Tag Archive: SEC


(Washington Coach Chris Petersen) “should be thanking ESPN for actually having a relationship.” – MSESPN’s Kirk Herbstreit.

Really Kirk? You just personified the word, “arrogant.”

How dare Coach Petersen or any other mortal speak out against Made for Sports Networks/ Night Owl football games.

The Pac-12 and its $3 billion network masters have come up with this season’s not-so-subtle marketing spin: “Pac-12 After Dark.” The purpose is to provide Atlantic Seaboard and Midwest late-night programming for MSESPN and Fox Sports.

Better than infomercials, right?

What’s next for the conference: “Pac-12 After Midnight or Midnight Football Madness”?

Naturally, the three time-zone separation of the Left Coast and two hours for the forgotten time zone (e.g., Mountain) are a pure fact of geography. No argument. But does mean the Pac-12 should kiss the rings of the network masters?

More to the point, the late-night Pac-12 kickoffs make it oh-so-easy for the Football Pharisees on in God’s Time Zone (e.g., Eastern) to only focus on their anointed conferences: ACC, Big 10, Big 12 and of course, the ESECPN.

The Pac-12 champion has already been ruled out of the playoffs. Thank you Heather Dinich.

The Big Five Conferences are in reality in the Big Four Conferences.

Whattyathink Big 10 Joey Galloway and Herbstreit? Concur SEC Jesse Palmer and Rece Davis?

These nocturnal kickoff times (e.g., 10:45 pm EDT/7:45 pm PDT for last night’s USC vs. Arizona game) are rendering the “Conference of Champions” as virtually irrelevant when it comes to the College Football Playoff, but these games do provide entertainment before last call is proclaimed.

When will the Pac-12 Conference championship be decided? The answer is December 1 at 8pm  EST/5 pm PST in traffic gridlocked Santa Clara, CA on a Friday night.

And when will the other major conference games be played?

All of them are on Saturday, December 2: ACC in Charlotte, Big 10 in Indianapolis, Big 12 in Arlington, and SEC in Atlanta. The Pac-12 champion will be yesterday’s news … literally.

Thank you so much Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott for selling out the conference to the lowest bidder.

Grooving to Big 10 and SEC Networks in Pac-12 Territory

The author of Almost DailyBrett resides in one of the six Pac-12 states, so does that mean I can watch Pac-12 Networks?

If you subscribe to Charter Cable or Direct TV, the unfortunate answer is you can binge watch the SEC and Big 10 networks on the left coast, but not Pac-12 Networks. Reportedly, the conference has been in “negotiations” with these two providers for four-plus years.

What good is it to live in a Pac-12 state and watch Southern Eastern Conference and Big-10 sports? If a conference network is not available to its suffering fans, does the network make any sound?

And when our games are actually selected for broadcast for the major networks, you get to wait for the real major conferences to play their games before our nocturnal kickoffs.

Where Are the Pac-12 University Presidents?

Larry Scott was hired to shake up the sleepy Pac-12 commissioner’s office.

To his credit, he brought in the all-important Salt Lake City and Denver media markets with the accession of Utah and Colorado to the Pac-12. At this point the move appears to have benefited the two Mountain Zone schools with meager benefit to the rest of the conference.

The aforementioned Pac-12 Network is giving MSESPN and Fox Sports more reasons to avoid the conference teams with the possible exception of big market, USC.

The questions remain: Where are the Pac-12 university presidents?

Do they care more about television contracts than their students, alumni, student-athletes and fans?

Do they not comprehend the safety issues for thousands of people who are driving in the wee-morning hours after literally hours of libations and football?

There was a day in which Pac-12 games were played at civilized times including 12:30 pm, 1 pm, 3:30 pm and 5 pm, which allows them to be in the half-time discussions on the east coast.

Why can’t the university presidents deem that conference games will start no later than 6 pm PDT/PST and 7 pm (Arizona time in regards to the early fall heat)?

And while they are weighing whether selling out to the networks is a more pressing necessity than the basic mission of the university: educating students for the data-driven careers of tomorrow, they may also want to collectively ask the following Texas-ism:

Is Larry Scott all hat and no cattle?

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/865692254/Commissioner-Dont-expect-Pac-12-after-dark-to-go-away-anytime-soon.html

http://www.oregonlive.com/collegefootball/index.ssf/2015/10/monday_morning_news_notes_link_24.html

http://www.bendbulletin.com/sports/5662001-151/pac-12-after-dark-debate-lives-on

https://pac-12.com/networks

 

Should the school

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“After taking your PR classes for the past three years, I feel confident to go out into the world of PR communications professionals. I will miss your enthusiasm in the classroom every day, and writing your two-page executive memos! I can’t thank you enough.” – Graduating Central Washington University Public Relations Student

“I have learned more from your classes than all the other classes I’ve taken combined, and that’s not just including lessons having to do with school. You taught me to take pride in my work, and to put in the effort to do my best. I honestly do not know if I would be where I am today, or have the future that I see myself having if it weren’t for you.” – Another Graduating Central Washington University Public Relations Student

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Trust me when I say not all student reviews are so positive.

When they are, you treasure each and every one.

Most of all you don’t take them for granted because there is always another opinion.

What we call the “Rule of One.” There is always at least one student, who quite frankly hates your guts and even loathes the very ground you walk on. Sigh.

And then there is the student, who can quote back what you said.

In this world of texting, Snapchatting, mobile devices and old-fashioned laptops, breaking through and instilling even ein bisschen wisdom seems almost miraculous.

