Tag Archive: University of Southern California


“It (Trump acquittal celebration) was dark because he’s made clear that his mind is dark. This is somebody in deep psychological distress right now. Self-pitying, insecure, angry. He doesn’t accept abstract concepts like right or wrong, like morality or immorality, like true or false. He recognizes what is good for him in the moment.” — New CNN White House correspondent John Harwood

Right or wrong? Morality or immorality? True or false? Does this dispassionate interpretation say more about Donald Trump or John Harwood?

To his credit, Harwood earned his bachelor’s degree in history and economics from a good school, Duke University. Alas, he did not earn a bachelor’s or better yet … an advanced degree in psychology (e.g., study of mind and behavior) or psychiatry (e.g., study of the treatment of mental illness).

With that undeniable information in mind, Almost DailyBrett must ask: On what basis is Harwood able to appear on elite national television and “diagnose” the president as being “in deep psychological distress?”

The day after President Trump’s oh-so-predictable-for-months easy acquittal by the U.S. Senate, POTUS #45 was last seen happily displaying the front page of the Washington Post, conjuring images of Harry Truman holding up the 1948 Chicago Tribune headline: “Dewey Defeats Truman.”

No reporter, editor, anchor, correspondent ever questioned Truman’s psychological fitness, so why is it open season on the present incumbent?

“I have asked this question a number of times in (the media) describing the president’s state of mind, he’s angry, he’s unhinged and all of these negative attributes, prescribed by the arm-chair psychologists in the media.” — Long-time media analyst for the Washington Post, CNN and Fox News Howard Kurtz

As far as Almost DailyBrett knows, the only elite media commentator with any academic credentials to credibly analyze a public figure’s state of mind is the late Washington Post columnist, Charles Krauthammer. He earned his M.D. in Psychiatry from Harvard University in 1975.

“Trump is right. It (elite liberal media) is the opposition party. Indeed, furiously so, often indulging in appalling overkill. It’s sometimes embarrassing to read the front pages of major newspapers, festooned as they are with anti-Trump editorializing, masquerading as news.” — Washington Post columnist Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018)

And they are self-anointed psychological and psychiatric analysts as well.

Never Took A Psychology Class In College

Almost DailyBrett holds two academic degrees, a bachelor’s degree in broadcasting journalism from the University of Southern California in 1978, and a master’s degree in communication and society from the University of Oregon in 2012.

Your author went on to become a political reporter, a gubernatorial press secretary, a semiconductor industry communicator and a university professor in public relations, corporate communications and investor relations. Having said all of that, there was never even one class in psychology or psychiatry, much less a degree in either subject.

Unlike Charles Krauthammer, we know Harwood does not have a degree in either of these subjects along with certainly dozens and dozens of elite media practitioners.

If that is indeed the case, why do they believe they are qualified to publicly diagnose — without violating the medical privacy HIPAA — psychological impairment of a certain offending politician?

And with this precedent established will they (reporters, correspondents) make similar mental fitness conclusions for others in the future, who are not part of the their political party?

Could this practice be based upon simple unbridled arrogance as well?

Almost DailyBrett has repeatedly analyzed the empirically demonstrated loss of public esteem for the elite media during the course of the last four decades-plus as demonstrated by the Gallup Organization.

Are elite media adding to the political division in our country?

With only 41 percent nationally approving of their performance (less than Trump’s approval rating), including only 36 percent of independents and 15 percent of Republicans, the answer is obvious.

And when a White House “correspondent” and other elites goes way beyond their pay grades and training to question the sanity of a “vulgar” and “vindictive” president, is there any wonder why the esteem of the media has taken such a nose dive in our center right country (e.g., median voter)?

You don’t need an advanced degree in psychology or psychiatry to understand why.

 

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2020/01/12/has-all-media-become-partisan-media/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2019/12/19/not-pretending-to-be-fair-anymore/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2020/01/12/has-all-media-become-partisan-media/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2018/02/15/oppositional-journalism/

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2020/01/21/is-msnbc-less-fair-than-cnn/

Is the Pope, Jesuit?

Do bears fertilize Yellowstone?

