Tag Archive: unemployment rate


“It was pride that changed angels into devils; it is humility that makes men as angels.” – St. Augustine on one of “The Seven Deadly Sins”

How many hard-working women have become “mommies” without giving birth?

They have become mommies to way-too-many men, who have literally accomplished absolutely nothing since their high-school graduations.

No one will label these women as gold diggers because they are prospecting in the wrong mine.

Almost DailyBrett has repeatedly come into contact with these underachieving men who only overachieve when it comes to blowing away tens, hundreds, thousands with their virtual assault weapons.

Wonder how many they “killed” today during their latest binge video game session? How can society keep these poor souls away from snacks, smokes, booze, drugs and especially … real weapons?

Oops, too late.

Many of these men are narcissistic. Some are hypochondriacs. Even more are depressed.

They become “stressed” at the prospect of real work. They require their “me” time.

Most of all, they need a “mommy.”

And who are their mommies? The women, who support them.

The women, who pay for their “dates.” The women, who care for them. The women, who work their derrieres off to put food on their tables.

Whatever happened to the sinful “proud” man?

Instead of humble angels or proud devils, they are … biding time in their own personal purgatory.

If Universal Basic Income (UBI) ever became the law of the land, these “men” would briefly become energized, standing first in line for their eternal hand-outs and demanding even more.

‘When will my check be deposited into my account?’ Original content and video games are expensive.

These “men” sleep, breathe, eat and excrete. Therefore, they are entitled as a human right to the fruits of the labor of others, including their co-habitation, “mommies.”

Pathetic. Truly pathetic.

How Did We Get Here?

There are no jobs for these males. They are stuck in a 2008 economic recession time warp. There are “Help Wanted” signs everywhere, but alas all of these jobs are beneath these underachievers.

Ahhh … 2008 was 11 years ago.

Almost DailyBrett has commented before on the research by the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), concluding that one-third of all employment age males (20-54 years-young) are voluntarily not working. The record low 3.6 percent unemployment rate understates the nationwide labor shortage because these men are not counted in the workforce.

Their “mommies” are included since they are better equipped and suited for our digital service-oriented society. They have replaced parasitic men when it comes to bringing home the bacon.

Women have supplanted and surpassed men when it comes to university enrollments and participation in the labor force. There are still masculine enclaves (e.g., technology innovation and development), but ever more women are replacing men at once-before masculine workplaces (e.g., hardware stores).

Almost DailyBrett must ask, why do “mommies” put up with these loser men? More to the point, why don’t these men have more respect for themselves and yes … a little sinful pride?

Do we foresee a future in which the majority of men are not just overweight, but obese? Will we see them moving around in their motorized wheel chairs? Who is next at the kidney dialysis clinic? Will they be popping “just one more” happy pill (pain killer)?

The subject of “maternal instinct” is way above the pay grade of your author.

Is there such a thing as “mommy instinct” for men, who refuse to leave their high chairs?

http://www.deadlysins.com/pride

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2018/04/15/deadbeat-boyfriends/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2019/02/12/unwilling-to-work/

“We have a deep sense of responsibility to give back to our country and the people who help make our success possible.” – Tim Cook, Apple chief executive officer

The largest taxpayer in the world is paying more … $38 billion more … in one lump sum.

Apple is repatriating $200 billion in the world’s largest amount of overseas corporate assets, $252 billion.

The company also announced $350 billion in direct investments in the U.S. economy, not just share buy-backs. Apple will create 20,000 jobs right here in America.

Almost DailyBrett is proud to be an Apple shareholder, for more than the 83 percent in share appreciation since 2015.

Tim Cook and his lieutenants are proving to the world that a great company can be more than the innovator and producer of wonderful products (i.e. iPhone X, iPads, Mac). Apple is more than 123,000 jobs with full benefits and a terrific return for its shareholders

Apple is also redefining the relationship between fiduciary responsibility and corporate social responsibility (CSR).

To a few misguided, well-meaning souls, major corporations are somehow the enemy of the masses. And yet how does one who holds these views explain Apple’s good deeds?

The $38 billion is happening right now. These are additional revenues for the government that would have remained trapped overseas without a reduction in the world’s largest 35 percent corporate rate to 21 percent.

Think of $38 billion in terms of 38 x 1,000 x $1 million. That amount can start to make a quite a dent in fixing our highways, airports, bridges and other major infrastructure needs.

FILE PHOTO: The Apple Campus 2 is seen under construction in Cupertino, California in this aerial photo taken January 13, 2017. REUTERS/Noah Berger/File Photo

So much for those who say that tax reform is not a dynamic scoring stimulus.

These are the same folks who conveniently forgot the nation’s largest peacetime expansion occurred during the Reagan Presidency years in which 19 million jobs were created.

Yes, there will be a $1.75 billion-over-20 years impact to the federal treasury using static scoring.

But how much additional economic stimulus will come from putting more revenues back into the economy and lifting time-consuming, expensive regulations? This is the serendipity of dynamic scoring.