A professor can prepare. She or he can spend hours researching. And devote even more time to tinkering with PowerPoints and video. Finally, the time comes to deliver the lecture, coax questions and then ask two key rhetorical questions:

  1. Was anyone listening?
  2. Does anyone care what you have to say?

One of my students provided me with a thank you card with valuable “Kevin Quotes” including a smiley face.graduation2016

Here they are with an Almost DailyBrett commentary under each one. They are offered in the exact order chosen by the student writer:

  • “Buy on rumor; sell on news” Almost DailyBrett: This ubiquitous expression in the late 1990s directly led to the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) promulgating Reg. FD (Fair Disclosure). Corporate chieftains could no longer “whisper” meaningful tidbits to favored financial analysts (e.g., Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Fidelity, Morgan Stanley) allowing their clients to buy on the whispered rumor and then sell on the actual news.
  • “Your Brand Is In Play 24/7/365” Almost DailyBrett: Donald Trump in particular should pay close attention to this axiom. With instantaneous global communication through a few key strokes, digital communication can advance a personal or corporate with lightning speed, and destroy it just as quick.
  • “Digital Is Eternal” Almost DailyBrett: The complement to your brand being in play 24/7/365 is that all digital communications are permanent, enduring and can be resurrected by hiring managers, plaintiff attorneys and others who can hurt your reputation and/or career.justinesacco
  • “The Long and Short Program” Almost DailyBrett: The Olympics figure skating competition metaphor pertains to 10-K annual report letters and 10-Q quarterly earnings reports respectively. The former has more flexibility, while the latter must give precedence to GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) and include revenues, gross margin percentage, net income, EPS, cash-on-hand and dividends (if applicable).
  • “Don’t Be a Google Glasshole” Almost DailyBrett: Guess, I really did say that …
  • “Buy Low; Sell High” Almost DailyBrett. Every one of our corporate communications/investor relations classes began with this chant. One must understand profit margins.
  • “Do Not Buy Stock in Enron” Almost DailyBrett: Don’t buy a stock just because it is going up. You need to understand a company’s raison d’ etat before you commit funds. There is a real difference between investing and gambling. Those who gambled on Enron lost everything.
  • “How Does a Company Make Money?” Almost DailyBrett: Bethany McLean of Fortune asked this basic question to Jeffrey Skilling, now imprisoned former Enron president. The Harvard-trained chief executive needed an accountant to answer this most basic of questions. McLean smelled a rat.
  • “Stocks Are Forward-Looking Indicators” Almost DailyBrett: As Wall Street wild man Jim Cramer of CNBC Mad Money fame always states” “I don’t care about a stock’s past, only its future.”edwards1
  • “Tell the Truth, Tell It All, Tell It Fast. Move On” Almost DailyBrett: These 11 words are the crux of effective crisis communications. Disclosure is inevitable. You can manage or be managed. Former presidential candidate John Edwards is the poster child for failing to follow this advice.
  • “Corporate America Needs Better PR” Almost DailyBrett: Amen

Appreciate the nice words. Even more: Thanks for listening and learning.

https://www.snapchat.com/

https://www.sec.gov/answers/regfd.htm

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2015/04/08/the-internet-where-fools-go-to-feel-important/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2015/05/25/the-mother-of-all-weak-arguments/

 

 

“The games they remember are played in November …”

… unless these games are played in the greatest conference of them all, ESECPN.cupcakesaturday

Take a gander at the full slate of ESECPN cupcake games on Saturday November 21 or one week before the end of the regular season:

☻Charleston Southern is visiting the Top-10 ranked Alabama Crimson Tide in Bryant-Denny Stadium. “Bless their hearts.”

☻Idaho and Auburn are renewing their storied intersectional rivalry at Jordan-Hare Stadium. Auburn leads the series, 1-0.

☻Florida Atlantic is making a trip to the “Swamp” for its third cross-state confrontation with #11 Florida. Florida will be playing the Florida Atlantic Owls for the third time. The first two resulted in (gasp), Gator victories by an average margin of 59-20.

☻The same is true for Georgia Southern going in-between the hedges to take on the Georgia Bulldogs. Georgia leads the series 5-0. Can a sixth consecutive victory be in the offing?

☻The Citadel is making the trip to Columbia to play the South Carolina Gamecocks. The Citadel Bulldogs are 7-40-3 all-time against South Carolina. The last time the Gamecocks played a game at the Citadel?

Lyndon Johnson was president.

☻And let’s not forget the first-ever meeting between the UNC Charlotte 49ers and the Kentucky Wildcats in Lexington. This would be a much better basketball game.cupcakesaturday2

Why does the ESECPN conference play all these “cupcakes” this late in the season? Do we really think that Charleston Southern Buccaneers out of the Big South Conference has a snowball’s chance against Alabama, #7 ranked team in the nation in Tuscaloosa?

Looking forward to the second-ever meeting between the Auburn Tigers and the Idaho Vandals, Saturday Down South commented: “Auburn squeaked by with a 30-23 win in the Tigers’ only previous meeting with the Vandals. This game is strategically placed on the schedule to give Auburn an extra week of rest and preparation for the Iron Bowl. It should be an easier win this time around.”

Why are these ESECPN games being played, particularly so late in the season? There are several reasons:

  1. The ESECPN conference categorically refuses to increase the number of conference games from eight-to-nine each season. This shameful decision translates into one less time each season the ESECPN teams put in jeopardy their respective won-loss records compared to other conferences (e.g., Pac-12).
  2. Most college football teams adopt an A-B-C system of scheduling with one really tough non-conference game, one medium difficulty game and one cupcake. The cupcake game is typically played before the conference season starts and serves as a glorified scrimmage in preparation for the conference slate.
  3. As Saturday Down South commented Alabama playing Charleston Southern and Auburn taking on Idaho on November 21, essentially gives both teams a “bye” the week before the Alabama vs. Auburn “Iron Bowl.”
  4. The same is true for ESECPN conference-wanna-be Florida State, which plays Chattanooga the same day that Florida is matched up against Florida Atlantic. The Seminoles and Gators are playing cupcakes before they take on each other.
  5. All of these ESECPN cupcake games are surprise, surprise — home contests — meaning a full-stadium (e.g., 101,821 in Tuscaloosa) of Kool-Aid drinkers. Do you really think Auburn would travel to Moscow, Idaho or Georgia would ever stoop to play at Georgia Southern? Alabama playing at Charleston Southern? You’re kidding. Right?

Any bridges you would like to buy?

To be fair to the ESECPN conference office in Bristol, Connecticut, not all conference teams will be playing cupcakes on November 21: Mississippi State travels to Arkansas; LSU plays at Ole Miss; Tennessee visits Missouri and Texas A&M heads to Vandy.

Compare this shameful practice with the Pac-12 conference in which every team plays nine conference games, which translates into zero late-season cupcakes. Let’s check out the Pac-12 lineup on November 21:

USC vs. Oregon

Cal vs. Stanford

Arizona vs. Arizona State

UCLA vs. Utah

Colorado vs. WSU

Washington vs. OSU

oregonusc

If you are scoring at home that means that 12 teams playing six Pac-12 conference games vs. six ESECPN teams playing cupcakes and eight teams playing four conference games.

