

Second question: Hispanic or non-Hispanic white? Que’? Non-Hispanic white. Strike two.

Third question: Veteran or non-Veteran? Sorry to say, non-Veteran. Strike three.

Legally, they can’t ask for your age, but if they could? … Should I hide the date when I graduated with my Bachelor of Arts degree in Broadcasting Journalism from USC?  Not a bad idea.

The other day, I was discussing a potential contractor opportunity with a Silicon Valley software startup to assist with Search Engine Marketing (SEM), and applying my dozens of research hours into social media to help the firm break out of the pack, secure greater VC dollars and succeed on its own or be acquired by a larger company (Exit Strategies).

Better yet, I live in Eugene, Oregon and naturally do not charge Silicon Valley consulting rates (way north of $100 per hour).

Alas it was not to be. I was diplomatically told that unofficial company policy (and it has to be that way) is they won’t hire anyone else north of 45 years young.

Yes, yes…I know there are laws against age discrimination…try proving that in a 7.7 percent (official) unemployment rate backdrop. Does one want to be known as a whiner? Do you want the world to know that you just sued your last employer?

Every Baby Boomer PR/Marketing/Investor Relations type that proclaims to me that he or she does not “get” social media has one thing in common: They are all unemployed.

Social media may have its ebbs and flows (e.g., goodbye Myspace; whatever happened to Google+?; Is Pinterest fading?), but there is no doubt that digital self-publishing is ubiquitous and permanent. The landscape has shifted to true two-way symmetrical communications.

Having said that, the playing field is not level. When it comes to social media pros north of 50, there is a question about whether they will be allowed to even get on the field…any field, level or not.

Instead of exclusively focusing on extracting even more taxpayer dollars from the government, maybe the AARP and other seasoned-citizen NGOs should devote some of their energies to the new Civil Rights cause of our times: Giving qualified people more than 50 a truly fighting chance to apply their knowledge, talent and tons of energy to solving the issues and problems that come with our increasingly advanced, warp-speed digital society.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geritol

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/entertainment/2010/02/pierce-brosnan-still-wants-to-be-james-bond/

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20061103112837AA9OqUd

http://www.hollywood.com/news/brief/2420257/news-oct-15-brosnan-says-he-was-fired-as-bond-celebs-urge-people-to-vote-prince-s-new-video-labeled-racist-more?page=all

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seppuku

%d bloggers like this: