Tag Archive: Willie Sutton


Why can’t we just get along?” – Rodney King

Is it heresy to actually celebrate teaching on today’s college campuses?larrycrowne

Seems like a silly question on the surface, but on closer inspection there is absolutely no doubt that research is held in higher esteem than teaching among faculty-and-university-administrator thought leaders on today’s American college campuses.

Guess that means that “Research 1” is more than just a Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education designation; it is a dominant mindset.

Keep in mind: basic, applied and predictive research are critical ingredients for discoveries to conquer horrific diseases, to devise better ways to manage our planet, and to produce new-and-always-improved bits, bytes, bells and whistles. All of these Carnegie Research 1 universities afford higher priorities to research, graduate 50 or more Ph.Ds, and secure $40 million or more (usually much more) of federal research funding every year.

And certainly, private industry and governmental agencies (e.g., National Science Foundation or NSF) pour millions into universities for research. In turn, universities form “advancement” departments to entice these research grants as well as alumni and friend donations. Yes, there is a huge link between university research and the legal tender, which in turn leads to the prevailing research über alles mindset.

It was notorious robber Willie Sutton, who once said about banks: That’s where the money is.”

Does research reign supreme? Does that mean that good old-fashioned teaching and student mentoring are relegated to second-class status? Both answers trend toward the affirmative … but should they?

Winners and Non-Winners

“University politics are vicious precisely because the stakes are so small.” – Dr. Henry A. Kissinger, former U.S. Secretary of State, National Security Advisor, and 15-year Harvard University Professor

This is not the first time that Almost DailyBrett has cited this particular Kissingeresque quote. There are certain sayings that just keep-on giving.

There are some poor souls, who sincerely do not believe there are warring camps on college campuses between those who generally align with research and academics and those who favor teaching and professional experience. For most, the two are generally regarded to be mutually exclusive with one clearly dominant and the other sadly, subordinate.algorithms

If you believe that the research/academic crowd holds sway on the vast majority of campuses, particularly Research 1 facilities, you would be correct. Let’s ask here and now: Is that the way it should be?

What Do Parents and Students Really Care About?

Has anybody thought about the opinions of the parents, who pay the tuition, or the students, who are mortgaging their future to years of staggering debt? Are these our customers? And the customer is always right. Right? Or wrong?

Students may actually appreciate learning something they can use in their coming careers and throughout their respective lives. But do the  majority of academics really give a rodent’s hindquarters about teaching and mentoring?

Isn’t that why the university evolutionary process relegates low-paid and underappreciated adjunct instructors to perform the rudimentary and mundane task of teaching undergraduates?

Before you ask, Central Washington University is NOT a Research 1 university. Way back in 1891, the university began as the Washington State Normal School with a dedication to teaching the instructors of tomorrow.cwuwildcast

In the spirit of radical transparency let me proclaim the author of Almost DailyBrett served as an adjunct instructor at the University of Oregon (a Research 1), published ghost blogging research in PRSA’s Public Relations Journal, and now researches and teaches/mentors public relations and advertising students at Central Washington University.

Now that the consumer warning has been issued, let’s ask a pivotal question: Can there be a balance on university campuses when it comes to research and teaching/mentoring?

Sure it makes sense for adjuncts rather than full professors to teach English 101, but if parents and students are paying top dollar to attend university shouldn’t the majority of the classes be taught by assistant, associate and full professors?

If not, are universities dropping the ball in teaching and mentoring students in their preparation for the life-long learning jobs of tomorrow?

http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/professors-guide/2010/04/28/10-reasons-to-go-to-a-research-university

http://carnegieclassifications.iu.edu/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_research_universities_in_the_United_States

http://www.biography.com/people/rodney-king-9542141

http://quoteinvestigator.com/2013/08/18/acad-politics/

http://www.henryakissinger.com/biography.html http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/h/henry_a_kissinger_2.html

http://www.snopes.com/quotes/sutton.asp

 

It’s not really about asking for the raise but knowing and having faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along. And that I think might be one of the additional superpowers that quite frankly women who don’t ask for raises have. Because that’s good karma, that’ll come back.” – Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

Was inarticulate re how women should ask for raise. Our industry must close gender pay gap so a raise is not needed because of a bias.” – Nadella follow-up tweet

satya

The new Microsoft chief hit the wrong button on his PowerPoint clicker …

Or will his dentist find foot prints in his mouth?