Will the issues rightfully raised by Almost DailyBrett resonate at ESECPN? Don’t count on it, particularly when you consider the unholy big bucks alliance that brings us the SEC ESPN Network.

Whattyathink Rece Davis (Alabama)? How about it Jesse Palmer (Florida)? Are you concerned about the spectre of Cupcake Saturday David Pollack (Georgia)?

Silence.

http://www.saturdaydownsouth.com/alabama-football/all-time-alabama-record-against-2015-opponents/

http://www.saturdaydownsouth.com/auburn-football/all-time-auburn-record-against-its-2015-opponents/

http://www.winsipedia.com/florida/vs/florida-atlantic

http://secsports.go.com/watch

 

 

 

What are you going to do for programming one month from today on SEC Cupcake Saturday, November 22?

cupcakes

Will the 24/7/365 Southeastern Conference-loving network (that would be you, ESECPN) treat the nation to Alabama vs. the Western Carolina Catamounts?

Or is it, Carolina Western? Even Nick Saban and Alabama alum Rece Davis of ESECPN can’t talk up the “potential” of Western Carolina.

Or how about Auburn vs. Samford (& Son) Bulldogs?

Jesse Palmer’s Florida Gators will be playing the dreaded Eastern Kentucky Colonels that same day in “The Swamp.”

And David Pollack’s Georgia Bulldogs will be lining up in between the hedges against the Charleston Southern Buccaneers.

palmerpollack

Let’s not forget South Carolina vs. South Alabama Jaguars (Southern Mississippi would be a real opponent).

Reportedly, ESECPN Game Day will visit Nashville to get everyone stoked for Vanderbilt’s game that day against Vassar.

As they say: “You can’t stop the Vassar Brewers’ offense; you can only hope to contain it.”

Are these glorified late-season scrimmages the net result of the SEC refusing to play a nine-game conference schedule, and shamelessly loading up on body-bag games against sacrificial lambs?

Sure looks that way from this humble vantage point west of the Tennessee River.

Four Playoff Spots for Four ESECPN Teams?

Wouldn’t it be great for SEC’s cable sports network if the national championship was decided by a quartet of football factories located somewhere in the old Confederacy, south of the Mason-Dixon Line from Texas in the west to South Carolina in the east?

What if the South rises again, secedes from the union (and the NCAA), and makes the four-team All ESECPN playoff an annual event? No need to consider and follow the exploits of teams from the 14-team Big 10, the 10-team Big 12, the 12-team Pac-12 or any other sad-sack conference.

What is really unfortunate about SEC Cupcake Saturday is the loss of traditional rivalries that were played on the fourth Saturday in November. Included in these games on this hallowed date were the Iron Bowl between Alabama and Auburn and the Egg Bowl between Mississippi and Mississippi State. Instead, Alabama and Auburn are devouring cupcakes that day, basically scheduling a “bye” in drag before the Iron Bowl.

There is hope for college football fundamentalists November 22: You just have to venture west of the Hudson River to Pasadena, California. Yes, USC plays UCLA that day in the Rose Bowl in a real football game with genuine competition. By closing one’s eyes, you can see O.J. Simpson (without his knife) and Gary Beban dueling it out in the Crosstown Rivalry.

Up north that day will be Stanford vs. Cal in the latest renewal of the so-called “Big Game.” Who can forget the one “Play” against Stanford that serves as the single highlight of Cal’s 128-years of inglorious football?

Instead of feasting on cupcakes the week before their rivalry games, the remainder of the Pac-12 is playing conference games that day: Arizona vs. Utah; Colorado vs. Oregon; Oregon State vs. Washington and Washington State vs. Arizona State.

Playing Conference Games in November?

The apologists for the Southeastern Conference at the studios of ESECPN will inevitably point to the fact that other teams in other conferences play their own cupcake opponents. The charge is valid, but these games come at the beginning of the campaign, not the week before the traditional season-ending rivalry game.

They will also cite that Arkansas plays Ole Miss on November 22; Ditto for Mississippi State vs. Vandy and Missouri vs. Tennessee … or six teams out of 14 are actually playing conference games in week four of November. Shameful.

Here is a unique idea for the folks at ESECPN in Bristol, Connecticut: Why not demand the Southeastern Conference play a nine-game conference schedule, putting an end once-and-for-all: Cupcake Saturday?

Let’s make it easy or simple enough for the occupants of the SEC’s headquarters in Birmingham, Alabama: Conference games and only conference games are played in November with the obvious exceptions of Florida vs. Florida State, Georgia vs. Georgia Tech and Kentucky vs. Louisville.

Whattyathink Jesse Palmer?

Any thoughts David Pollack?

How about it, Rece Davis?

Can you live without Florida playing a “home game” against Eastern Kentucky (e.g., the Gators would never step foot in Richmond, Kentucky let alone find it on the map) or Georgia taking on Charleston Southern in a glorified high school stadium?.charleston

Based upon a quick review of the secondary ticket market even with the football crazies south of the Mason-Dixon Line, the fans agree. Tickets for Alabama’s certain annihilation of Western Carolina on November 22 start at $119. Tix for the Iron Bowl the following week start at $297 and peak at $5,855 per ticket.

Which game would you rather watch? Hey ESECPN, let’s dispense with the cupcakes and go for good old-fashioned raw meat instead.

http://www.wcu.edu/

http://www.samford.edu/

http://www.eku.edu/

http://www.csuniv.edu/

http://www.southalabama.edu/

http://www.vassar.edu/

http://secsports.go.com/watch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snap. Crackle. Pop.

Silicon Valley and other mass communicators are enamored when it comes to threes.

CNBC’s investment guru Jim Cramer talks about the three moving forces in technology: Social, Mobile and Cloud.

socialmobilecloud

Threes are easy to remember, fours or fives, not so much.

At LSI Logic, we were fond of talking about our three C’s: Communications, Computer and Consumer.

These were our three strategic markets. The three C’s were easy for customers, employees and owners (e.g., investors) or the acronym, C.E.O., (another three) to remember.

In this spirit, let’s talk about the Almost DailyBrett Communication Big Three.

These are an absolutely essential trio of communications skills, most in demand in the marketplace, and which need to be taught by our colleges and universities.