“Most of the literature supports that argument, which is incredibly destructive because professors are dumbing down their classes for better evaluations.” -University of Oregon Professor Bill Harbaugh

“Professors to some extent can ‘buy’ good evaluations by giving high grades, so the evaluation process is probably a major factor in grade inflation.” – Richard Vedder, The Chronicle of Higher Education

Dumbing down classes?

Buying good evaluations?

Why do SEOI (Student Evaluation of Instruction) results hold a disproportionate impact on whether an assistant professor achieves tenure at major universities or small colleges?

Sure there are other contributors particularly august empirical research, but student evaluations are given so much weight that some professors may be prompted to go easy on their students.

Are these students ready for the reality of a boss? Have they become, the boss?

If tenure is the Holy Grail for academics, do college professors literally sell their collective souls to drink from the golden chalice?

Will professors avoid teaching difficult classes at unpopular times (e.g., communications research at 8 am) to protect tenure?

If they knew they had to bite into the forbidden apple by sweetening an undergraduate’s grade would they do so in order to earn tenure, making it nearly impossible to be terminated?

As the author of Almost DailyBrett prepares to exit the academic world stage right in two months and one day (who is counting?), there are thoughts that keep coming back about how to improve higher education … if that is still possible.

My sentiments are not based upon cynicism, but a realistic acknowledgement about how difficult it is too meaningfully change the culture on our campuses, particularly when the adversaries are powerful professor unions and their CBAs (collective bargaining agreements).

What Is The Purpose of College, Anyway?

“Student evaluations can be useful when they are divorced from tenure, retention and promotion evaluations.” – Former Duke University Professor Stuart Rojstaczar

Walking along faculty office hallways, your author has been repeatedly stunned by assertions that the purpose of a university is to ensure that a student succeeds in her or his chosen … major.

Is the major an end in itself? Finis? Endo Musico?

If that is true the onus is not on whether a student is preparing for a career, but how a professor teaches courses and advises these fledglings in order to simply graduate.

Faculty über alles?

Almost DailyBrett has a differing view:

The mission of a college or university should be to prepare students to land positions with full benefits – not just jobs – in their respective fields of study. The results should be a happy and lucrative professional careers.

The curricula for a Department of Communication or a School of Journalism and Mass Communication should emphasize real-world courses, which lead to a recognized profession including: Digital Journalism, Film and Public Relations.

Are parents envisioning their child prodigy with tons of theory stuck in between the ears moving back home at 22-years-young?

How about reducing the tenure impact of the Student Evaluations of Instruction (SEOIs), and instead introducing a measurement that weighs how many of a professor’s students actually land positions in their respective fields of study and build meaningful careers?

Some are entitled to dismiss the musings of Almost DailyBrett, considering that your author is retiring after four years as a tenure-track assistant professor. This writer will NOT achieve tenure. Believe it or not, there are more ways than tenure to measure a meaningful career and life.

What is more exciting is how many of my students have moved onto the professional ranks and are thriving. As the airlines instruct us: “Put on your own mask before assisting others.” These newly minted professionals can buy low and sell high with their discretionary income because they have been prepared by professional schools.

Let’s see how they are doing in their fields? How can a university measure career accomplishment?

Every university has a “development” arm in the form of alumni associations. Similar to the IRS, alumni associations without fail will always find you.

You can run, but you can’t hide from … alumni associations. Rarely does a day go by without your author receiving a communication from his two alma maters: the University of Southern California and the University of Oregon.

Practicing evolution and not revolution, let’s retain … but lower the impact of student evaluations and academic research. Let’s add into the mix how well our students are doing in landing real positions and building happy careers.

As Sheryl Crow sings, “If it makes you happy, it can’t be that bad.”

https://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/09/17/professors-and-the-students-who-grade-them/student-evaluations-offer-bad-data-that-leads-to-the-wrong-answer

https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/innovations/student-evaluations-grade-inflationdeclining-student-effort/24926

https://www.dailyemerald.com/2017/07/18/uo-study-finds-correlation-grade-inflation-student-course-evaluations/

 

“I’m sorry if my message got misconstrued, but it really was in the best interest of the young men. Hindsight’s 20-20. I probably should have said it was an interview. Semantics are semantics.” – New USC Football Coach Steve Sarkisian

“Misconstrued”?

“Semantics are Semantics”?

How about, to be charitable, telling a big fib?