Now that Apple has announced the one-time payment of record taxes, a flood of domestic investment and five-figure increases in hiring, will Microsoft, Cisco, Google and Oracle do the same?

According to Standard & Poors, Microsoft has $132.1 billion in overseas holdings; Cisco, $69.1 billion, Google, $60.5 billion and Oracle, $58.5 billion.

Messrs Satya Nadella (MSFT), Chuck Robbins (CSCO), Larry Page (GOOG) and Mark Hurd (ORCL), it is time for each of your companies to follow Tim Cook’s lead and to give back to America.

Great Time To Be A College Graduate

As a tenure-track assistant professor of public relations, integrated marketing communications, corporate communications and investor relations, the author of Almost DailyBrett could not be more excited for my graduating students.

Please do not dismiss my excitement as Greenspanesque “Irrational Exuberance.” There is little doubt that our 26,000-point Dow is in need of a healthy correction, maybe 10 percent or more.

Nonetheless, when was the last time that our GDP (gross domestic product) was growing at a 3 percent annualized rate?

Our unemployment rate stands at 4.1 percent, very close to full employment.

Wages and salaries are rising, reflecting a labor shortage for skilled employees.

Our inflation rate (e.g., Consumer Price Index) was 2.1 percent in December.

The Federal Reserve’s Fed Funds rate is 1.25 percent.

Hmm … bull market, expanding global economy, low unemployment, labor shortage, low inflation, miniscule interest rates … sounds like a Goldilocks Economy. What’s not to like?

To top it off, we now have tax reform and regulatory relief.

Certainly, all of these factors will not last forever. They can’t and they won’t.

Having said all of the above, this is a great time to start or revive a career. Your author could not be more stoked for his students.

And he has more than once cautioned his students against taking the first offer. Don’t be arrogant. At the same time, don’t be afraid to be confident and maybe a tad bold.

Tim Cook and Apple have the wind in their sails. And to prove it, they are paying record taxes, investing in America and hiring Americans.

We have at least 200 billion repatriated reasons to rejoice.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/apple-to-pay-38-billion-in-repatriation-tax-plans-new-u-s-campus-1516215419

 

 

 

Or should we say the Pols are wrong?

The experts backed by polling originally told us: Britain will leave the European Union (EU).

Hold on. Wait … the polls and pols then said there would be no Brexit.

Global markets surged and the pound sterling gained strength against the greenback.

Ahh … the polls and pols were wrong once again. Can’t they get anything right?mobilelandline

Britain is indeed leaving the club. PM David Cameron resigned. The markets tanked along with the pound sterling and the Euro. It’s a mess.

What happened (again) to the “experts”?

Remember the elite pundits told us Donald Trump will flame out when the “Silly Season” turns to the “Serious Season.”

And then … The Donald will never win the Republican nomination. Certainly not.

Certainly, yes.

Why do we pay attention to the polls and listen to the pols?

“Two Nations Separated by Common Language” – Winston Churchill

Before we go much further, Almost DailyBrett will immediately acknowledge the political landscape of one nation does not necessarily equate to the state of affairs of another.

Some including the Daily 202 of the Washington Post are now hyperventilating that Brexit could very well mean that Donald Trump will be the 45th president of the United States.BREXIT ahead: UK leaves the EU

Let that thought permeate for a nanosecond or two.

Consider the contradictory news flashes from this morning:

Washington Post: New Post-ABC News poll finds support for Trump has plunged, giving Clinton a double-digit lead.

Wall Street Journal: Trump weathers stormy month on campaign trail, loses only two points versus Clinton — WSJ/NBC Poll.

What’s it going to be, political experts?

What may be certain in this most uncertain political environment is the electorates on both sides of the pond are anxious, full of angst and may be downright angry … and that makes them increasingly volatile and unpredictable.

The U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) of 2.5 percent for the past seven years, at least one full point under what it should be, is not and should not be accepted as the new normal.

Instead of celebrating globalization, free worldwide trade and technology breakthroughs (e.g., social, mobile and cloud) and having these all serve as symbols of progress, they are increasingly viewed as threats.

How long will it take for the machines to be cheaper than people (e.g., automated check-out, ATMs, robots, driverless cars …)? Each of these gadgets also has the added advantages of never whining, complaining, calling-in sick or demanding a pay raise.

The net effect: Far too many believe they are being left behind, and no one seems to care about them or that is their sense.

The U.S. unemployment rate is 4.7 percent according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And yet only 38,000 new jobs were created in May and labor participation stands at just 62 percent. And how many of these “employed” are underemployed, working less than 30 hours per week for zero benefits?

Something is amiss and it is not just in the new world, but obviously in the old world as well.

Land Line Surveys vs. Internet Polls

“Never in recorded history have so many been so misguided by so few.” – With apologies to the memory of Winston Churchill, if he was still around to sound out his opinion about pollsters and their surveys.berniemichigan

Hillary was supposed to blow out Bernie in the May 8 Michigan primary by 20 points; she lost by nearly two points.