Drum roll: Persuasive Writing; Financial Communications; and Social Media.

Think of it this way: The first two are analog in nature and the latter is digital.

Compelling Writing Skills

Writing goes back to the first publicity campaign on behalf of the all-powerful Pharaoh, the Rosetta Stone. He was awesome, and if you need proof just check out the hieroglyphics on the smoothed surface.rosetta

Johannes Gutenberg speeded up the process with his Mainz, Germany printing press in the 14th Century, and now the acceleration is at warp speed with wireless communication devices.

Despite the unprecedented ability to communicate in nanoseconds to virtually any spot on the globe at any time, the old-fashioned skills of developing compelling, credible and accurate copy under deadline pressure has never been greater. For some, writing is a natural gift that comes easy. For others, it is a laborious process that can be perfected with practice.

Starting this fall, your Almost DailyBrett author is teaching Introduction to Public Relations Writing at Central Washington University. My 20 students are going to be asked to produce the following:

  • Curriculum Vitae or resume, emphasizing the student’s professional and academic accomplishments with quantifiable measurements
  • Twitter-style cover letter applying for an entry-level public relations position and emphasizing the student’s personal ROI or Return on Investment
  • Complete LinkedIn profile including the same elements of the resume, plus a professional mug shot, three references and at least 30 connections
  • News advisory targeting legacy and/or digital native media informing and/or inviting them to attend and cover an upcoming event
  • News release providing information about a breaking news story, employing the inverted pyramid and using the five W’s – What, When, Where, Who, Why – and the one H – How
  • Pitch to a selected reporter, editor, correspondent, blogger or news aggregator about a newsworthy story and offering assistance
  • Copy for a 30-second radio or television PSA or Public Service Announcement on behalf of a non-profit agency
  • Chief executive officer strategy letter to investors, analysts and employees outlining your selected company’s business strategy and future prospects
  • CSR or Corporate Social Responsibility letter to company employees about efforts your chosen corporation is making to safeguard employees, protect the environment and serve the communities in which the company does business
  • Crisis communications news release – written under deadline pressure – announcing steps a company has taken to address the crisis and pointing to the future
  • Four personal blog posts, emphasizing public relations skills and commenting on breaking news events
  • Two-page executive memo with bullets and subheads introducing a subject, examining the factors, and recommending a course of action

The philosophy behind these assignments is the only way to really become effective at persuasive writing is to Just Do It!

Financial Communications

Many right-brain types, the very people who opt for Journalism school, avoid figures at all costs. And yet, the numbers will find them.

We now live in a world of “big data,” particularly those companies that are publicly traded. Chairman Mao is probably rolling over in his grave as PRC-based Alibaba takes its predominate Mainland China digital retail play public this Friday with shares expected to be initially priced between $66 and $68.

alibaba

Right-brain students need to figure out how to make peace with numbers. UNC Professor Chris Roush (Show Me The Money) states ex-cathedra: “Behind every number is a story.”

Hmmm … that means there are stories to be told about these numbers. In addition, the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) requires these stories to be told to all investors, if they are “material.” Translated: If a company has “material” information that would prompt an investor to buy, sell or hold company stock, then the company is mandated to disclose under Regulation FD (Fair Disclosure).

What this means is that each and every of the more than 5,000 publicly traded companies (NYSE or NASDAQ) in this country must issue news releases. The writers are not expected to produce the figures (there are oodles of accountants, auditors, controllers …), but they instead must tell the story behind these numbers.

That means that college and university communications graduates should know the difference between the income statement top line (revenues), the bottom line (net income or net loss) and everything in between (e.g., COGS, Gross Margin, SG&A, R&D, Operating Income, Taxes, Amortized Expenses …).

Sure wish someone had been kind enough to teach me these skills, including how to read a balance sheet, back in college.

Social Media

The world has already shifted from Web 1.0 (accessing websites) to Web 2.0 (wired and wireless devices talking to each other) and soon Web 3.0 (semantic web).

The Economist reported this week that nearly one-quarter ($120 billion) of the world’s $500 billion advertising business is coming from digital ads, increasingly being delivered to mobile devices. Yes there is no doubt that digital media is being monetized through search engine optimization (SEO) and other techniques, and that Genie is not going back in the bottle.

Facebook (friends), Twitter (140-character tweets), LinkedIn (connections), YouTube (videos), Flickr (photos), Pinterest (online scrapbooks), WordPress (Almost DailyBrett) all enjoy first-mover advantages in their respective social media spaces. There are challengers now and more competitors to come. The bottom line is that digital publishing through binary code is here to stay.

Companies and international public relations agencies are expecting that digital natives instinctively understand social media. This all circles back to the ability to write clear, concise, credible and compelling copy for an audience that is increasingly overwhelmed by information.

digitalnatives

And much of this data comes in the way of numbers, the ones with a story behind them. And increasingly, these stories no longer involve a gate-keeper but are transmitted though “owned” media (e.g., websites, blogs, social media sites).

Stating that compelling writing, financial communications and social media are the Big Three of Communications may entice the crisis communications, marketing, branding, reputation management, employee communications, public affairs and other dedicated professionals to take umbrage.

Fret not. Almost DailyBrett loves you too, and says to each of you that you need (or soon will need) graduates who can tell the story, and tell it well, through effective writing, numerical literacy and of course, proficiency with digital tools.

http://smallbusiness.chron.com/importance-writing-skills-business-845.html

http://www.unc.edu/~croush/CV.htm

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2014/05/29/owned-media-an-answer-to-digital-change/

http://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21615869-technology-radically-changing-advertising-business-profound-consequences

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s ask the question another way: Should left-brain quantitative types be teaching communications to right-brain qualitative types or at least overseeing their academic progress?

Recently, the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) asked corporate executives if the Whartons, Haas’, Tucks, Kelloggs and oodles of other prestigious business schools should be teaching public relations to MBA candidates. The answer was overwhelming and loud and clear…”Yes!” wharton

Today, Almost DailyBrett is posing a different question:

Should the entire undergraduate and graduate sequences for the instruction of public relations and advertising (a logical extension) be taught by business schools?

This suggestion has been brought to my repeated attention by people who know both sides of the reporter/flack divide.