Sorry Sark, you will never totally restore your reputation for integrity.

sarkuw

Media types and the general public will always have an extra degree of skepticism whenever they interact with you. There is no way to change this inescapable conclusion.

Almost DailyBrett has commented before about Jody Powell’s self-proclaimed, “Right to Lie.”

Powell, former press secretary to President Jimmy Carter, was placed into a lie-or-jeopardize American lives dilemma, when he was asked point-blank in 1980 about possible rescue mission for 52 American diplomats trapped in Iran.

He knew the score. He protected the (ultimately failed) mission. He lied and deceived. He really had no choice.

Larry Speakes, former press secretary to President Ronald Reagan, was told to “knock down” rumors about a 1983 American invasion of Grenada. He did. The GI’s landed the following morning. An internally misled and peeved Speakes was charged with lying.

In both cases, the press secretary must interact with the White House Press Corps on a daily basis. A “no comment” response would be interpreted as tantamount to confirmation. The press secretary does not have the authority, regardless of her or his conscience and upbringing, to jeopardize American lives.

jodypowellwhitehouse

Power lied. Speakes lied without knowing it, and was charged with…lying.

Looking back to this previous weekend, former Washington, now USC Coach Sarkisian could have easily avoided being put into a situation in which he had to tell a big white lie.

Until this past Monday, Sarkisian was the head football coach for the University of Washington. Prior to his arrival in Seattle, he was a high-profile assistant coach for Pete Carroll’s USC Trojans.

And naturally because of his relative success (e.g., never beat Oregon) during his five years with Udub and his USC pedigree, he was a natural for the short list of potential new coaches at Troy.

USC Athletic Director Pat Haden flew this past Sunday to Seattle to interview Sarkisian. Trust me; he was not heading to the Northwest to bask in the freezing weather. Ultimately, the interview went well. There were still “I’s” to dot and “T’s” to cross as Haden returned to SoCal.

Sarkisian still in his Udub head coach capacity had a scheduled Monday morning interview with Seattle KJR (AM-590), the flagship station for Husky football. He knew that he was going to be asked about the swirling rumors that he had been interviewed by Haden for the SC job.

What were his personal public relations and reputation management options (Keep in mind, none of them were perfect)?

Sark’s options were to go ahead with the previously scheduled radio talk and mischaracterize his meeting with Haden as a nice chat, and not an interview. Keep in mind, the majority of the UW Athletic Department administrators and his team was presumably listening to the interview.

The other option was to postpone the interview, thus maintaining his credibility. This option requires POing the media, particularly the chaps at KJR Sports Radio, and starting rumors as to why he was not available.

As we all know now, Sark went forward with the Monday morning interview and his credibility took a huge hit just hours later when USC announced he was Troy’s new head coach.

sarkusc

“I just felt like at the time, nowhere near finalizing the deal, that it wasn’t the right thing to say,” Sarkisian said. “I didn’t either want to put (USC or UW players) in a situation of uncertainty.”

“Nowhere near finalizing the deal?”

Sark, you met with Pat Haden on Sunday, and USC announced your hiring on Monday afternoon. When you are in a hole, stop digging.

In football, there are times when it is best to punt than being stopped short of the first-down markers.

This was a time when Sark personally should have punted. Postpone the interview. Let the rumors fly. Keep your reputation intact. And later, offer an exclusive post-USC hiring interview exclusive for KJR. Do you really think the torqued-off station would decline that opportunity?

They would have jumped at it.

Presidential press secretaries have the right to lie (and this is debatable) to protect American lives. The same latitude does not apply to Semantics-are-Semantics football coaches.

http://seattletimes.com/html/huskyfootball/2022386995_sarkisian04xml.html

http://sportspressnw.com/2171412/2013/sark-the-liar-my-message-got-misconstrued

http://www.sportsradiokjr.com/main.html

http://www.latimes.com/sports/college/usc/la-sp-1203-usc-sarkisian-20131203,0,7317089,full.story#axzz2mdDVswIi

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/college-football/news/20131202/steve-sarkisian-usc-head-coach-washington/?xid=ob_sisports

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2010/11/03/the-right-to-lie/

We tend to gravitate towards the campuses with party reputations.” – Nicole Henderson of adult film maker Shane’s World of Van Nuys.