Women should not ask for pay raises and just rely on “Karma.”

There is no Namaste at Microsoft today.

Sexism is Alive and Well

As Almost DailyBrett has previously commented sexism still lurks, even in women-dominated professions, including public relations.

Working at Edelman Public Relations five years ago, our Silicon Valley office was 134 kind souls, 110 with XX chromosomes. There was no line at the men’s room, simply because representatives of the knuckle-dragging gender were in short supply. Nonetheless, we male folk were well compensated.

Looking around my public relations and integrated marketing communication classrooms at Central Washington University, approximately three-out-of-every-four students is female. A comparable trend exists at the University of Oregon and conceivably other universities teaching public relations and communications around the nation.

And despite the undeniable numerical superiority for women practitioners, there is a pervasive, stubborn and resolute pay gap between men and women in public relations. According to a San Diego State School of Journalism & Media Studies quantitative study of Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) members, published in Public Relations Journal, male public relations practitioners earn on the average $84,368, compared to women at $76,063. That amounts to an $8,305 difference in annual salary between the two genders. At first glance, that figure sounds relatively close.

However, the magnitude of the different pay for equal work comes into play when you multiply the $8,305 delta over the course of a 40-year career, bringing the total to a staggering $332,200 loss of earning power for women practitioners, their children and their families.

Microsoft’s Nadella is undoubtedly one bright dude, but he made comments Thursday that are not smart. Weren’t blacks told to chill out, have faith and wait out inequality? That seems to be the message that Nadella extolled about pay inequity in the workplace. Nadella upon reflection (and probably a kick in his nether region by Microsoft’s PR department) fired off the obligatory apology tweet … but the damage was done.

karma

“Rounding Error”

One of my former students was being offered an entry-level job by a West Coast public relations agency. She was thrilled by the prospect of a $33,000 annual salary and believe it or not: Three weeks of annual vacation (try taking off 15 working days at any major agency).

When it was suggested that she not take the first offer, and to ask for $2,000 more per year (essentially a rounding error for the finance department of a multi-million-dollar agency), she initially balked. Eventually she diplomatically said she needed a $35,000 salary, and the hiring manager didn’t even blink.

Upon reflection, she said (her words, not mine) that women are not good in negotiations and asking for what they want. Almost DailyBrett has no empirical data to confirm or deny that assertion, but she was convinced it was true.

What Must Be Done

Do public relations, marketing, social media and investor relations professors and instructors have a role to play in closing the communications salary pay gap between men and women? The answer is affirmative particularly when it comes to mentoring.

What jobs pay more? Technicians or managers? Let’s face it, technicians will always be paid in the five-figure range, the only variable is what is the first number. Some women may prefer working behind the scenes and being an integral part of a team. That’s fine, but these jobs most likely will never lead to six-figures.

Why not encourage more women students to be leaders of teams and to train for management in public relations, marcom, investor relations or social media? When asked why he robbed banks, Willie Sutton said “that’s where the money is.”

There is also a major difference in pay rates within communications segments: Investor relations, financial communications and corporate public relations pay very well, non-profit and community relations not so much.

The average pay for practitioners in investor relations/financial communications is $117,233 … ka-ching. For corporate public relations, professionals are earning on an average, $88,827 … conceivably with managers, directors and vice presidents making above the median.

Conversely, community relations jobs pay $63,437 and non-profit positions, $62,275. Think of it this way, it is a big leap from the median to the six-figure mark for those working in community relations and/or non-profit.

Should women students be encouraged to seriously consider managerial positions, particularly those in high-paying investor relations, financial communications and corporate public relations disciplines? The answer seems obvious.

Ultimately, the choice will be made by the graduating student as she embarks into the wide-ranging field of public relations, marcom, investor relations and social media. Her decision and those made by literally thousands of her colleagues may play a pivotal role in closing the public relations gender pay gap once and for all.

http://mashable.com/2014/10/09/microsoft-ceo-women-karma-raises/?utm_cid=mash-com-fb-main-link

http://techcrunch.com/2014/10/09/microsoft-ceo-opens-mouth-inserts-foot-on-gender-pay-gap/?ncid=rss

https://almostdailybrett.wordpress.com/2013/10/01/addressing-the-gender-pay-gap-in-public-relations/

 

 

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