The thinking, which is credible, is that PR and advertising build, support and extend corporate brands. In most cases, brand is associated with a privately held or publicly traded company/corporation, directly flowing from a business strategy. Doesn’t it make sense for future PR and advertising professionals to be taught by MBAs and others holding advanced business degrees?

Strategic Business/Financial Communications

In creating an upper division college course as my master’s degree project, I was immediately struck by the opening of University of North Carolina Professor Chris Roush’s book, Show me the money: Writing business and economics stories for mass communication.

Roush recounted the story of the reporter interviewing the CEO of Humana Corporation. The CEO made several references to the regulatory SEC. The reporter asked: “Excuse me, but what does the Southeastern Conference have to do with your business?

How many students, majoring in public relations and advertising, do not know the difference between the Securities Exchange Commission and the Southeastern Conference?

showmethemoney How many more cannot explain the difference between revenues and net income?

Is gross margin increasing/decreasing or expanding/contracting?

And what constitutes accretive as opposed to dilutive when it comes to EPS?

Asking for a show of hands, there are always more than a few honest souls who openly admit they are majoring in public relations or advertising because they are not on friendly terms with numbers.

As a green public relations director back in the 1990s/2000s Silicon Valley, the author of Almost DailyBrett was asked to produce quarterly earnings releases (10-Q), the CEO letter for the annual report (10-K) and oodles of unplanned disclosures, including material  top-line or bottom-line misses, mergers and acquisitions and restructurings (8-K).

Help!

Why was I not taught how to read an income statement, a balance sheet, a cash-flow statement or how to track a stock back in college? The reason was simple: I went to journalism school.

The Five W’s, One H, The Inverted Pyramid and Who the Hell Cares?

Having acknowledged the lack of quantitative skills for the vast majority of journalism graduates, and this number definitely includes those majoring in public relations and advertising, there is still a compelling need for these students to learn journalism.

Some may differ because those who employ earned media (public relations) and paid media (advertising) are not objective. They have a point of view. PR and advertising pros want the public to do something that directly benefits their client or clients. True, enough.

Regardless, these practitioners still have an obligation to get the story right. They need to understand if a story is newsworthy or not for the intended audience(s). They need to pose the story in the inverted pyramid-style with the all-important what, when, where, who, why, how and who cares questions being answered in a concise and compelling manner.

invertedpyramid Are business schools equipped to teach journalism to PR and advertising majors? Do they want to teach journalism? Would they just outsource this responsibility to the journalism schools? They would still have ultimate oversight for these PR and advertising students.

Before these questions are all answered, let’s address another assumption, and a wrong contention as well. We are assuming that all public relations and advertising majors will be working for the greater glory and good of privately held (e.g., Dell, Subway) and publicly traded companies (e.g., Google, Amazon).

What about those who want to work in the public sector, politics, non-profits or NGOs? Yes, there are still bottom lines for all of these entities because they all have to stay in business. (Okay, the $18 trillion in cumulative debt federal government is an exception, but let’s avoid that subject for now).

Can business schools effectively teach issues management? Can they teach community relations? Can they really convey corporate social responsibility as opposed to fiduciary responsibility? Or will all of these subjects be taught by journalism schools? Do they want to teach these subjects and more? If not, why move public relations and advertising students to business schools?

The End of Journalism Schools?

If public relations and advertising students are transferred to business schools, what happens to journalism/communications schools?

First, the demographic makeup of business schools becomes more XX-chromosomes by means of the influx or public relations and advertising students, and the percentage of XY-chromosome journalism student bodies increases. Whether these results are demographically important or not, Almost DailyBrett will leave that analysis to those with higher pay grades.

Second, one must ask whether the tasks for already hard-pressed journalism school development (e.g., fundraising) professionals will become next to impossible if they lose students and graduates from two highly compensated professions?

Third, university and college politics are thorny enough without posing this transfer public relations/advertising students from J-schools to Biz schools. Is this a fight that anyone really wants to undertake? Would one jump into a venomous snake pit, if it was not necessary?

Maybe the answer lies with a hybrid approach? Keep public relations and advertising students under the J-school/Communications-school tent, but require them to take essential strategic business classes, particularly those that focus on brand management, reading income statements and balance sheets.

In return, business students should learn effective writing, grammar and persuasion skills offered by J-schools. The result may be more students, hailing from business and journalism schools, who are qualitatively and quantitatively equipped to serve as corporate public relations and investor relations technicians, managers, directors or vice presidents.

Heck, they will at least know the difference between the top-line and the bottom-line.

One can always dream. Right?

http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/mba-admissions-strictly-business/2011/12/16/why-b-schools-need-to-teach-pr

http://www.socialbusinessnews.com/should-public-relations-be-taught-in-business-school/

http://www.businessweek.com/business-schools/public-relations-coming-to-a-bschool-near-you-12072011.html

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2014/02/18/are-public-relations-pros-journalists/

NASDAQ: WEED?

“Marijuana may not be addictive, but money certainly is.” – University of Denver law professor Sam Kamin

ben

How long will it be before publicly traded marijuana-producer/seller companies are listed on the NYSE or NASDAQ?

Will pot company execs someday be ringing the bell and/or pounding the gavel on Wall Street?

Will they be issuing SEC-mandated 10-Q quarterly earnings releases (how high can this stock go?), uploading 10-K annual reports, producing material 8-K filings about mergers, acquisitions and restructurings and holding shareholder meetings?

Will there be handouts for investors?

Preposterous you say? Maybe not.

“…Advocates have waged savvy campaigns…presenting a clean-cut, besuited image worlds away from the tie-dyed stereotype.” – The Economist, “High Time.”

The argument has been made for Amendment 64 (e.g., Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act) in Colorado. Washington and other states that marijuana should be legalized, taxed and regulated.

Does that eventually include the SEC, the Securities Exchange Commission?

How about the FTC, Federal Trade Commission? And maybe even the Financial Standards Accounting Board, FASB. Will publicly traded marijuana companies report quarterly earnings using both GAAP and Pro Forma accounting?

If there are sky-high profits to be made as a result of legalization, taxation and regulation of marijuana, shouldn’t the Military-Industrial Complex crowd get its cut on the action?

marjijuana

If the trend continues toward nationwide marijuana legalization,(federal DOJ is not enforcing in states that vote for medicinal marijuana and other uses), logic dictates that after a few years in “test” markets such as Colorado and Washington, eventually companies may acquire these firms and add marijuana to their product portfolios.