Guess that would include Chico State…

There is the classic college-age problem associated with wrecking the family car.

And then there is the delicate issue with going a tad too far with one’s girlfriend.

And then there is calling mom and dad and reporting that you have been suspended…ah…for being in a porn flick with your fraternity bros.

What?

It seemed like a good idea at the time for the brothers of the Phi Kappa Tau house of Chico State.

phitau

Since graduating with my undergraduate degree from the University of Southern California in 1978, I have always been proud of my affiliation with the Phi Kappa Tau national fraternity.

Yes, yes, the USC (Pi) chapter of Phi Kappa Tau closed in 1988 for hazing, but I was there many, many moons before that. The worst I can remember is holding a lit match upside down and speed-reciting the Greek alphabet before my hand was singed. Hopefully, the house can be recolonized at some point.

Since that time, I have uttered a sigh of relief more than once that I am not associated with the Phi Taus from Chico State (Beta Omega).

Last year, the Chico State chapter was suspended for breaking the underage drinking ban on campus. Considering that Chico State and its 37 frats and sororities have endured undergrad deaths associated with alcohol and water intoxication (hazing incident), the drinking ban seems more than appropriate.

Looking back to 2005, one must ask what were the Chico Phi Taus thinking when they decided to mix hormonal college guys with porn actresses and alcohol. Did they ever consider the consequences of what would happen when Shane’s World actually produced and distributed, “College Invasion 6”?

Did these Chico State rocket scientists ever weigh the impact of the Internet when it comes to their “acting” debuts?

In reviewing the “literature” about the Chico State Phi Tau porn movie incident, there appears to be several instances when sanity could/should have prevailed, prompting at least one brother to ask the obvious question: Why are we doing this?

Even though the answer is not crystal clear, there is strong evidence to suggest that the Chico State Phi Taus contacted Shane’s World. Considering that these studs starred in College Invasion 6, it stands to reason that there were five earlier versions of these movies. Arizona State and Indiana were reportedly two earlier venues. Did the Phi Taus watch one of these earlier versions during a stag night, and a bad idea was born?

Okay, the Chico State Phi Taus eventually convinced Shane’s World to send up a film crew, four actresses and two actors for a simulated Animal House-style toga party…but first came the testing for HIV and STDs about three weeks before. Did anyone stop and think: Why are we getting tested? Are there any potential health hazards to avoid?

When the big day arrived in the fall of 2004, the Chico State Phi Taus were required to produce identification to ensure that no minors were participating and to sign release forms. Again, did anyone question: What are we doing?

And just before as a warm up, there was “naked hula hoop” and the time-tested “p…y ring toss.” At this point, you have to know that zero fraternity guys are asking any questions. It’s Zero Dark Thirty…let’s go guys.

And then, it was cameras, lights and hormonal frat guy/porn babe action time. Sounded like a good idea at the time.

phitauchico

At long last, it was then time to pack up the equipment, a last round of hugs, and then to the editing room. The Chico State Phi Taus were ready to become porn stars…or studs. It was all good…until they were suspended.

Since 2005, the pace of digital technology and related social media has accelerated. Think of social media this way: It’s radioactive. Similar to nuclear power, it can illuminate a city or it can turn it to ashes.

For the Chico State Phi Taus, particularly those who participated in the porno, let’s hope their careers were not irreparably harmed. Let’s hope they learned an important lesson about making good decisions. Let’s hope they defer to the brain in-between their ears as opposed to the other brain.

Animal House (shot at the University of Oregon) is a fun movie. Not so sure that I would hire any of the bros of “Delta House” for a sensitive job. The same applies to the “film” stars of the Chico State Phi Tau house.

http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=64711

http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/California_State_University,_Chico_fraternity_suspended_for_making_frat_house_porno_flick

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,151910,00.html

http://www.newsreview.com/chico/fraternity-caught-with-pants-down/content?oid=34413

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1499287/students-suspended-over-frat-house-porn-film.jhtml

http://articles.latimes.com/2005/apr/15/local/me-chico15

http://dir.groups.yahoo.com/group/fraternalnews/message/1939?var=1

http://www.hearstfdn.org/hearst_journalism/competitions.php?type=Writing&year=2006&id=17

http://www.krcrtv.com/news/Chico-State-Fraternity-Suspended-for-Alcohol-Violation/-/14286064/14167016/-/p5xfd3z/-/index.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Lampoon%27s_Animal_House