The folks in the UK were increasingly expected to vote to stay in the European Union. Instead, they are leaving.

The polls are particularly wrong this year. What seems to be the problem?

Let’s face it, quantitative analysis has always suffered from the being a snap-shot-in-time syndrome. Polls are scientifically accurate with a 3.5 percent margin of error, 95 percent of the time provided the random sample is large enough … let’s say 1,000 respondents.

The increasingly difficult proposition lies with how one gathers a random scientifically valid critical mass of respondents to participate in a nationwide poll. The traditional way is for polling firms is to call registered voters on their land lines.

There were days when everyone had land lines. Those days have obviously passed, leaving the only folks with land lines to be older, less receptive to mobile technology, but at the same time they have a greater propensity to vote. Translated: These folks need to be surveyed, but they are not representative of a changing electorate.

The alternative is to call mobile numbers of the CPOs (cell-phone onlys) or a combo of mobile dialing and/or internet surveys. The advantage: This is clearly the wave of the future. The disadvantage: the mobile and PC crowd are younger and more educated, but with a lower propensity to vote.

The net effect of this discussion is a changing, volatile electorate that is increasingly difficult to measure with any sense of accuracy.

Can’t anyone get anything right?

Seems like a germane question at this point of time.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/paloma/daily-202/2016/06/24/daily-202-stop-underestimating-trump-brexit-vote-shows-why-he-can-win/576c89e9981b92a22d2dd3dc/?wpisrc=nl_daily202&wpmm=1

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2016/05/29/1978-all-over-again/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2016/01/27/why-do-we-listen-to-the-so-called-experts/

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/09/why-were-the-polls-in-michigan-so-far-off/

http://www.wsj.com/articles/donald-trump-weathers-stormy-month-loses-only-2-points-versus-hillary-clinton-1466946000

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/in-new-poll-support-for-trump-plunges-giving-clinton-a-double-digit-lead/2016/06/25/0565bef6-3a31-11e6-a254-2b336e293a3c_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-high_poll-0904am%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

 

 

It was one of the most sobering stories that I have read in many, many moons.

Alana Semuels in her LA Times piece, “America Out of Work” argues that near double-digit unemployment directly impacting 14.9 million could become a long-standing condition in America. http://articles.latimes.com/2010/sep/05/business/la-fi-america-unemployment-mainbar-20100905

“This is the new reality,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics. “In the past decade we’ve gone from the best labor market in our economic history to arguably one of the worst. It’s going to take years, if not decades, to completely recover from the fallout.”

The numbers are stark: To get the national unemployment rate back to 5%, where it was before the downturn, would require the economy to generate about 17 million jobs — or about 285,000 a month for five straight years — according to Heidi Shierholz, a labor economist at the Economic Policy Institute in Washington.

“To appreciate the enormity of that employment hole, consider that U.S. employers have shed 283,000 jobs since May,” Semuels wrote in early September.

Before we tie a boulder around our collective waists, clutching our precious Led Zeppelin catalog to our chests, and throwing ourselves off a bridge, keep in mind that it was exactly one decade ago that forecasters under the influence of the Internet bubble were virtually guaranteeing the Dow Jones would hit 27,000. This past Friday, the NYSE surged 197 points to 10,860. So much for 27,000 at least any time soon.

What intrigues this commentator as I begin today my pursuit of a master’s degree in “Communication and Society” at the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication is the pronounced difference in nomenclature between Eugene and the Silicon Valley.

Naturally I expected differences between the two cultures even though both are populated by very talented and highly educated people. In Eugene, I have heard in my short time substantial dialogue about “sustainability” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sustainability, “gender equality,” “public options,” “corporate social responsibility” and “marriage issues.” Nothing wrong with any of that.

During my 15 years in Silicon Valley particularly following the dot.com bust and right up to the present deep recession, the discussion focused on “fiduciary responsibility,” “expense controls,” “promoting profitability,” “driving revenues,” “expanding gross margin,” “ROI (Return on Investment)” and simply “survival.”

A question that I am going to personally explore in depth during the course of the next two years is whether our universities are preparing students to successfully transition from the priorities of the university campus to the mandates of the corporate world.

Semuels writes about the tremendous challenge that grads face, particularly in today’s economy: “But young workers are suffering too. In August, the unemployment rate for workers 16 to 24 was 18.1%.

“Research has shown that economic downturns can stunt the prospects of these new entrants to the job market for a decade or longer. Some college graduates unable to find jobs in their chosen fields are forced to trade down to lower-skilled, often temporary work. That translates into puny wages, missed opportunities and a slower climb up the career ladder.”

This is not a great time to be an out-of-work adult over the half-century mark, but it is also an incredibly challenging time for the graduating classes of the next few years. What the second group has as an advantage over the first is simply time and life expectancy. The real question is whether they are being properly prepared for the challenges of a rough economy, one that appears to be with us for years, if not (gasp) decades, to come.

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