Some may even decide to directly enter the production/marketing of marijuana sector, dominate market share and eventually spin out a marijuana division as a highly covered IPO.

Ready for NASDAQ: WEED?

What does this big profits specter mean to the backyard grower, who is looking to raise a few extra bucks? Has this person ever heard of the term, “economies of scale?” Once a Philip Morris … err … Altria Group, Inc. gets into the market with its legendary ability to produce and sell in massive volume could easily result in the dreams of these small growers going up in smoke.

Think of it this way, a company that markets cancer-causing Marlboros or essentially the burning and smoking of highly addictive doctored tobacco leaves is not going to have any moral qualms about the burning and smoking of pot leaves, particularly if there is a huge profit margin attached to these sales.

CNBC’s “Mad Money” Jim Cramer was posing the hypothetical question as to whether investors should add addictive “sin” stocks to their individual portfolios in 2014. Naturally, Altria Group or NYSE: MO was on the list. There was also Diageo plc (NYSE: DEO) that markets high-end whiskies, vodkas and liquors. Ditto for Wynn Resorts Ltd. (NASDAQ: WYNN) that operates gambling resorts. Could these sinful companies be persuaded to dip into the marijuana market once the legalize-tax-regulate advocates have won the day?

Is the Pope, Catholic?

There may also be a genetically modified marijuana play for Monsanto (NYSE: MON) and a counter wholesome organic effort by Whole Foods Market (NASDAQ: WFM).  Think of the marketing and branding possibilities and the competing television ads during future Super Bowls. Move over erectile dysfunction.

Marijuana is not only consumed in smoked form, but in brownies and other pastries. There may be a great opportunity for General Mills (NYSE: GIS) that serves as the custodian of the Betty Crocker brand. Will this be the time to expand the reach of the company’s markets and upgrade the brand at the same time?

Marijuana brownies would completely change the way we think of the image of Betty Crocker with her apron.

Just as the fictional Nick Naylor from Thank You for Smoking embodies the image of the fast talking PR pro for the tobacco industry, will there be female and male counterparts for publicly traded marijuana companies? The legalize-tax-regulate crowd has already proven they can win the day, at least in some states, when it comes to marijuana. Surely future Nick Naylors can artfully defend the rising top and bottom lines and expanding gross margins of marijuana companies.

NickNaylor

Tobacco, booze, gambling and other perceived sinful companies have not only survived, heck some are very profitable with decent reputations and brands. Couldn’t the same be true for publicly traded and SEC regulated marijuana companies?

There is money to be made on Wall Street. Why shouldn’t SEC regulated publicly traded marijuana companies make big-time profits emanating from a newly legalized, taxed and regulated market?

http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21593467-colorado-embarks-unprecedented-experiment-high-time

http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2014/01/economist-explains-1

http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21573135-americas-first-market-recreational-marijuana-will-be-far-free-tax-and-tax-again

http://www.stockpickr.com/rhinostocks/portfolio/sin-stocks-january-2014/

http://seekingalpha.com/article/1156521-5-marijuana-stocks-going-crazy-and-this-could-be-just-the-beginning

http://time.com/4044698/willie-nelson-pot-brand/

 

The Wolf of Wall Street now holds the cinematic record for the most uses of the F-bomb in a non-documentary film.

Congratulations?

How long will it be before some other director beats Martin Scorsese’s “record” for the use of the world’s most prevalent four-letter word?

scorsesedicaprio

Do we really give a f… about this word anymore?

Little did I realize that yours truly along with his new bride and one and only biological daughter witnessed history being made with 506 F-bombs on Xmas Day. Kind of makes you feel all tingly for the Holidays.

Reportedly, Scorsese had to exercise restraint in the use of sequences of strong sexual content, graphic nudity, drug use and language throughout, and for some violence in order to avoid the dreaded NC-17 rating.

Whew! That was close.

So why did I indulge in this three-hour film, and drag along my loved ones (and apologize afterwards) on Christmas Day? Good question.

The first is that I am a Wall Street junkie (equities and mutual funds; not the cocaine and ludes that seem to pop up in between tons of flesh in this film). I have written and lectured repeatedly about the synergy between fiduciary responsibility and corporate social responsibility, IPOs, SEC disclosure compliance and many other Wall Street-related strategic communications issues.

The film revolves around the book, The Wolf of Wall Street, about the Internet Bubble era of stock-pimpster (e.g., Steve Madden IPO), fraud-master, money-laundering, Jordan Belfort, and his stock brokerage, Stratton Oakmont.

In the end, Belfort ignored all the warning signs and a possible settlement with the SEC, broke a plea bargain with the FBI, and ended up in a federal pen in Nevada and paid $110.4 million in fines. Today, he is a motivational speaker.

Couldn’t Scorsese have told us this story without pouring-it-on in the form of yet another clip of drug ingestion and gratuitous nudity? Leaving the theatre, I was wondering whether The Wolf of Wall Street was a good film or a bad film. I knew that it could have been better, particularly with Leonardo DiCaprio, Rob Reiner and Margot Robbie lending their names and talents to the movie.

leonardomargot

Please don’t discount my comments by concluding that the author of Almost DailyBrett is a prude. After all, the blog earlier bared its soul commenting on the Playboy pose or no-pose decision from a reputation management point of view. My conclusion? It all depends.

Almost DailyBrett earlier examined Bill Maher’s lovely use of the vulgar C-word to describe former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin, and the New York Times’ decision to use the F-word in a recent news story.

All of these examples, and Scorsese’s new film, bring up the question of the coarsening of society. Have we become immune to profane language? Will the F-word eventually serve as an adjective modifying every noun? Will we get to the point that the F-bomb is reduced to a cliché?

Should we thank Hollywood for our present cultural state of affairs?

What is the Almost DailyBrett take on the obsessive use of the F-bomb to the point it is almost di rigueur in our society?

There is no doubt that Jordan Belfort would never be confused with Mother Teresa. He obviously used the F-word, and was addicted to/obsessed with drugs, sex and money. Can that point be made without dropping 506 F-bombs in 179 minutes or an average of 2.8268156424 uses of the F-word each minute or one every 20 seconds?

One would hope so.