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1499287/students-suspended-over-frat-house-porn-film.jhtml

http://csuchico.phikappatau.org/

“…If you worked hard, you could do well enough to raise a family, own a home, send your kids to college, and put a little away for retirement.” – President Barack Obama’s 2012 State of the Union Address

“Millions of young Americans have graduated from college during the Obama presidency, ready to use their gifts and get moving in life. Half of them can’t find the work they studied for, or any work at all.” – Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisconsin

Bok

“If you think education is expensive; try the cost of ignorance.” – Former Harvard President Derek Bok

It all seemed so easy.

Go to college. Get your degree. Land that first job. Build a career. Retire happy.

Or at least that was the plan.

It used to be that a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree from a reputable university or college was the ticket to at least a middle-class lifestyle. A graduate degree did not lead to an “overqualified” descriptor, but even better employment prospects.

Guess we have to say that the best laid plans of mice and college grads often go astray.

It’s not that Derek Bok is wrong. There is a wide gulf between those with college degrees and those who only graduated from high school, or worse, dropped out of high school.  That divide still exists, but only if you can find a job.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported for first time that there are more unemployed Americans who attended at least one year of college (4.7 million) than unemployed Americans who graduated or dropped out of high school (4.3 million). And these figures do not include the 14 million Americans who are underemployed or simply gave up the hunt for a job. Are there more underemployed college attendees than those who graduated or dropped out of high school? I wouldn’t bet against it.

gradsandduck

As a university instructor in public relations, I am deeply troubled that one-half of college graduates are not finding a job, any job. Mom and dad are shelling out tens of thousands of dollars and/or students are going deeply into debt only to face what could be a grim future, saddled with a ton of red ink.

The cumulative numbers are unprecedented and staggering: $16 trillion in national debt; 23 million unemployed or underemployed; a record 46.7 million on food stamps; 14 million underwater on mortgages; 13 million vacant properties; 50 percent of new college graduates can’t find a job.

Does this mean as one of my USC fraternity brothers wrote this morning that a college degree has become the equivalent of a high-school diploma?

Personally, I am optimistic but also realistic. Nearly two-thirds of students are heading off to the promise of post-secondary school. At the same time, the economic funk that has besieged the nation and most of the developed world will not end anytime soon. What should we as educators do to help prepare our students to effectively compete in order to be among the 50 percent that are finding jobs as opposed to the other half that are despondent and frustrated?

● Students will be hired that successfully address the Return on Investment (ROI) question. What’s in it for an employer to hire Student A over Student B? What differentiates Student A from Student B? In a 50 percent world (at least for the time being) the answer does not lie with, “I really work well with people.” Sorry that is a distinction without any difference. The real difference lies not with the degree, but a degree with meaningful experience (e.g., internship).

● We need to think of colleges and universities as professional schools. We should be preparing next generation professionals, not future conservative or liberal activists. Professionals will be hired. Activists will be in the streets, in tents or back at home.

● We need to equip students with the skills of a digital world: computation, science, verbal and written expression in the languages of the 21st Century and the ability to tell the story, and tell it well. Effective persuasion in the Lingua Franca cannot be effectively outsourced. The SEC will not look kindly upon quarterly earnings reports and CEO letters written in the third world.

● We must teach students that competition is permanent. We should also help them to understand that digital is eternal. That embarrassing under-the-influence photo, unrestrained offensive rant or display of inked and/or pierced private body parts via social media may be all the difference between Student A being hired or not being hired. Student B will not shed a tear for the what-were-you-thinking competition.

florida

 

● American Students also need to understand that a degree from a U.S. university or college is not a panacea. Students from all over the globe are rightfully yearning for their piece of the pie. They are competing, sometimes fiercely, and why shouldn’t they?

If a student chooses to pursue a college degree and move on beyond a high school diploma, it should mean something special. This may be controversial, but personally I do not see a college education as a preordained civil right or an entitlement. It must be earned. The same is true for beating the competition, engaging in lifelong learning and ultimately winning in the digital workplace of today and tomorrow.

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/most-unemployed-americans-attended-least-college-first-time-152523538.html

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/01/24/remarks-president-state-union-address

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0812/80423.html

http://chronicle.com/blogs/innovations/college-for-all-obamas-higher-education-agenda-part-3-of-8/31832

http://thinkexist.com/quotation/if_you_think_education_is_expensive-try/188916.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derek_Bok

I didn’t give a particle about Hopalong Cassidy in 1976…

…and I really don’t care much about the fictional Old West shoot-em-up character now.

hopalong

My Journalism 101 assignment was laid out in a poorly mimeographed piece of parchment paper: Write a dreaded obit about the late-William Lawrence Boyd (1895-1972) and entice people to care about the star of more than 60 “Hoppy” films, who died with his boots on.

There was no passion, no emotion, just a piece of paper about someone who did not touch my life, and never would. I was also a college sophomore at the University of Southern California. The results of my “effort” were predictable as in predictably lousy.

As a result of this assignment and others, I earned a big fat and well-deserved “C” in the class. What was worse was the professor (who will go nameless to protect the guilty) pulled me aside and strongly suggested that I consider another career.

That was 35 years ago.

Fortunately, the next semester saved my major in Broadcasting Journalism and launched my career. I enrolled in Reporting Public Affairs with Joel Kotkin, who at the time had put his degree at UC Berkeley five years into his rear-view mirror and was the West Coast correspondent for the Washington Post.

kotkin

The year was now 1977, and there was a mayoral election in Los Angeles. Each student was assigned a candidate and a campaign. The candidates were the incumbent Tom Bradley, former California State Senator Alan Robbins and Howard Jarvis, who authored the landmark property tax-reduction initiative, Proposition 13, the following year. My assignment was to follow Robbins, who eventually lost the election and later spent a long time in a very bad place.

Robbins campaigned heavily on the Jewish West Side of Los Angeles and a young college kid followed him, and learned everything he could about his campaign. This particular USC student was a political animal and loved writing and reporting. Some were questioning Robbins’ Jewishness, prompting a heckler to yell out in a temple that “Alan Robbins is a goy.” Robbins snapped back, “Alan Robbins is not a goy.” This was full-contact politics on vivid display and I eagerly engulfed myself in this story.

I received an “A” in “Reporting Public Affairs” and my career was upwards to the right. There will always be a soft spot in my heart for Professor Kotkin, who is now a fellow at Chapman College, a columnist for the Wall Street Journal and others, and the author of “The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050.”

The reason why I am tapping back into history now is that I have taken up the Kotkin role, not his encyclopedic command of American political, geographical and demographic trends (I am not worthy), but his dedication to teaching students…and in at least one particular case giving a student a much-needed second chance.

Today I am a graduate teaching fellow at the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication. Hopefully in a year, I will be teaching strategic communications, social media, financial communications and media/analyst/employee relations to upper division students.

I need to keep in mind that a professor can cripple through her or his words the dreams of students. Suggesting out loud to someone who has the talent and skill sets to succeed in a given profession that they should look elsewhere is not helpful and may be even unethical. That’s exactly what happened to me.

Please don’t get me wrong. Tenured professors, associate professors, assistant professors, adjunct instructors and even lowly graduate teaching fellows are not there to be a buddy or a pal to college students. We are not there to be the university version of dandelion dads and marshmallow moms. The work world is hopefully over the horizon for these students and a boss or heaven forbid, a bosshole, can be worse, much worse than any professor.

Colleges and universities are the ultimate start-up. Students have dreams and aspirations. Not all classes are a perfect fit…certainly Journalism 101 with its lame Hopalong Cassidy obit exercise was not a good fit for me. Having said that, my lack of performance in that particular introductory class did not justify being told to choose another profession, such as selling insurance.

Words can be like daggers, particularly coming from a professor with an advanced degree or more. Sticks and stones may break my bones and words will never hurt me, which is true in most cases. At the same time, these ultra-critical words have major impact on impressionable young students trying to embark on a career path. Let’s offer constructive criticism where it is warranted, but more importantly let’s propel these students into the stratosphere so they can pursue their dreams and be everything they want to be.

http://www.hopalong.com/home.asp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Boyd_(actor)

http://www.joelkotkin.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joel_Kotkin

http://www.joelkotkin.com/content/004-biography

http://www.joincalifornia.com/candidate/5796

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