My former boss, Governor George Deukmejian, remembered fondly debating Democratic leader and future San Francisco Mayor George Moscone on the floor of the California State Senate. Being the minority leader, George Deukmejian, was on the wrong end of the final vote more times than naught. Still when the debate was over, the two Georges were friends and no F-bombs were dropped.

hamiltonburrduel

Contentiousness is not new to our society and undoubtedly will persist. Consider the fatal duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. How about the Free States and the Slave States that led to the Civil War? Next year we will commemorate the start of The War to End All Wars. Everyone has got along swimmingly since the end of World War I in 1918.

Besides leaving massive debts to our children and their children, will we as the fading Baby Boomer Generation bequest to them a coarse-and-vile society? Is there a way that we can put the brakes on, at least slowing down, the animosity, vitriol and the degradation of societal discourse?

At a minimum, let’s hope we don’t see a Christmas movie with 507 F-bombs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jordan_Belfort

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wolf_of_Wall_Street_%282013_film%29

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1719590/wolf-of-wall-street-margot-robbie-nudity.jhtml

http://thecelebritycafe.com/reviews/2013/12/martin-scorseses-wolf-wall-street-review-excessive-movie-about-excess

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2013/08/29/the-f-bomb-r-i-p/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2012/03/24/is-the-c-word-the-equivalent-of-the-n-word/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2012/01/10/the-decision-to-pose-for-playboy/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2011/12/13/fiduciary-responsibility-vs-corporate-social-responsibility/

Soft Oregon?

Oregon Ducks fans are more rabid because there is nothing else to do in the state except watch ‘Portlandia.’” – author and New York City native, Buzz Bissinger.

Oregon is putrid against nationally ranked opponents. All the Ducks really do is feast on the poor, and suck it up against the rich.” – Harry Gerard “H.G.” Bissinger, III.

rosebowl

Leave it to the author of Friday Night Lights to mess up a magazine with heroin-chic Kate Moss on the cover.

Bissinger wants to bring back more concussions, blood and broken bones to college and professional football.

Yep, Buzz gave it to the Oregon Ducks from the comfort of his Manhattan digs in his From Butkus to Buttercup essay. BTW Bissinger III, OR-EE-GONE is located due west of the Hudson River…give or take two-or-three time zones to the west.

Maybe I shouldn’t be so rough on Buzz. After all, I thoroughly enjoyed the movie, Friday Night Lights, about Reagan-era football in West Texas.

And his reflection of the perception about Oregon football being soft is shared by others, particularly the talking heads on Bristol, Connecticut’s ES(SEC)PN.

Bissinger (not to be confused with Kissinger) offered that Baylor and Oregon have become “dirty words” in college football. Why?

Because they win?

Because they are both a blast to watch?

Substitute Oregon for Central Florida against Baylor in the Fiesta Bowl, and I guarantee you ES(SEC)PN ratings that will be higher than the astronomical figures on the scoreboard.

College football is immensely popular because of the breakneck speed in which it is now played. Huddles are so yesterday. Speed. Tempo, Excitement. New unis. New ways of thinking.

Bissinger and the purists want to go back to Woody Hayes, Bo Schembechler and three-yards and a cloud of dust. There is just something magical about watching a team break the huddle. The quarterback putting his hands on the center’s derriere. And then (gasp) handing off the ball to the burly fullback for a dive play…Yawn.

woodybo

If you want that kind of game, just watch Stanford vs. Michigan State in the Rose Bowl. There will be big burly linemen, packed like sardines on the line of scrimmage in which everyone in the stadium and on television knows what play will be run. The game will be as predictable as a root canal.

“Former Oregon coach Chip Kelly either revolutionized the game with the hurry-up, no-huddle offense every play or hastened the game’s absurdity, since the team looks like an amphetamine-induced ‘Tom and Jerry’ cartoon in which the beleaguered cat and its nemesis mouse wear green Speedos.” – Bissinger III in From Butkus to Buttercup.

buzz

That would be the same Chip Kelly, who has already doubled the number of wins for the Philadelphia Eagles with two games to go. These are the same Philadelphia Eagles that went 4-12 in 2012 and are now leading the NFC East at 8-6 with a big Sunday night game against the Chicago Bears on the docket.

Getting back to the notion that Oregon blows away the weak and crumbles before the smash-mouth crowd may be de rigueur with the Eastern Time Zone folks, who can’t stay up late for Oregon’s games. There are a few facts that belie this perception…Yes, yes, there is the adage about perception trumping reality. Sorry “putrid” does not apply unless you are talking about SEC non-conference “competition.”

● Oregon plays in the Pac-12 Conference, which mandates each team to play nine conference games. The SEC only requires its teams to play eight conference foes…which leaves a spot open for another cupcake game.  Let’s see…on November 23, Alabama walloped Chattanooga and South Carolina beat up on Coastal Carolina. West Carolina was not available that day as they had already played Auburn.

● Speaking of the SEC, Oregon ran all over Tennessee and its smash-mouth offensive and defensive lines, 59-14 at Autzen Stadium. This is the very same Tennessee team that later upset Steve Spurrier’s South Carolina Gamecocks, 23-21.

● Oregon lost to Stanford this year and in 2012 in relatively close games. Keep in mind, Oregon blasted Stanford in Palo Alto, 53-30 in 2011, and 52-31 in Eugene in 2010, with Andrew Luck serving as Stanford’s quarterback.

● Finesse Oregon never wins the big games, particularly big physical teams. Really? Does the 2012 Rose Bowl 45-38 win against burly Wisconsin with Russell Wilson at QB and Montee Ball carrying the rock ring a bell? Oh…Wisconsin ran out of time, instead of Oregon winning. Is that what you are saying? Scoreboard baby, scoreboard.

● Guess beating USC twice consecutively in the LA Coliseum doesn’t count, 53-32 in 2010 and 62-51 in 2012. SC has never been considered to be a soft opponent and winning in LA is difficult. Ask Stanford. Ask Ohio State.

● Yes, Oregon lost the 2011 “Natty” on a last second field goal to Cam Newton’s Auburn, the 2010 Rose Bowl to Ohio State and the 2011 opener to LSU in the Cowboys Classic in Arlington, Texas. They easily could have scheduled Idaho on that date, but they didn’t. Wait…didn’t Florida State play Idaho this year…in Tallahassee? It was an 80-14 squeaker on November 23. I’m quivering just remembering where I was when I heard the score for the first time.

● For the quantitative types, Oregon is 56-9 in the last five years recording 10-wins or more in each of these seasons. This is the first year that a BCS Bowl game is not the reward for a great year. Not bad, not bad at all.

Even though ES(SEC)PN makes Game Day visits to Eugene (and I will give them credit for that), most of the Trilateral Commission for Global Domination by the Eastern Time Zone (TCGDETZ) can’t handle the team from Eugene, Oregon and they can barely tolerate the team from Waco, Texas (Baylor).

At least when the latter plays the folks in the midtown Manhattan bars don’t have to stay up so late.

http://www.buzzbissinger.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buzz_Bissinger

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friday_Night_Lights:_A_Town,_a_Team,_and_a_Dream

http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20755383,00.html

http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com/team/coaches/chip-kelly/1e82ad7a-dd3c-4f69-be3c-8e0ee114e7f3

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2013/10/22/or-ee-gone/

 

“Sometimes the most obvious question is the question. In Enron’s case: How do you make money?” — Fortune Magazine Reporter Bethany McLean.

bethany-mcleanx140

The simple answer was Enron wasn’t making money; the company was losing money hand-over-fist.

Enron was hiding these massive losses from regulators, investors, suppliers, partners and most of all, its own massively investing-in-Enron-stock employees.

Still investors poured billions into Enron simply because the stock was going up big time. The majority had no idea about how Enron made money in its energy, bandwidth and weather (go figure) trading schemes and didn’t seem to care because the stock was skyrocketing. As Martha would say: “It (was) a good thing.” Yep, a good thing until the house of cards came tumbling down in a 2001 bankruptcy filing, crashing and burning.

What was that about how does a company makes money?

As we head into the next round of hysteria as yet a third social media provider goes IPO (Initial Public Offering), this one, Twitter, under the ticker, TWTR, one needs to contemplate Bethany McLean’s most obvious of all questions.

twitterjackdorsey

How does Twitter make money?

How does LinkedIn make money?

How does Facebook make money?

How does J.C. Penne’ make money? Hint: It doesn’t.

This simple question needs to be posed to and answered by all publicly traded companies, whether they play in the new economy or the old economy.

The need to quickly, credibility and confidently answer this question, preferably in a brief elevator pitch, solidifies the need for well-trained and highly skilled corporate public relations, investor relations, crisis communications, brand and reputation management practitioners.

Teaching upper-division public relations courses, I would flash images of corporate logos up on the screen and ask students how Company A or Company B makes money.

In our quick media world — whether by conventional or digital means — the millennial digital native generation, more than any other that preceded it, has been bombarded incessantly on all sides by brands.

After initial hesitations, the students were quickly and enthusiastically recalling what the brand means in term of how a company makes money, and even “positioning” companies in their respective market spaces (e.g., BMW vs. VW: Nordstrom vs. Macy’s; Southwest vs. United). Starbucks and McDonald’s both sell upscale coffee. They now both offer drive-through windows. They are the same. Right? Wrong.

As mentioned before in Almost DailyBrett, LinkedIn and Facebook are both social media outlets. To Wall Street they couldn’t be more different.

LinkedIn debuted at $45 in 2011 and now trades at $245.13.linkedin_logo_11

Facebook went public at $38 in 2012 and now trades at $51.01.

zuckerberg

LinkedIn has been able to easily answer the how it makes money question (e.g., monetizes social media) by pointing to “connections,” premium services, advertising and the fact that LinkedIn is the choice for recruiters, job hunters, network builders and those seeking business leads.

Facebook is finally starting to gain traction in the market after its disastrous NASDAQ IPO. The company has been plagued by how do “friends” correlate with the legal tender?

Will 140-character per tweet Twitter be the next LinkedIn, the next Facebook or just maybe the first Twitter in the eyes of Wall Street investors?

A CNBC report this week pointed to Twitter’s relationship with the hard-to-get National Football League and CBS in which video supplied by both will be available for tweets. Wall Street may very well see a ka-ching correlation with this deal.

The deal and others, plus the recently announced Twitter S-1 (e.g., company prospectus) may have a direct bearing on what will be the pricing and Wall Street response to the much-anticipated IPO.

As more companies pursue the IPO route, minus the ones that opt to rebuild in privacy (e.g., Dell), that means even more opportunities for skilled-and-trained corporate public relations, investor relations, crisis communications, brand-and-management protection pros.

Conservatively, there are more than 5,100 publicly traded companies on the two major exchanges, the NYSE Euronext and NASDAQ. There are thousands more on overseas exchange, such as Japan’s Nikkei, Hong Kong’s Hang Sang, Britain’s “Footsie” or FTSE, France’s CAC-40 and Germany’s DAX.

Each of these companies, most definitely those in America, has reporting requirements on an annualized and quarterly basis. The Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) mandates 10-Q quarterly earnings reports; 10-K annual reports to shareholders; 8-K unscheduled “material” information disclosure announcements; S-4 additional share purchases, an annual meeting with shareholders, and of course, an S-1 filing of a privately held company prospectus prior to an IPO.

All of these filings require on-target prose, delivered conventionally and digitally, employing text, audio and video. Who are these message builders? Who will train them? And where can they be found?

As long as a publicly traded company is in business, it must report. It must communicate. It has absolutely no choice.

Quite clearly, the demand for these highly skilled corporate PR and investor relations practitioners outstrips the supply. Maybe that’s why they are compensated at a PR segment high average of $117,233 annually.

Sounds like an upwards-to-the-right market for qualitative-and-quantitative PR/IR types.

Full-Disclosure Note: The editor of Almost DailyBrett at various times owned shares of both LinkedIn and Facebook, only to subsequently sell the stocks. He fully anticipates as a mere retail investor being a late arrival to the upcoming Twitter IPO, if only to follow TWTR on a daily basis…Thank God he never bought into Enron.

http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20131003191330-270738-with-twitter-s-ipo-5-key-things-you-need-to-understand-about-the-social-ad-revolution

http://www.forbes.com/sites/tomiogeron/2013/10/03/twitter-reveals-long-awaited-ipo-plans-253m-revenue-in-first-half-of-2013/

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/10/03/twitter-discloses-its-i-p-o-plans/?_r=0

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